#1
I'm so new to this, that I jut have to jump in with this question.

On several sites, I see explanations of how to create a chord - to me, that means a sound with one strum of the fingers or whatever. So, 'C' is created by putting your fingers and points x y x, etc.

So why is it with classical players that they don't 'strum', or at least to me don't appear to strum, but rather they pick out the string they want to produce a sound? Do classical players ever play chords, as such?

Sorry for such a dumb question, if that's what it is.
#2
Dude? who told you that?... not true!

Strumming is just another technique of playing guitar,
and ya can't get any more "classical" than the master himself.

Go to y-o-u-t-u-b-e, and simply type this into the search box:
Leyenda by Albeniz in HD - Andres Segovia

and email it back to anyone who might have put ya wrong.


Hope it hepls!
#3
At the moment I can't see the wood for the trees... sorry about that. It just wasn't obvious, but now you mention it...
#4
By the way, how can you tell if to strum or to pick out notes from the strings from the score?

(I think I need a very basic guide)
#5
Do you understand tab or notation?
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#7
Well, then it's time to learn. There are lessons on this site, use them. Or use Google.

But yeah, I can explain tab and notation briefly. A tab looks like this:

e|-----------0-----0--
B|---------0-------0--
G|-------1---------1--
D|-----2-----------2--
A|---2-------------2--
E|-0---------------0--


The lines are your strings. The thickest string of your guitar is the lowest line on tab and the thinnest string is the highest line. The numbers tell you which fret to play, for example if it says 2 on the second lowest line, it means you need to play the second fret of your A string. Fret number 0 means open string. If there are many numbers on top of each other, it means you need to play them at the same time (ie, strumming). If there are just single notes, you play single notes.

Notation is kind of like tab but it doesn't tell you which fret to play, it tells you which note to play. For example you can play the C note in different positions. But the upside of notation is that it applies to all instruments. Notation also tells you the rhythm that a tab alone can't tell. So notation is "universal", tab only applies to guitar. Again, notes on top of each other means that they are played at the same time. And single notes are single notes.

But to me it sounds like you have just started learning to play the guitar. I would suggest buying a beginners' guitar book. First learn to play a bit and then come here and ask questions (if you have any questions). It's also a lot easier to answer your questions if you already know something.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
ok, very many thanks for starting me off. I have seen this tab thing before when looking around. Just one question in your example: there are two sets of numbers for the frets, one at a diagonal the other in a straight line... going from what you said, am I right to think that the diagonal numbers are to be picked out individually and the straight line is a strum action?

So you example just shows two way of playing?
#9
^ Yes. The first one is an arpeggiated E major chord and the second one is an E major chord with all notes played at the same time.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#10
A question on 'notation' - is this what I think of as, 'written music' (ie it can be read), and consists of the fiver horizontal lines with the treble clef at the beginning of each line [set of lines]?
#11
Yeah.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#12
So 'tabs' look the better/easier way to 'read' music?

So if asked if you can rad music, it is legitimate and meaningful to say yes, you can read tab music?
#13
^^^ No, tabs are an inferior form of written music. Usually you can't tell how fast a song is or the length of different notes from tab.

Tab is still useful no doubt, but you cannot rely purely upin tab to recreate a piece of music, and you cannot claim to read music if you only read tab.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#14
So actually playing music on a guitar requires a broad understanding of music, such as tabs, such as proper written notes in notation plus recognising that you are actually playing what you are trying to play? Plus a whole lot of other skills no doubt?

I'm quite prepared to work for this, it's just that there doesn't seem to be a definite starting place in order to understand how to get off the ground, so to speak. I'm beginning to get an idea. I started to learn Spanish about four or five years ago, and back then I found the prospect very daunting, yet now I am passable with the language.

So to me, almost anything is possible, I am very optimistic.
Last edited by Pimmy Jage at Feb 23, 2014,
#16
Quote by Pimmy Jage
So actually playing music on a guitar requires a broad understanding of music, such as tabs, such as proper written notes in notation plus recognising that you are actually playing what you are trying to play? Plus a whole lot of other skills no doubt?

I'm quite prepared to work for this, it's just that there doesn't seem to be a definite starting place in order to understand how to get off the ground, so to speak. I'm beginning to get an idea. I started to learn Spanish about four or five years ago, and back then I found the prospect very daunting, yet now I am passable with the language.

So to me, almost anything is possible, I am very optimistic.



Tab is a cheat. It's a helpful one, but a cheat.
To play guitar, you don't need to know how to read, either notation or tabs. It's helpful for learning pieces of music, especially at first when you have an undeveloped ear. And reading is essential for certain genres like classical or jazz. But the average rock musician does not know how to read notation, and uses tab to quickly learn songs. But as noted, tab does not give you information like proper rhythm, speed, time signature or key. Think of it as the cliff's notes, rather than the novel.

Tab can be very helpful in getting started - you can learn the basic open and barre chord shapes from it and start learning songs fairly easily. But it depends on what you want to accomplish. If you want to be a weekend warrior, tab will be all you need. If you want to become a well-rounded musician, learning to read is useful, but you should also be learning theory, starting with intervals and the major/minor scales and chord construction. And if you want to become a true trained "musician," like someone with a university degree in performance, then sight-reading is essential. Tab goes out the window at that level.
#17
ok, this is great - I feel that I understand a lot more now about how to get started.

I can see exactly what you mean by tabs being useful in terms of speed of playing etc , but it makes me wonder how anyone can read sheet music! Must be very clever!

When I saw sheet music for the first time, I tried to make a comparison with the lines in tab. You can see why - the horizontal lines seemed to fit with guitar string. Of course, what I wasn't allowing for, which seems daft now, I'll admit, is that notation is for all instruments, even those without strings.

Daft beginner, eh?
#18
Reading the sheet music isn't that hard. People just don't bother learning it. I can read sheet music but not really well for guitar or bass (I play the trumpet too and that's how I learned to read music). It's all about starting to read music. You'll learn it if you just do it a lot.

I don't think tabs are useless. Sometimes they are handy if you want to know the exact chord voicing or something like that - sheet music can't show you which frets to play because the same note can be played in many different positions.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#19
I've been listening to some podcasts about guitar music theory, which I have found very interesting, and some of it even makes some sense! The podcaster (can't remember his name, something like, 'Desi Turner or Desi Serna?) says for a beginner the theory is not necessary, but I didn't have anything better to do, so listened anyway. He's very good, and its great fun to hear him put into practice what he teachers.

I feel a lot more confident about going out to buy a guitar, now.

I would buy 2nd hand, but I don't trust that I will get a good one, and at least if I go to a shop (there are two in my town), then it would be under a warranty of some kind, at least. Of course, I couldn't play it as such, but that's not the end of the world, is it?
#20
Yea, right at the beginning theory doesn't really matter. When you are first starting it's more important to just get used to the physical difficulties of playing and learning some basic songs and how to read tab. Later on is when you might want to get into music theory and maybe notation. They won't really be helpful until you are at the point where you're ready to start improvising and/or writing songs.

As for buying second hand instruments, you can get some really good ones, but if you don't know anything about guitars yet it's probably better to just go a actual music store and let someone help you.
#21
How important would anyone rate if a guitar has a cutaway? I understand whey it is there, but so many of the guitars I see for sale that have a cutaway are electro, and I'm not sure that's what I want.

I wanted a cutaway (for the reasons it is there), but not electro. So many more guitars without the cutaway seem not to have the electro function.

I'm finding the shopping almost as hard as anything else!
Last edited by Pimmy Jage at Feb 24, 2014,