Poll: Which way?
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View poll results: Which way?
three thousand five hundred
24 57%
thirty five hundred
18 43%
Voters: 42.
#1
Do you pronounce numbers in the thousands, say, 7,200 as "seven thousand two hundred (stupid way) or "Seventy two hundred (normal way).
I rarely hear people pronounce it the first way.
#2
depends on the context

like if i've been counting in hundreds it's weird to then say things in thousands



stratkat
#3
#cashthread
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#4
it depends on context, "seven thousand two hundred dollars" sounds better, "seventy two hundred people" sounds better
#5
Maybe just me but I always though Seventy-two hundred sounded American, I would have said Seven thousand two hundred was more common here in the U.k. Although that said something lower like fifteen hundred is used quite normally.
#6
I use both. Sometimes one way sounds better, sometimes the other, though I'm not certain what my criteria are for choosing which fits what circumstances.
#7
I pronounce the numbers in the thousands
You hit 'em and they get back up
I hit 'em and they stay down
- Frank Castle
#11
Quote by captainsnazz
it doesn't surprise me at all that you describe quantities of money in a totally retarded way.


eh. Money is all I do at my job. Sometimes I think its funny thinking 1 dollar is a skittle and think... "Man that guy wants a loan for 200,000 skittles"

and thinking of how someone is going to spend all those skittles helps the day go by a bit faster. I ****ing love skittles.
#12
I would say 1900 as "19 hundred", but referring to a number like 4700 as 47 hundred sounds a bit weird to me...
ERROR 0x45: Signature not found
#14
Quote by The4thHorsemen
I use both. Sometimes one way sounds better, sometimes the other, though I'm not certain what my criteria are for choosing which fits what circumstances.

Pretty much this.
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#15
Depends. I mostly say thirty five hundred though. Sometimes I don't even specify cause its obvious enough already.

"That house costs a hundred and twelve, not bad."
pinga
#16
Quote by cheesefries
eh. Money is all I do at my job. Sometimes I think its funny thinking 1 dollar is a skittle and think... "Man that guy wants a loan for 200,000 skittles"

and thinking of how someone is going to spend all those skittles helps the day go by a bit faster. I ****ing love skittles.

I meant mack, don't worry. Thinking of money as skittles is amazing
#17
Quote by EuBoat
depends on the context

like if i've been counting in hundreds it's weird to then say things in thousands


so would 2000 be twenty hundred
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#18
Quote by captainsnazz
I meant mack, don't worry. Thinking of money as skittles is amazing

It's not just me, pretty much everyone I know.
Maybe it's New York City dialect

Quote by theogonia777
so would 2000 be twenty hundred

Even thousands are said as even thousands, four thousand, seven thousand etc.
#19
Quote by macashmack
Even thousands are said as even thousands, four thousand, seven thousand etc.


no he doesn't say things in thousands so why would he say four thousand etc
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#20
Quote by sfaune92
I would say 1900 as "19 hundred", but referring to a number like 4700 as 47 hundred sounds a bit weird to me...



This. Anything above 1900 I just say as thousands. Doesn't really bother me though.
What really annoys me is people who drop words out of amounts, like "a couple things" or "one hundred five"

EDIT: Or yeah, "two thousand fourteen". There's a ****ing and in there!
Last edited by SkepsisMetal at Feb 21, 2014,
#22
I tend to count in there thousands, unless it's money.

Then I don't count.


Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise
#24
So much butthurt in those YouTube comments
dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#25
Until I saw the video I posted, I'd never actually realised that Americans didn't say the "and" in numbers. I think I heard it even though it wasn't there.
#26
Quote by sickman411
Until I saw the video I posted, I'd never actually realised that Americans didn't say the "and" in numbers. I think I heard it even though it wasn't there.

We're taught it's wrong.
#27
they're both the same. stop being a fag about it.
Most of the important things


in the world have been accomplished


by people who have kept on


trying when there seemed to be no hope at all
#29
Quote by sickman411
Until I saw the video I posted, I'd never actually realised that Americans didn't say the "and" in numbers. I think I heard it even though it wasn't there.

I was taught that and in a number implied a decimal point. So 1,000.1 is one-thousand and one, 1,001 is one-thousand one.
#30
Quote by Dirge Humani
I was taught that and in a number implied a decimal point. So 1,000.1 is one-thousand and one, 1,001 is one-thousand one.

Yeah, I was probably taught the British way. Not surprised since I guess British grammar/spelling conventions are probably considered the norm for teaching purposes (for non-native speakers, I mean).

Also, in Portuguese we say "and" for everything except between thousands and hundreds. For instance 2345 would be literally "two thousand three hundred and forty and five". So the same as the British version but with an extra "and" before units. So maybe that's why the "and" comes naturally to me.
#31
Thing is, we are taught that way, and people say that way, but nobody would assume that someone saying one thousand and one is meaning 1000.1 unless you were maybe in some sort of extremely precise technical environment. And even then it would probably be said one thousand point one.
#32
Quote by sickman411
Yeah, I was probably taught the British way. Not surprised since I guess British grammar/spelling conventions are probably considered the norm for teaching purposes (for non-native speakers, I mean).

Also, in Portuguese we say "and" for everything except between thousands and hundreds. For instance 2345 would be literally "two thousand three hundred and forty and five". So the same as the British version but with an extra "and" before units. So maybe that's why the "and" comes naturally to me.

See i'd say that without the and between four and five

So two thousand three hundred and forty five
You hit 'em and they get back up
I hit 'em and they stay down
- Frank Castle
#33
Yeah that's what I said. That I say it like the Portuguese version (which I translated literally) but without that one "and", i.e. the British version.
#34
It's no surprise brits love adding totally unnecessary shit to the words they say.

two thousand three hundred and forty AND five? are you ****ing kidding me?

or like adding the letter u

humoururuur

coulouurrrurrr

color godammit
pinga
#36
Quote by Cb4rabid
two thousand three hundred and forty AND five? are you ****ing kidding me?

I said that in Portuguese we say that "and", not in British English!!!!!
#37
My point remains, brits suck

oh wait sorry, I mean

my pouint still remainsu and briuuts still and suuck
pinga