#1
Ok so I always wanted one and finally, now, I would like to get one...

Any information on them appreciated...

A history lesson would be good, (so if you know anything please add...)

From wiki:

Wah-wah pedal

The Original:
Thomas Organ Cry Baby (1970) manufactured by JEN


A wah-wah pedal (or just wah pedal) is a type of guitar effects pedal that alters the tone of the signal to create a distinctive effect, mimicking the human voice. The pedal sweeps the peak response of a filter up and down in frequency to create the sound (spectral glide), also known as "the wah effect." The wah-wah effect originated in the 1920s, with trumpet or trombone players finding they could produce an expressive crying tone by moving a mute in the instrument's bell. This was later simulated with electronics for the electric guitar, controlled by movement of the player's foot on a rocking pedal connected to a potentiometer. Wah-wah effects are used when a guitarist is soloing, or creating a "wacka-wacka" funk styled rhythm.

History
A color image of a 1968 King Vox Wah pedal. The foot pedal is black with chrome accents and has a "King Vox Wah" label on the top.
A 1968 King Vox Wah pedal similar to one that was owned by Jimi Hendrix.

The first wah pedal was created by Brad Plunkett at Warwick Electronics Inc./Thomas Organ Company in November 1966. This pedal is the original prototype made from a transistorized MRB (mid-range boost) potentiometer bread-boarded circuit and the housing of a Vox Continental Organ volume pedal. The concept, however, was not totally new. Country guitar virtuoso Chet Atkins had used a similar, self-designed device on his late 1950s recordings of "Hot Toddy" and "Slinkey".

The creation of the wah pedal was actually an accident which stemmed from the redesign of the Vox Super Beatle guitar amplifier in 1966. Warwick Electronics Inc./Thomas Organ Company had bought the Vox name due to the brand name's popularity and association with the Beatles. Warwick Electronics Inc. also owned Thomas Organ Company and had assigned Thomas Organ Company to create a new product line called the all-electric Vox Amplifonic Orchestra; the project was headed by musician and bandleader Bill Page. While creating the Vox Amplifonic Orchestra, the Thomas Organ Company needed to re-design the Vox amplifier into a transistorized solid state amplifier, rather than tube, which would be less expensive to manufacture. During the re-design of the USA Vox amplifier, Stan Cuttler, head engineer of Thomas Organ Company, assigned Brad J. Plunkett, a junior electronics engineer, to replace the expensive Jennings 3-position MRB circuit switch with a transistorized solid state MRB circuit.

Plunkett had lifted and bread-boarded a transistorized tone-circuit from the Thomas Organ (an electric solid state transistorized organ) to duplicate the Jenning 3-position circuit. After adjusting and testing the amplifier with an electronic oscillator and oscilloscope, Plunkett connected the output to the speaker and tested the circuit audibly. At that point, several engineers and technical consultants, including Bill Page and Del Casher, noticed the sound effect caused by the circuit. Bill Page insisted on testing this bread-boarded circuit while he played his saxophone through an amplifier. John Glennon, an assistant junior electronics engineer with the Thomas Organ Company, was summoned to bring a volume control pedal which was used in the Vox Continental Organ so that the transistorized MRB potentiometer bread-boarded circuit could be installed in the pedal's housing. After the installation, Bill Page began playing his saxophone through the pedal and had asked Joe Banaron, CEO of Warwick Electronics Inc./Thomas Organ Company, to listen to the effect. At this point the first electric guitar was plugged into the prototype wah pedal by guitarist Del Casher who suggested to Joe Banaron that this was a guitar effects pedal rather than a wind instrument effects pedal. Joe Banaron, being a fan of the big band style of music, was interested in marketing the wah pedal for wind instruments as suggested by Bill Page rather than the electric guitar suggested by Del Casher. After a remark by Del Casher to Joe Banaron regarding the Harmon mute style of trumpet playing in the famous recording of "Sugar Blues" from the 1930s, Joe Banaron decided to market the wah-wah pedal using Clyde McCoy's name for endorsement.

After the initial invention of the wah pedal, the prototype pedal was then modified by Del Casher and Brad Plunkett to better accommodate the harmonic qualities of the electric guitar. However, since Vox had no intention of marketing the wah pedal for electric guitar players, the prototype wah-wah pedal was given to Del Casher for performances at Vox press conferences and film scores for Universal Pictures. The un-modified version of the Vox wah pedal was released to the public in February 1967 with an image of Clyde McCoy on the bottom of the pedal.

Warwick Electronics Inc. assigned Lester L. Kushner, an engineer with the Thomas Organ Company, and Bradley J. Plunkett to create and submit the documentation for the wah-wah pedal patent. The patent was submitted on February 24, 1967 which included technical diagrams of the pedal being connected to a four-stringed "guitar" (as noted from the "Description of the Preferred Embodiment"). Warwick Electronics Inc. was granted US patent 3530224 (foot-controlled continuously variable preference circuit for musical instruments) on September 22, 1970.

Early versions of the Clyde McCoy featured an image of McCoy on the bottom panel, which soon gave way to only his signature. Thomas Organ then wanted the effect branded as their own for the American market, changing it to Cry Baby which was sold in parallel to the Italian Vox V846. Thomas Organ's failure to trademark the Cry Baby name soon led to the market being flooded with Cry Baby imitations from various parts of the world, including Italy, where all of the original Vox and Cry Babys were made. Jen, who had been responsible for the manufacture of Thomas Organ and Vox wah pedals, also made rebranded pedals for companies such as Fender and Gretsch and under their own Jen brand. When Thomas Organ moved production completely to Sepulveda, California and Chicago, Illinois these Italian models continued to be made and are among the more collectible wah pedals today.

Some of the most famous electric guitarists of the day were keen to adopt wah-wah pedal soon after its release. Among the very first recordings released featuring wah-wah pedal were "Tales of Brave Ulysses" by Cream with Eric Clapton on guitar and "Burning of the Midnight Lamp" by Jimi Hendrix Experience, both released in 1967.
Other functions

Another function of the pedal is to use it to boost certain frequencies by keeping it in a single position, emphasizing the "sweet spot" in the tonal spectrum of an instrument.

The preeminent electric guitar player to use the pedal in this way was Jimi Hendrix, who revolutionized its application by combining a Fender Stratocaster with stacked Marshall Amplifiers (in both static and modulated mode) for lead/rhythm guitar applications unheard of before then. According to Del Casher, Hendrix learned about the pedal from Frank Zappa, another well-known early user.Milestones of this signature guitar and amplifier combination include songs such as "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" as well as the "Star Spangled Banner" which was played by Hendrix at Woodstock in 1969.


Thanks wiki...

Perhaps sticky material... Make it good

Thanks y'all
Last edited by fastforded at Feb 22, 2014,
#2
Michael Schenker also utilized the pedal in his work.

Mick Ronson used a CryBaby for the same purpose while recording The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars.

An envelope filter or envelope follower is often referred to as an auto-wah or T-wah--"T" as in "triggered" by the input signal's amplitude.

Another famous style of wah-wah playing is utilizing it for a percussive "wacka-wacka" effect by muting strings and moving the pedal at the same time. This was first heard on a song "Little Miss Lover" (1967) by Jimi Hendrix Experience. One of the most famous uses of this effect is heard on Isaac Hayes's "Theme from Shaft" (1971), Charles Pitts on guitar.

David Gilmour from Pink Floyd plugged in the pedal back to front to create the electronic screams found in the song 'Echoes'. This technique is sometimes called haw haw.
Other instruments
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Many bassists have also used the wah-wah effect, for example Michael Henderson on Miles Davis's album On the Corner (1972). Bassist Cliff Burton of Metallica used a Morley Wah pedal (along with a Big Muff Distortion) extensively, including on "(Anesthesia) Pulling Teeth", which is primarily a bass solo recorded for Kill 'Em All (1983), and "The Call of Ktulu" and "For Whom the Bell Tolls", both recorded for Ride the Lightning. Geezer Butler, bassist of Black Sabbath, used it when playing his solo "Bassically", along with the bass line in "N.I.B.". Chris Squire of Yes used a wah-wah pedal on his solo piece "The Fish" on the album Fragile. While wah pedals are less popular as a bass effect, various companies now offer pedals designed specifically for bass guitars.

John Medeski of Medeski, Martin, and Wood uses a Wah pedal with his Clavinet.

Many Steel Guitar players use a Wah-Wah, such as Robert Randolph from the Robert Randolph and the Family Band

Melvin Ragin better known by the nickname Wah-wah Watson, was a member of the Motown Records studio band, The Funk Brothers, where he recorded with artists like The Temptations, The Jackson 5, The Four Tops, Gladys Knight & The Pips, and The Supremes. He played on numerous sessions in the 1970s and 1980s for many top soul, funk and disco acts, including Herbie Hancock.

Keyboardists have also made use of the wah-wah effect both in the studio and during live performances. Garth Hudson famously used a wah-wah pedal on a clavinet in The Band song "Up on Cripple Creek" to emulate a Jaw Harp. Rick Wright of Pink Floyd played a Wurlitzer electric piano through a wah-wah pedal in their song "Money" to give the impression of many consecutive chords being played. Jordan Rudess of Dream Theater made an extensive use of the wah-wah pedal on Dream Theater's album Train of Thought.

Many jazz fusion records feature wind and brass instruments with the effect - Miles Davis's trumpet being a well-known example. Davis first used this technique in 1970 (at concerts documented on Live-Evil and The Cellar Door Sessions) at a time when he also made his keyboard players (Keith Jarrett, Chick Corea) play electric pianos with a wah-wah pedal. Napoleon Murphy Brock played a saxophone amplified through a wah-wah pedal in the Frank Zappa movie The Dub Room Special, as well as on some of Zappa's albums. David Sanborn can be heard playing an alto saxophone modified by a wah-wah pedal on the David Bowie album Young Americans. Noted saxophonist King Curtis was also known to use a wah-wah pedal. Dick Sims, the keyboard player with Eric Clapton in the late 1970s, used a Hammond organ in conjunction with a wah-wah pedal, sat on top of the organ operated by his palm.

The effect is also extensively used with the electric violin. Notable examples are Jerry Goodman with the Mahavishnu Orchestra, and Jean-Luc Ponty, Don "Sugarcane" Harris and Shankar, with Frank Zappa, all usually engaged in long wah-wah violin/guitar duels. Boyd Tinsley of Dave Matthews Band is known to use a wah-wah pedal live.
#3
Wikipedia and google search already exist, we're not going to sticky something you just copy/pasted from another site. If you want help finding a wah, give us your budget, current gear, and what types of genres/sounds/bands/etc you're trying to cover.
#4
Quote by Roc8995
Wikipedia and google search already exist, we're not going to sticky something you just copy/pasted from another site. If you want help finding a wah, give us your budget, current gear, and what types of genres/sounds/bands/etc you're trying to cover.


I saw this http://www.jimdunlop.com/product/sc95-slash-crybaby-classic

Budget under $200?

Genre: hard rock...

and it really wouldnt be for me, it would be for anyone looking to find a wah-wah. And yep, I found like 5 different "Best Wah" articles already... Always so much information... figured I'd ask around.. instead of an OVERLOAD of articles that I think are made to promote a "name" or "brand" instead of what really works... wanted something User approved...
#5
How is copy/pasting a wikipedia article helping with the information overload? There's almost nothing in there that would help someone pick a wah.

This is why we usually have people post individual threads for gear questions. It seems impractical to try to aggregate ever piece of relevant information in one thread. People generally do some basic research themselves and then ask more specific questions in their own threads. It works pretty well
#6
A veteran guitarist once told me that for a wah, your best deal is getting something basic, functional and well built- 99% of all guitarists don't need all the bells & whistles found on the modern boutique/sig model wah peals.

So look a sub-$100 Dunlop or some such.
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#7
The morley bad horsie 2 looks like a favorite around here.
It's actually pretty smart being optical instead of mechanical, so you don't have broken pots from too much use (or abuse, for that matter), and it costs less than most of the other wah's I find around.
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#8
funny thread. OP if the folks responding to your ? don't know the basics of a wah then the advice would be useless.

I'd suggest a Morley. personally I use either a Morley Classic or a Morley Power Wah. both are solid pedals that work great and don't suffer from some of the issues that a more conventional wah like a Dunlop Cry-baby does in time.
#9
Don´t let the name fool you, the Dimebag Crybaby Wah can do it all. I ended up getting it, sounds amazing, doesn´t colour your sound as much as many other wahs, and the adjustable sweep means you can tweak it to your preferences.

See if you can find one used on the cheap, that´s what I did.
WTLTL 2011
#10
Quote by dannyalcatraz
A veteran guitarist once told me that for a wah, your best deal is getting something basic, functional and well built- 99% of all guitarists don't need all the bells & whistles found on the modern boutique/sig model wah peals.

So look a sub-$100 Dunlop or some such.


yep, just more crap to break.

I believe the Cry Baby® Wah Wah GCB95 would be the classic, best, and simplest wahwah ever.

Its the music, not really the equipment, that matters.

But we do need our tools...
#11
I'm a big Morley fan. I use a PWA which has the switch beside the pedal. Morley also make the switchless variety. Which suits you most depends on how you use it. If you like to find a sweet spot sometimes (say, for pinch harmonics) and leave it there and just switch it on and off then a switchless one is useles. If however, you need to be able to switch it on and off fast and only use it for actual wah then grab a switchless one like a bad horsie.
It is a very personal thing though. The other night I misplaced my Morley and had to use my rhythm guitarist's crybaby. I didn't like it. It sounded ok but I didn't like the way the pedal swept the frequencies. Others hate the way Morleys work, you have to try them out yourself. Beginners usually prefer crybabies and often complain that Morleys require too much technique but even that's not a hard and fast rule. Different people like different things.
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#12
I'm in the Morley camp. Love my Bad Horsie 2. I'm not a huge Crybaby fan. They sound good, but I prefer the switchless spring-loaded operation of the Morley.
Gibson SG Standard
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#13
I have a GC95 in my pedal board. Its a nice wah, it does what its supposed to do and it does it well...My only problem is when its in the down position it darkens the signal like hell and I wish it was a little brighter...but that's just me, what can you do.
Gear:
1987 Charvel Model II
2010 Carvin ST300C
1990 Charvette 100
1991 Ibanez RG560M
2006 Fender Mexi Strat
Jackson/Charvel Star W/ Custom Graphics.
Ovation CP 247 Acoustic
Line 6 POD HD Pro X
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#14
Quote by classicrocker01
I'm in the Morley camp. Love my Bad Horsie 2. I'm not a huge Crybaby fan. They sound good, but I prefer the switchless spring-loaded operation of the Morley.


That was my first wah! I got rid of it after like a week because I couldn't get used to the sweep. I wonder how I'd like it now...but I'm very happy with my Dimebag Crybaby.
WTLTL 2011
#15
^I've had thing since probably 2006. Now I can't get used to the sweep on a Crybaby


Although one day if I have the cash laying around I might give the Dime one a go.
Gibson SG Standard
Gibson Les Paul Traditional
Cort Explorer
Squire Standard Strat rebuilt with Fender USA parts
Squire Tele
Krank 1980
Orange Tiny Terror
Traynor YCV 50 Blue
Peavey Vypyr 75

Will fly for food. Call me Dylan
#16
DOD FX17 if you can find one. It's an awesome wah/volume pedal and isn't much bigger than your standard Boss pedal. You can also tweak the pots on it.

anyway, i'd still suggest trying a few before deciding. Nobody can tell you the "best wah" because there isn't one. Asking 10 different people will get you 10 different answers.
#17
I think the biggest thing is to find a wah with the kind of sweep you like. Try a few out and see which ones sound the best to you. Personally, I never really liked the Vox ones or most of the Crybabies but I really like the 595q. It's pretty adjustable. You can just play around with the knobs and get different sounds.
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#18
Quote by Green_Ghoul
DOD FX17 if you can find one. It's an awesome wah/volume pedal and isn't much bigger than your standard Boss pedal. You can also tweak the pots on it.

anyway, i'd still suggest trying a few before deciding. Nobody can tell you the "best wah" because there isn't one. Asking 10 different people will get you 10 different answers.


Found them on GC's used website for 79.99 and on Ebay for 99.99, if its good as you say it is...it ain't horribly expensive.
Gear:
1987 Charvel Model II
2010 Carvin ST300C
1990 Charvette 100
1991 Ibanez RG560M
2006 Fender Mexi Strat
Jackson/Charvel Star W/ Custom Graphics.
Ovation CP 247 Acoustic
Line 6 POD HD Pro X
Pro Tools 9

Tutorial: Studio Quality Programmed Drum Sounds
#19
They're my favourite wah pedals, the only downside is it took me a while to tweak it to how I like. It's one that I'll never get rid of.