#2
You get the "respective sound" from the harmony.

C Ionian = Key of C
C Dorian = Key of Bb
and so on and so on.

The article is trying to teach modes through their basic chord usage.

C ionian for the I chord in C major
C dorian for the ii chord in Bb major...

Btw this info is in the article. go read it again.
Last edited by Deadds at Feb 23, 2014,
#3
That lesson teaches you the patterns to the modes but doesn't teach you to actually achieve the sound by making it resolve on the proper note. For instance, it teaches you the notes to C Lydian (C, D, E, F#, G, A, B), but without the proper harmony or backing you'll probably just hear regular old G major (G, A, B, C, D, E, F#), or maybe even E minor (E, F#, G, A, B, C, D). You need a chord progression that wants to resolve in a certain place.

Do you have any way to record, or maybe even a tablature program (Guitar Pro, Tux Guitar, etc.)? Trying recording a chord progression that is Emin - F, back and forth, and then play in E Phrygian on top of it. You should get a distinctly Phrygian sound. Or Record a chord progression that is C - D, back and forth, and play in C Lydian. That should get you a Lydian sound. The trick in those two examples is that you're getting a tonic (root) chord to resolve on, and then the second chord highlights the distinguishing note (in the first progression, the F chord highlights the minor 2nd of the phrygian mode, and in the second the D highlights the augmented 4th of the lydian mode).
#4
Quote by Deadds
You get the "respective sound" from the harmony.


Correct.

Quote by Deadds
C Ionian = Key of C
C Dorian = Key of Bb
and so on and so on.

The article is trying to teach modes through their basic chord usage.

C ionian for the I chord in C major
C dorian for the ii chord in Bb major...


Incorrect, you are simply using the C major scale in all of your examples. Have a listen to yourself playing these examples, you won't be able to hear any "modal sound" there as no accidentals are being employed, and there is no harmony implying a mode because your examples use chords diatonic to the key.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#5
Quote by AlanHB
Correct. Incorrect, you are simply using the C major scale in all of your examples. Have a listen to yourself playing these examples, you won't be able to hear any "modal sound" there as no accidentals are being employed, and there is no harmony implying a mode because your examples use chords diatonic to the key.


C dorian is not C major.

I'm just using mode names in respect to the finger shapes in the article, plus the article mentions that C Ionian is just C major and that C dorian is just the Bbmajor scale starting on C.
#6
^^^ What I mean to say is that you are simply using the major scale. In the key of Bb, if you play the C dorian scale, you are just playing the Bb major scale. There's no benefit using modes in this fashion, it's just calling the major scale something else.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#7
TS, it's all about the key center. If the center is C all the time, you'll hear the difference between different modes. So drone a C note and first play the C major scale over it, then play the C dorian scale, C phrygian, C lydian, C mixo and C minor. They all sound different and this way you'll hear the differences. The way I think the modes of the major scale is not the major scale starting on this and this note. I think dorian scale as a minor scale with a major 6th, phrygian scale as a minor scale with a minor 2nd, lydian scale as a major scale with an augmented 4th and mixolydian scale as a major scale with a minor 7th. There's always just one note difference between the modal scale and the major or minor scale.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#8
Quote by villanovablues
I cannot seem to give each mode its respective sound.

http://www.guitarcats.com/content/7-modes-major-scale -- here is where I learned about modes <> can someone look at it and tell me if it is correct? (I've read other articles that kinda contradict some points in this, so I am a bit confused).


The first question to be asked when talking about modes is why do you want to learn modes? What do you expect it to add to your playing?

So to start, recognize that is probably something you don't need to study.

Modes are far, far less useful than most people seem to think they are. And they are confusing. So it's not surprising if you are struggling with them a bit.

For starters, the whole process of thinking of a mode in terms of the relative major scale is not helpful. That's not how modes are used. eg, it is NOT helpful to think of D Mixolydian as being the notes of G major.

The useful (marginally) way to think of modes is to think of them as variations on the PARALLEL major or minor scale. eg, D Mixolydian is D major with a flat 7th. G Dorian is G minor with a sharp sixth.

Now, this still creates confusion because it reinforces the notion that somehow you need to change scales to acommodate different notes. This is not true. Quite the contrary - a better way to think of it is to develop an awareness of accidentals: you can play a b7 in a major scale all the time, and it doesn't require a new scale. It just requires knowledge of where your intervals are. Functionally, this is far more useful.
Last edited by HotspurJr at Feb 25, 2014,
#9
Modes get their individual sounds from the presence of certain intervals from the tonic, such as the #4 in the Lydian. A #4 is not found in the major or minor scale, so the listener will notice the difference in sound.

To hear the effect you need to establish and maintain the tonic in the harmony; maybe by droning the tonic note, or by not straying away from the tonic chord for long (e.g. a two chord vamp).

Your example lesson says things like "C Lydian: G major scale over the C root", which is not the way I like to visualise and think of modes. I would prefer to think it as "C Lydian: C major scale with a raised 4th degree"

The easiest way of learning the characteristic sounds of each mode is to drone the low E string of the guitar and play a melody using the modal scale on the high E string*.

* with E as the tonic, of course.
Last edited by Jehannum at Feb 27, 2014,
#10
I'm no legend but I believe to access the modes you need to create a modal chord cycle and forget using the scale box template. there are lots of improvisation rules I know nothing about, I heard a rumor you can play a minor pentatonic a 4th above any root chord, never got it to work. My life is miserable.
#11
Quote by batfink84
I'm no legend but I believe to access the modes you need to create a modal chord cycle and forget using the scale box template. there are lots of improvisation rules I know nothing about, I heard a rumor you can play a minor pentatonic a 4th above any root chord, never got it to work. My life is miserable.


This works if your root chord is minor. Assume the tonic (and thusly the key) are A minor. Your notes are A, B, C, D, E, F, G. The Fourth is D. The notes of D minor pentatonic are D, F, G, A, C, which as you can see, all fits.

I use this as a tool to help me memorize the fretboard. I typically think about the fretboard by just knowing the intervals rather than seeing box patterns, but this information gives me an extra little short cut, because now I know that if I'm in A minor, both the A minor pentatonic box patterns and the D minor pentatonic patterns are available to me.

I only use this if I'm intentionally going for a pentatonic sound. Otherwise I wouldn't want to drop out notes from a scale (by making it pentatonic, rather than the whole 7 note scale), so I would just know that while in A minor, the patterns for D dorian also work. Being able to quickly and intuitively connect modes like that (even while knowing that you're not playing modal music) is a great way to memorize the fretboard. For instance, say I'm playing in A phrygian, mostly around the 5th fret of the E string. But now I want to be able to play up by the 12th fret. This would be going up a 5th, and I know that starting from the 5th of phrygian gives me locrian, so at the 12th fret I know that E locrian is available to me. This isn't playing modal music of course, but it's been an invaluable tool for memorizing the fretboard.
#12
Quote by batfink84
I'm no legend but I believe to access the modes you need to create a modal chord cycle and forget using the scale box template.

That is one way to do it, yes.