#1
Just a topic I was kind of interested to hear some other opinions about. Post spots in pieces where you love the orchestration, whether it's an orchestra, chamber ensemble, or just any group of musicians.

For me, first, in Mendelssohn's A Midsummer Night's Dream overture, where (around 3:20) he has the strings and the brass sort of battle against each other over this V9/V chord, followed by the V9 chord.

http://youtu.be/SEkcP8lZvZA?t=3m15s

Another is pretty much everything about Ravel's Daphnis Et Chloe suite. OF all the classical concerts I've gone to, that one by far was the one that left me the most blown away.

Also, although this isn't exactly like the others I've named, in De Falla's "La Vida Breve: Danza Espagnola No. 1," which was originally for orchestra, there's this one really cool section where you have instruments echoing the main melody, and I really like how it translated to John Williams and Julian Bream's duo guitar arrangement (at around 1:10).

http://youtu.be/uhZ1lTLgb5Y?t=1m6s

I also just love the counterpoint in a few sections of that piece.
Last edited by The Madcap at Feb 23, 2014,
#2
I really really love Ravel's String Quartet in F. It's very unique and reminds me of a brisk autumn night. The way the melodies play on each other is great, and the pizzicato is perfectly placed.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=ehQMe57TPPM


Speaking of French composers, Debussy's String Quartet was also magnificent, particularly the second movement.
www.youtube.com/watch?v=BMibKxO5J5Q


Oh and this one is a little out of place, but this particular overture is amazing as well. Especially around the 1:10 mark.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=_EQKotmRua8
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#3
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VDOpPQ2rkfw

Ravel's String Quartet is a clinic in how to make a quartet sound massive. I actually don't like it from an orchestrational standpoint because of that. I appreciate more austere string writing in quartets. Still have to give mad props though.
EDIT: ^Beat me to it.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ysuddlMbW9U
His use of unisons here is just so striking. Specifically around the 4:00 mark where each instrument is in such a gorgeous register.