#1
Is it ok to play chords differently so that it makes it easier to switch chords?

For example Em is played with the first finger on the A string and the second on the D string.

However when moving from A to Em I find it easier to play the Em with the first finger on the D string and the second on the A string.

Is this bad practice? Should you only play chords in the traditional positions?

Or is it ok?
#2
As long as you're not damaging your hands and it sounds good it doesn't matter at all.
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#3
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
As long as you're not damaging your hands and it sounds good it doesn't matter at all.

This. Eventually you'll play the chords so many times it won't matter and finger substitution will become second nature.
#4
Quote by reckless_82
Is it ok to play chords differently so that it makes it easier to switch chords?

For example Em is played with the first finger on the A string and the second on the D string.

However when moving from A to Em I find it easier to play the Em with the first finger on the D string and the second on the A string.

Is this bad practice? Should you only play chords in the traditional positions?

Or is it ok?



I've always played it with my 2nd and 3rd fingers. That makes a lot of sense to me, because I can simply place one finger down, and it is now E Major.

I think you can play how you like, but, just be mindful that you may be putting yourself in a corner down the line, when it comes to switching to certain chords. Many times, the ergonomics are worked out and came out the way they did because of their usefulness in transitioning to other chords.

For example I don't play an A in the traditional inline 3 finger position. My dad was an old rock n roll guy who showed me how much more sense it would be to learn A where the 1st finger was on the G string, the 2nd finger on the D string and the 3rd on the B string. Cramped at first, it soon became so much easier/logical to switch between many chords that are commonly played alongside A.

So, your choice, as long as doing so doesn't inhibit you in the future.

Best,

Sean
#5
I think it's ok, but more as a special case, where it's blantantly easier to use an alternate fingering based on the chord you're coming from or going to. I like to use consistent fingering when I can, so I can build a single reflex for each chord where I can just think "A-minor" (or better yet, hear it in my head), and the reflex just takes my fingers there. That's easier to develop if you're always using the same fingering.
#6
It's best to think of the chords as the actual notes rather than specific fingers. Over time you'll naturally use fingerings that work best in particular songs or progressions.