#1
Hello everyone, I generally stay in the GG&A forum but I'm wanting to start recording. I have read the sticky so everyone knows . First off, I wish be using reaper since I've heard good things, it has all the features I need, and lots of people on here use it so that would help minor trouble shooting if need be. So off to my questions. I'm looking into the focusrite interfaces. I was wondering if I get the two input interface which would be perfect for recording everything except drums, if I could mic my drums into my Carvin PA mixer and then run an out from the mixer to the interface instead of having to buy the 18i20. I know a downside of this would be having to pretty much have the drums mixed and where I want them before laying down the track and any post production would affect the entire track whereas with the 18i20, each tom, snare, overhead and all that would be individual tracks which would allow more freedom to add effects to say the snare or eq a certain mic from the drums. If the Pa thing will work then I guess I need to weigh out whether the money is worth the extra feature to me.

Second question: I've always had great experiences with carvin gear and was curious whether anyone has experience with their studio head phones. Price is good and they would be used to monitor as I'm laying down tracks. I will be investing is some studio monitors for mixing but the album I'm recording will take a lot of time so that's a thread for another day unless these headphones would do well for that. If these aren't a good set, does anyone have some they would highly suggest for <100 to 150. I could stretch that if it would eliminate the need to put 500 or so into monitors later. I want something really flat and would love a good amount of sound rejection from outside since I don't have a huge workspace. I'm turning my 12'Wx30'Lx8'H sunroom that is never used into a studio so I need to be able to monitor what I'm recording along with the other tracks while my Mesa is running hot enough to get the sounds I'm wanting since I can't Isolate it.

Like I said, I think I have done quite a bit of my research on here and the interwebz prior to this and think what I have in mind will be once I dampen the room. Please post any help, questions, concerns, or advice on getting started because a buddy and me have been writing and brainstorming for two years on an album and I want it to turn out really well. Also, I know nothing about computers or what RAM and stuff I would need to prevent problems. I believe since the interface has outputs for monitoring, I shouldn't have latency issues right?


Sorry for the long post, like I said I have not recorded more than just a room mic recording a band for just rough demos.

Could also use help on drum mics. Looked into the Carvin ones then would have a could sm57s for the snare and maybe high hats. Would the two overhead condenser mics pick up the ride well or just the crashes/splash. If I could get the interface <300, headphones <150 (maybe <250 or so if I could get good results mixing with them) along with a couple sm57s, an sm58 or possibly a condenser to record vocals if there is something better for the same price range, and keep the drum mics under <500 considering Ill have the 57s to help I will be a very happy man.

Ill probably have to buy a computer to use just for recording unless my old desktop would work which I doubt which I why I asked for specs but I'm sure I can google that info just didn't think about it until I was typing the longest thread I've ever typed.
Ibanez SIR27
Pod HD500x

RIP:
Mesa Boogie Roadster 2x12 combo
Cmatmods analog chorus, phaser, tremoglo, signa drive, butah, and deeelay
walrus Audio Descent
#2
Plugging stuff into your mixer then the mixer into the interface will mean you only end up with 2 channels. Trying to mix 2 channels of drums isn't gonna really be good enough, you'd be better off just buying a bigger interface and using that, compression, eq and all these things are needed for a great sounding kit really. Yes you can do a lot of the sound straight from the mics, but it will never be perfect that way depending on what you're going for, if you want a really small sounding old school kit then it's fine, but modern rock and things of that nature will need track separation. If you really want to use the PA pre's you can but you'll need a much bigger interface than two inputs.
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#3
Wow man, I'm glad to see you want to start recording, but you might wanna slow down and start with simple recordings before you spend a tone of money and redecorate your room for it.

Any modern computer will record just fine, perferbly 4 gb of ram, and a dual core cpu that is at least 2.5 ghz. Other than that, your interface will take care of the rest. As for interfaces, I'd recommend the Focusrite Scarellt 2I4 just to start with, works fine for me.

But if you can get the 18I20 then go ahead, but your computer might not be able to handle all the inputs at once at minimum specs.
#4
1. Yes - Sure, you can do that. Sounds like you already know the cons of doing such, so if you're okay with it, then go for it. Personally, unless I had outboard compressors for the PA, i wouldn't consider doing this at all, but if it suits your needs, then by all means, go for it. Personally, I'd rather program drums in that case.

2. I have no experience with Carvin headphones, but from my experience with their live sound gear, it'll be okay, but nothing spectacular. I'd highly suggest you look into a pair of Audio Technica ATH-M50s, instead. They are the best headphones you can get for this sort of thing, short of $3-400 - I'd almost feel comfortable mixing entirely on them, if I had to. If you'll be wearing them for long periods of times, maybe look at the Beyerdynamic DT770 Pro, instead. They're not as flat as the M50s, but they are INSANELY comfortable, so you'll be able to wear them much longer without fatiguing, which could be much more beneficial in the long run.

3. No, just because the interface has outputs for monitoring doesn't mean you won't have latency. Assuming your computer is somewhat modern and you won't be using a ton of virtual instruments, most anything will work. Ideally, you'd want 4+ GB of RAM, a quad-core processor and at least a 7200 RPM hard drive, but I know guys recording on computers that were made for Windows XP, still.

4. If you don't already have the 57s, check out the GLS ES57 for tom and snare mics. I actually prefer them to SM57s on many things. They're dirt cheap and super rugged, too. Also, look into the CAD TSM411 - I actually use these on drums 90% of the time now, because they just work. They're also really cheap and sound fantastic. For kick, there's not really many cheap mics out there that I'd suggest, they all make it sound like cardboard. Grab a used Shure Beta 52A if you can, or an Audix D6 if you're going for a metal sound.

5. Yes, two overheads are fine for capturing all the cymbals, its very rare that you really need to use more than that - on the cheap you can pick up a pair of Samson CO2s, or if you want to go with something better, a pair of Rode NT5s or Oktava MK012s. Another option is the CAD M177 or M179, great mics for cheap (and you can use them for vocals, too)!

6. For vocals, it depends on the sound you're going for - Is this for singing or screaming? For singing, I'd generally prefer a nice condenser mic (though, my voice still seems to work best on a Shure SM7b) and for screams, I'd likely choose a dynamic. An SM57 or 58 here would be my last choice for recording. The 58 is a terrible sounding mic IMO. For a cheap condenser - check out the MXL V67G and the Audio Technica AT4040 (used). You could also buy two of either of these and they would double as your overhead mics, though the V67G would probably be less than ideal there, as it's really set up more for vocals than anything. For a dynamic, try a Heil PR40 or PR30, I'd suggest a Shure SM7b, but the preamps in the Focusrite don't have enough gain to power one adequately. This mic could also double as a bass drum mic.
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#5
Ok so for drums this kit: http://www.musiciansfriend.com/drum-microphone-packages/cad-premium-4-piece-drum-microphone-pack. 150 for three of the tsm411s and a kick mic that if I don't like Ill just get a beta52. Plus it costs the same as only two of the 411s so one of them and the kick mic is free. Also found the Samson's you mentioned for 100 for the pair. Is that a good price.

Ill do more research on the other mics.


To Ethan: Well we have been working and writing for over two years. We have a huge project ready that we are willing to put the money into to get a good finished product. I'm willing to put in the time for the learning curve but I have been around recording for a little while and know barely enough to know I don't want to cheap out on something that just won't do what I want then still shell out this money. I have a good job and music is my only hobby/side job with regular gigs, so I willing to put in the investment because the stuff I will buy should last and do me well for a long time. Also thank you for the info on the comp specs, that was very helpful and I will start looking for something to fit the bill.

I believe ill just get the 18i20. Dunno about having to put in the long hours to get the sound just right and mixed before laying down the track then having pretty much no control afterwards. Plus I have a 5 year old that loves to twist those damn knobs.


EDIT: the shure 57s I was only planning on getting the for recording guitar since those are what Ive always used gigging. If there is a better mic to get a better guitar tone and use for vocals I would be will to but the 300 or maybe some more that I would have put into all the shures into one mic that would do better.
Ibanez SIR27
Pod HD500x

RIP:
Mesa Boogie Roadster 2x12 combo
Cmatmods analog chorus, phaser, tremoglo, signa drive, butah, and deeelay
walrus Audio Descent
Last edited by bluestratplayer at Feb 26, 2014,
#6
Yes, that's a decent deal on that set of mics. The TSM411s were on sale for the Stupid Deal of the Day a few days ago for $30 and were the same price on Amazon, was gonna pick up some more, but I already own 4 and have no idea what I'd need more for...

^SM57 is a classic on guitar, and what I use most of the time, still (the GLS ES57 will work just as well). Though - if you want an all-purpose mic that will work very well in many different ways... the Heil PR30 sounds amazing on guitars, and great on vocals and bass drum (floor toms, as well), too! At the price of the GLS, you could get both and do a 2-mic setup on your Roadster.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
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www.SanctityStudios.com
#7
That sounds interesting. How hard is it to set up two mics at the same time, I've heard that some phase issues can occur, anything to keep in mind if I go that route

Edit: I also really like the look of those headphones. and they have a detachable chord so if one goes bad, not a problem so seams like a cool feature and the reviews sound like I may be able to mix with these too. Will those mics you rec'd for the dual miccing work well on the snare and high hats and vocals. If so it seems like I'll be pretty much set.
Ibanez SIR27
Pod HD500x

RIP:
Mesa Boogie Roadster 2x12 combo
Cmatmods analog chorus, phaser, tremoglo, signa drive, butah, and deeelay
walrus Audio Descent
Last edited by bluestratplayer at Feb 26, 2014,
#8
Holy crap that GLS is only 35 buck. Damn Im ordering it now.

Oops sorry for double post


any input on the Carvin tube mic. Heard some pretty cool stuff about it but like a lot of carvin stuff it seems you have to take a chance a lot of the time since a lot of their stuff flies under the radar.
Ibanez SIR27
Pod HD500x

RIP:
Mesa Boogie Roadster 2x12 combo
Cmatmods analog chorus, phaser, tremoglo, signa drive, butah, and deeelay
walrus Audio Descent
Last edited by bluestratplayer at Feb 26, 2014,
#9
Quote by bluestratplayer
That sounds interesting. How hard is it to set up two mics at the same time, I've heard that some phase issues can occur, anything to keep in mind if I go that route

Edit: I also really like the look of those headphones. and they have a detachable chord so if one goes bad, not a problem so seams like a cool feature and the reviews sound like I may be able to mix with these too. Will those mics you rec'd for the dual miccing work well on the snare and high hats and vocals. If so it seems like I'll be pretty much set.

Pretty easy, just set up the mics on the same speaker. You have a phase reverse switch in your recording software for a reason

Typical Fredman micing technique is 1 SM57 on-axis, with the second pointed toward the first, off-axis at a 45* angle. Can sound pretty huge!

Forgot that they just revamped the M50 with a detachable cable. Definitely a cool feature!

Quote by bluestratplayer
Holy crap that GLS is only 35 buck. Damn Im ordering it now.

Oops sorry for double post


any input on the Carvin tube mic. Heard some pretty cool stuff about it but like a lot of carvin stuff it seems you have to take a chance a lot of the time since a lot of their stuff flies under the radar.

Yep, they're dirt cheap, haha. I use them as drum mics when the drummer is a heavy hitter, since they're so cheap to replace if one gets broken (though, I've yet to have that happen!).

TBH, I'd be weary about anything that says it's "tube" for under ~$500. Doesn't mean that Carvin mic doesn't sound good... but it's definitely not a true tube circuit... kinda like how a Marshall Valvestate is a "tube" amp

If you want a GREAT tube mic, for cheap - the Stellar CM-6 are CM-5 is utterly fantastic and you can probably find one fairly cheap used, if you keep an eye out. They are clones of the Neumann U47 (CM-6) and the AKG C12 (CM-5) and hold their weight against mics 3-4 times their price.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#10
Depends on how serious you're on recording drums. Stereo interface won't be too good in instances where you want to manipulate the drum tracks in the DAW as you'd be fairly limited, so you might need more direct channels. In my experience to really be happy with drum tracks you need about 12 tracks, even though I've been known to use more (or less if no space).

I think to track drums you'd need a minimum of 4 open channels on an audio card, considering that you have a mixer.

What I mean is that snare and kick can go direct into chan1 and chan2, while a stereo submix of overheads, room mics and toms can go into chan3 and chan4.
If you play with a band you'd probably need at least one more open channel so you can isolate the rest of the instruments so might as well at least get a 8 channel audio interface so you can do chan.1 kick, chan.2 snare, chan3+4 toms stereo, chan. 5+6 OH stereo, chan 7 +8 open for band.

Carvin stuff is fine but I'd use probably more tried and true manufacturers when it comes to headphones and mics. If we're talking budget, I like the Samson packs (5 or 8kit). They're not top of the line but for what they are on a budget I find quite good.

The Senn DRUMKIT600 package is about 30% better in sound but the price is quite different.

As far as headphones go, I like the AKG K240:
http://www.epinions.com/reviews/akg_k_240_studio_headband_headphones_black

In a pinch I might get the K99s instead.

If you'll have high level of drum spill you might also get closed-back ISO headphones so you can hear what it really sound while a drummer is banging away or a guitarist is tearing it up (something like this):
http://www.epinions.com/prices/vic_firth_sih1_headband_headphones_black
http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/371002754899

I wouldn't use any of these iso headphones for critical mixing but for high volume situations where you can't hide behind the mixing glass they work well.
Last edited by diabolical at Feb 26, 2014,
#11
diabolical: I thought the focusrite with all its inputs would allow me to record each mic on a separate labeled track then I can do whatever with those track on the DAW. Am I totally off?

Matrix: never noticed a phase reverse lol. I guess that's a "well there's your problem" moment. I was just curious about the carvin, for now I would rather put that 220 bucks into a good condenser mic

Thank you everyone for the help, for once I feel like I'm on the right track.
Ibanez SIR27
Pod HD500x

RIP:
Mesa Boogie Roadster 2x12 combo
Cmatmods analog chorus, phaser, tremoglo, signa drive, butah, and deeelay
walrus Audio Descent
#13
Here is the list so far:
Focusrite 18i20 500
Audio Technica ATH-M50s 170
GLS ES57 (4) 140
CAD TSM411 (3) part of premium 4 pack 150
Shure Beta 52A 190
Heil PR30 275
Samson CO2 (2) for overheads used 100

$1525 total

Anything else I should consider outside of some extra mic stands and cables.

edit forgot the heil pr
Ibanez SIR27
Pod HD500x

RIP:
Mesa Boogie Roadster 2x12 combo
Cmatmods analog chorus, phaser, tremoglo, signa drive, butah, and deeelay
walrus Audio Descent
Last edited by bluestratplayer at Feb 26, 2014,
#14
I've found that the key to taking the amateurish edge of a recording is all about the vocals and the vocals are all about the mic. Play with it in post production all you like, the key factor is the mic. Now who can afford a good condensor mic? **** nobody is who. Hire one. Get everything ready to lay down the vocals so you can do them in one day and hire something really good like Neumann for a day.
Everything else can be done on the cheap but not the vocals. Hiring is the trick for the financially challenged. This is of course for stuff you intend to be used for serious recordings that you are hoping to sell and such, not youtube guff.
I spent years trying to dress up vocals recorded on an SM58 and they were never right. Then one day somebody brought a Neumann U87 into the studio and it was instant "So that was the missing ingredient - a proper vocals condensor microphone. It seems so obvious now."
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#15
that sounds like a good solution. I mean I live an hour and a half from Nashville. Getting some studio time here and there for vocals is well within reach if I don't like my results
Ibanez SIR27
Pod HD500x

RIP:
Mesa Boogie Roadster 2x12 combo
Cmatmods analog chorus, phaser, tremoglo, signa drive, butah, and deeelay
walrus Audio Descent
#16
Bono from U2 uses Shure SM57, James from Metallica uses a Shure $400 broadcasting mic....yeah, you need to start with a U87 or maybe even a vintage U67

If you can afford them...by all means but I don't see a point unless you have a full high end signal chain, with Neve pres, Pultec compression and so forth...

You can achieve very believable results with something like an AT2020, don't let people tell you otherwise. I've recorded quite a few singers and the main part of a singer's sound IS the singer.

I think the biggest tell on budget recordings is the drums. You just can't fake a bad acoustic environment, cheap drums and cheap mics.

The audio interface is fine - you can probably wire 8 mics direct and then use your mixers inserts to power the inputs if you need more phantom power for mics.

Can't comment on mic choices as I am mostly unfamiliar with these brands.
Last edited by diabolical at Feb 26, 2014,
#17
I want to make the best recording I can within my budget. On know there is a lot of things gear won't do and I'm willing to put in the time to learn techniques to get the sounds I hear in my head. The drums are when most of time will go sound wise, I already assumed that with all the mics, mic placements, etc and it's going to take a lot of experimenting, but I want to know I have some pretty good tools I'm working with first. Not sure what your first comment is aimed at but sounds like this: unless you play stadiums daily and have multiple albums out you should just play a squire.

Like I said, I want to create the album that me and my friend have spent time on. This is a step to get there and I'm not recording it into behringer interface going into audacity. I'm also not throwing 30000 into a studio fully furnished. Really most of those mics will get plenty of use outside of the studio as I gig frequently. Having a good set of drum mics is a plus because I've played a lot of venues that had some first act mics they tried to get us to use so having a set of my own is a plus. Other than the interface and headphones, just about everything listed will be used weekly at gigs most likely.

And no one said I should buy a U87, Cath merely mentioned the prospect of renting something for a short amount of time you wouldn't be able to afford to get a better recording. The same concept could be used from your post: I could rent some studio time and have my buddy lay down all the drum tracks. I mean its an option if I can't get the results I want with that equipment but I believe with some acoustic treatment to the room and some hours messing with mic placement and learning the equipment Ill get good results with this stuff.

Anyway just not really sure what you were getting at in your post but this is pretty much where I'm at and my reasons if it even matters.
Ibanez SIR27
Pod HD500x

RIP:
Mesa Boogie Roadster 2x12 combo
Cmatmods analog chorus, phaser, tremoglo, signa drive, butah, and deeelay
walrus Audio Descent
#18
Honestly, your audio interface won't be much above a Behringer, divide the price by the channels and you'd see what I mean. What I am saying is that at this point u87 won't make much sense and a mic is an individual thing - just showing that two multimillion selling artists don't use it cause it doesn't work for them.
So when you spend that dough I guess it makes sense to try the competition in that price range.
#19
So you're saying the focusrite isn't going to be better than a behringer. Sorry not getting your point. And like I said, I have no intention of buying a u87, just want some good stuff. As far as trying stuff out, of course I'm not going to be buying blindly except for the interface that I really don't have a way of trying out.
Ibanez SIR27
Pod HD500x

RIP:
Mesa Boogie Roadster 2x12 combo
Cmatmods analog chorus, phaser, tremoglo, signa drive, butah, and deeelay
walrus Audio Descent
#20
Quote by bluestratplayer
Here is the list so far:
Focusrite 18i20 500
Audio Technica ATH-M50s 170
GLS ES57 (4) 140
CAD TSM411 (3) part of premium 4 pack 150
Shure Beta 52A 190
Heil PR30 275
Samson CO2 (2) for overheads used 100

$1525 total

Anything else I should consider outside of some extra mic stands and cables.

edit forgot the heil pr

Looks okay to me, though if I were you, I'd just get one ES57 and skip the Beta 52A until you try the PR30 as a kick mic. That'll save you $300 right there, which you can put towards some decent monitors, instead.

Also, buy those ATH-M50s on eBay, there's a retailer that will take best offers last I saw, I bought a pair from them for $115 a few years back and I bought a pair around Christmas from BuyDig on blow-out for $80, so there's deals to be had.

Also, look for the Focusrite used... If you're on a desktop, you can get a FireWire card (with TI drivers) and buy a Saffire Pro 40 for ~$300ish, which is the same thing as the 18i20, just it uses FW (which is a more proven protocol for high track counts at low latency than USB is).

You could probably find the PR30 for like half that used. Don't be afraid to buy used mics, unless they're Shure SM57s... there's so many fake ones out there, I wouldn't bother buying new unless I could inspect it for the telltale signs.

Quote by Cathbard
I've found that the key to taking the amateurish edge of a recording is all about the vocals and the vocals are all about the mic. Play with it in post production all you like, the key factor is the mic. Now who can afford a good condensor mic? **** nobody is who. Hire one. Get everything ready to lay down the vocals so you can do them in one day and hire something really good like Neumann for a day.
Everything else can be done on the cheap but not the vocals. Hiring is the trick for the financially challenged. This is of course for stuff you intend to be used for serious recordings that you are hoping to sell and such, not youtube guff.
I spent years trying to dress up vocals recorded on an SM58 and they were never right. Then one day somebody brought a Neumann U87 into the studio and it was instant "So that was the missing ingredient - a proper vocals condensor microphone. It seems so obvious now."

It really depends what kind of music you're recording, honestly.

If it's metal, with a screaming vocalist, there's plenty of great dynamic mics out there for good prices. Hell, MANY people actually prefer the SM7b over the U87 on most vocalists, and it only cost ~$400...

I'd argue that the drum sound is far more important than anything else in a mix, assuming everyone is talented and can play/sing their parts on correctly and in-time. You're never going to get a great drum sound in a small room with horrible acoustics. This is why most producers who don't have dedicated studios opt for programmed drums, instead.

FWIW, I did a shoot out of both my Stellar mics against the U87 and several other mics in the $2-3k range, and actually ended up picking one of the Stellars at least 70% of the time. That's pretty damn good for a mic that costs $415-500 new. Renting a high end mic is silly in the first place, unless you have an acoustically treated room that's going to get the best out of it.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#21
Oh yeah I am definitely going to buy used on anything I can. I googled for a while before choosing the 18i20 trying to find a way to use firewire and only got some bs adapters that people said didn't work. I would much prefer firewire or usb 3.0 but don't think anyone has much for 3.0 yet. Well I would at least be getting 2 or 3 of the es57's for my live needs, the prices I listed were worst case buying everything new type scenario. I'm sure my end cost will be much lower.

Any possibility of a link to the firewire thing. Do you have to open up the computer to put it in or something?


Oh as far as music goes sound wise think dream theater, porcupine tree, clean opeth, mastodon, and tool type stuff. Vocal wise there will be three different singers on the project and it will all be clean vocals.
Ibanez SIR27
Pod HD500x

RIP:
Mesa Boogie Roadster 2x12 combo
Cmatmods analog chorus, phaser, tremoglo, signa drive, butah, and deeelay
walrus Audio Descent
Last edited by bluestratplayer at Feb 27, 2014,
#22
There are firewire cards that can be installed and even a few new laptops that can be expanded for fw. If you need I can send links since I recently looked up laptops for friend.
There are PCI and PCIe fw cards that can be added to desktops.
#23
Ah ok, I'm not techy at all when it comes to computers. I know what you guys are talking about now. Last week when I was doing my research before posting this thread I was looking for pretty much a card reader or usb port type device that would go from firewire to usb and all I found was that it couldn't be done or didn't work, so I gave up. Guess I should have posted here a bit sooner.


ok just googled when you put and found them, wish I'd known what to look for before lol. Only question is, those all look different how do I know if a certain one will work in my computer or should I just go to staples or something and have them order one.
Ibanez SIR27
Pod HD500x

RIP:
Mesa Boogie Roadster 2x12 combo
Cmatmods analog chorus, phaser, tremoglo, signa drive, butah, and deeelay
walrus Audio Descent
#24
^You need to open up your computer and look at what ports on the motherboard are available (assuming you have a desktop). Look for something that looks like this (linked it rather than posting the image (it's huge), it's the best one on Google Images as far as visibility is concerned...):

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/0/0c/PCI_und_PCIe_Slots.jpg

Depending on what kind of slots you have will determine which kind of card you need to buy. PCI is the oldest technology and has the least amount of bandwidth... but still plenty enough for what you need.

You'll then want to buy a card that fits in there that has a Texas Instruments chipset. Generally, SIIG and Syba are good brands to buy from and they'll only cost you $30-40. For example:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16800998059 or
http://www.amazon.com/Syba-Profile-PCI-Express-Chipset-SD-PEX30009/dp/B002S53IG8

I've never seen an interface that utilizes FireWire 800, so rather than having to buy an adapter to plug your FW400 device into it, just go for the cheaper FW400 card.
Quote by Dave_Mc
I've had tube amps for a while now, but never actually had any go down on me
Quote by jj1565
maybe you're not saying the right things? an amp likes to know you care.





www.SanctityStudios.com
#25
Ok yeah this will be over my head. Ill get my brother in law to do it, he has built a couple computers and he owes me since I fixed up his valveking, put new pups in two of his guitars redoing all the wiring, and did a slight mod to a TS for him so yeah I'll have him do this . Thanks for everyone that have posted, I think I'm set to start price hunting after I find a computer. Been needing a new one for a while anyway and its just not going to cut it. I found a couple desktops around the specs you guys listed for pretty cheap.

Matrix and diabolical: I really appreciate all the help.
Ibanez SIR27
Pod HD500x

RIP:
Mesa Boogie Roadster 2x12 combo
Cmatmods analog chorus, phaser, tremoglo, signa drive, butah, and deeelay
walrus Audio Descent
#26
I would assume that you'd throw together a vocals booth, they aren't exactly a hard thing to build. I thought that would be telling you how to suck eggs. Isn't building a booth just common sense?
And if that has been done, the difference between an average vocals mic and a good one far outweighs the difference between an average interface and a good one.
I didn't saY that you need a U87 specifically but a good condensor mic is worth its weight in yak fat. Shit in, shit out. Hunt around and see what you can hire for what. Or you could root around for years trying to get a good vocals sound out of an SM58 - and then hire a good mic and bruise your forehead with your palm. You're bound to find something you can afford and see for yourself. Like I said, I found the difference between a good condensor and a good dynamic to be phenomenal. Night and day. I wasted a lot of time and money trying to extract a good vocals tone from things like SM58B and it was all for naught. The answer was, "toss away the mic and use a proper one."
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#27
In my opinion the bass is really the foundation of how heavy your guitar tone is. Should give a deep throaty reinforcement to the guitars while bringing the drums in. I took this tip from some Steven Slate advice and turned it metal.
http://taylorveraldi.wordpress.com/
#28
@Bluesstratplayer - you can also look up PCI or PCIe firewire at Guitar Center since theirs are guaranteed to work, or can order from Sweetwater via their techs, so that way you'll get the right thing. It is about $10 extra but you're guaranteed a TI fw card.