#4
He was to Spanish guitar music what Hendrix was to the electric guitar

I'm very, very greatful to my mother for exposing me to his music. It was a constant reminder of the fact that there's more types of music and playing styles than I can possibly fathom

Thanks for sharing this sad news, I wouldn't have wanted to find out about it on my smartphone while taking a dump (which for some reason just keeps happening lately, TF...)

/] 三方 [\
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#5
This is a HUGE loss
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MILF Tease
#6
One more gone to play at the great gig in the sky. R.I.P.
Squier "VMC" Stratocaster
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#8
Quote by JackWhiteIsButts
Ha ha, I finally know who one of these dead people is!


Wonder what made him kick the can so young.

Rumoured to be a heart attack

There's one thing I can't fulfill on the bucket list now.

A loss in the music world hasn't honestly hit anywhere near hard like this has.
#11
rest in peace. he was definetly one of a kind musician. I never had chance to watch him live because I was sick last year when he visisted Turkey. My father watched him. He is big fan of him. He told me that he was amazing, he was shining at stage. Not a superstar shine but elegant and noble one.

I wish if I had the chance to see him. Rest in piece, definetly a legend for music. Thanks to him for his contribution.
#12
Quote by WhiskeyFace

It's not about who's "better" -> de Lucía was incredibly infleuntial and he did something for this beautiful brand of music no one had ever managed to do before: he made it universal. For instance, the man introduced many instruments to the genre (listen to Entre Dos Aguas: the use of bongos was unheard of at the time, let alone the electric bass). It's hard to imagine modern flamenco without the Peruvian cajón, which he introduced as well

This guy played with some of the greats, introduced elements of jazz into the mix, ventured into the world of classical guitar and kicked major ass while at it. Check out his concierto de Aranjuez and keep in mind that when the guy was asked to perform this epic piece of music he was well into his 40s and had never attempted anything like it. In fact, he'd never had a classical education and could barely read sheet music, and yet the composer of that piece (Joaquin Rodrigo, who was still alive at the time) was completely blown away by this particular rendition

And yeah, you're right: even though he was an amazing virtuoso everyone who's familiar with the genre will tell you there's certainly more technical players out there, as well as people who'll typically adhere to a more traditional appproach (like in the Jerez-scene). But de Lucía's playing was elegant, unique and certainly not excessively technical, which is a big part of why his music caught on outside of Spain. Had he gone for the Gypsy Kings approach he could've made it even bigger, and if that had been the case you would've been right to question his relevance or whatever (although going "I think this guy's better" really isn't the best way to respond to this kind of news. You should feel bad WhiskeyFace)

/] 三方 [\
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#13
Quote by shwilly
It's not about who's "better" -> de Lucía was incredibly infleuntial and he did something for this beautiful brand of music no one had ever managed to do before: he made it universal. For instance, the man introduced many instruments to the genre (listen to Entre Dos Aguas: the use of bongos was unheard of at the time, let alone the electric bass). It's hard to imagine modern flamenco without the Peruvian cajón, which he introduced as well

This guy played with some of the greats, introduced elements of jazz into the mix, ventured into the world of classical guitar and kicked major ass while at it. Check out his concierto de Aranjuez and keep in mind that when the guy was asked to perform this epic piece of music he was well into his 40s and had never attempted anything like it. In fact, he'd never had a classical education and could barely read sheet music, and yet the composer of that piece (Joaquin Rodrigo, who was still alive at the time) was completely blown away by this particular rendition

And yeah, you're right: even though he was an amazing virtuoso everyone who's familiar with the genre will tell you there's certainly more technical players out there, as well as people who'll typically adhere to a more traditional appproach (like in the Jerez-scene). But de Lucía's playing was elegant, unique and certainly not excessively technical, which is a big part of why his music caught on outside of Spain. Had he gone for the Gypsy Kings approach he could've made it even bigger, and if that had been the case you would've been right to question his relevance or whatever (although going "I think this guy's better" really isn't the best way to respond to this kind of news. You should feel bad WhiskeyFace)

what he said
#14
Quote by shwilly
It's not about who's "better" -> de Lucía was incredibly infleuntial and he did something for this beautiful brand of music no one had ever managed to do before: he made it universal. For instance, the man introduced many instruments to the genre (listen to Entre Dos Aguas: the use of bongos was unheard of at the time, let alone the electric bass). It's hard to imagine modern flamenco without the Peruvian cajón, which he introduced as well

This guy played with some of the greats, introduced elements of jazz into the mix, ventured into the world of classical guitar and kicked major ass while at it. Check out his concierto de Aranjuez and keep in mind that when the guy was asked to perform this epic piece of music he was well into his 40s and had never attempted anything like it. In fact, he'd never had a classical education and could barely read sheet music, and yet the composer of that piece (Joaquin Rodrigo, who was still alive at the time) was completely blown away by this particular rendition

And yeah, you're right: even though he was an amazing virtuoso everyone who's familiar with the genre will tell you there's certainly more technical players out there, as well as people who'll typically adhere to a more traditional appproach (like in the Jerez-scene). But de Lucía's playing was elegant, unique and certainly not excessively technical, which is a big part of why his music caught on outside of Spain. Had he gone for the Gypsy Kings approach he could've made it even bigger, and if that had been the case you would've been right to question his relevance or whatever (although going "I think this guy's better" really isn't the best way to respond to this kind of news. You should feel bad WhiskeyFace)

#15
Say it ain't so.
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You should be careful what you say. Some asshole will probably sig it.

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Yup, a girl went up to me in my fursuit one time.

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#16
Quote by WhiskeyFace


Saw that episode yesterday
Quote by Ichikurosaki
sloth is hacking away feebly at the grass because he is a sloth but he was trying so hard ;_; hes all "penguin im HERE i am here to help you penguin"
#18
Aww man I have a friend who loves this guy and has told me about him more than once, I meant to start listening to him but for some silly reason never got really round to it.

That video is great, TS

RIP
Never imagine yourself not to be otherwise than what it might appear to others that what you were or might have been was not otherwise than what you had been would have appeared to them to be otherwise
#21
well ****..

I saw him live twice.. incredible experience!
My dad went to a show of his once, in a club that was apparently so crowded that he had to sit on the stage, next to the man himself .
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Oh dear, current affairs...
#22
Never been a fan of flamenco because I can't stand the singing style, but I like the guitars and this man was fantastic with them.
I have no sig
#23
I'd never heard of him before but I listened to all of the music ITT this morning and it was really great. Really disappointing that it took him dying to learn about him but hopefully the silver lining will be that this happens with more people and his talent gains some more deserved exposure. Sad that he died so young.
#25
lame
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On the come up we were listening to Grateful Dead and the music started passing through my bowel and out my arsehole as this violet stream of light. I shat music. It was beautiful.
#28
RIP guy I think Burg likes. Could be wrong tho, so don't judge me.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#33
R.I.P.

What a great musician he was
Quote by The Spoon
Unless you're sure she likes you, telling her you like her has a 110% chance of failing.

But hey, at least you have a 10% chance of absolutely guaranteeing failure.
#34
aw shit, guy is a legend
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do