#1
Actually I've written a song,it consists of the chords of A,D,G(All major) and latter on,it has got an E major chord.So,what I am thinking about how to make a solo on this key of D,do I have to learn all the shapes of the D major pentatonic scale all over the fretboard?I think then I would be able to make the solo,or do I have to do something else?Help me
#2
Quote by sumcty
Actually I've written a song,it consists of the chords of A,D,G(All major) and latter on,it has got an E major chord.So,what I am thinking about how to make a solo on this key of D,do I have to learn all the shapes of the D major pentatonic scale all over the fretboard?I think then I would be able to make the solo,or do I have to do something else?Help me


Approach it two ways, whichever you think fits the bill.

A Major A B C# D E F# G# A

Change the scale to play or omit the G# when over the G

D Major D E F# G A B C# D

Change the G to G# over the E

Best,

Sean
#3
Quote by sumcty
Actually I've written a song,it consists of the chords of A,D,G(All major) and latter on,it has got an E major chord.So,what I am thinking about how to make a solo on this key of D,do I have to learn all the shapes of the D major pentatonic scale all over the fretboard?I think then I would be able to make the solo,or do I have to do something else?Help me


The first question is "where does the song resolve?"

It probably resolves on D, but that's not a given (even before you add in the E Major chord).

So chances are the solo for this would be based on (although not exclusive to) either D major or D minor pentatonic. As Sean pointed out, you need to be aware of the G-naturals in your scale when you're over the E major chord (which has a G#) - but you can actually still play them (which is sometimes referred to as "false relations)"

That being said, merely knowing the scale isn't really enough to come up with a solo, because a solo usually involves a melody. So I would start by just playing the melody of the song as the solo, and then play with embellishing it.
#4
With those simple chords, I'm guessing it's kind of a rock song?

With a simple D major chord progression in a rock song, I would suggest soloing using the relative minor pentatonic scale -- B minor in this case. It is easier to learn, since the minor pentatonic has five rather than seven notes. B - D - E - F# - A - B. If you feel you need to add more notes, you'd probably first add the "blue" note -- F -- which will make this the "Blues" scale. And if you want to bend, you are safest bending the E in this scale.

If you want to add more, that does not seem enough, then the obvious options are the rest of the notes in the B minor scale (not the pentatonic, but the heptatonic? Seven notes?) which are the C# and the G.

To make this really "in the pocket" you can start/end on the B. Or you can make it a bit different if you make any of the other notes in the scale the "home" note, like even the E...If you keep coming back to the E and starting with it, and finding riffs that sound good that way over your progressions, your song will probably have a Dorian mode feel. And using the E will help that E major you throw in sound "right."

You can start soloing in B minor pentantonic, emphasizing the E or whatever you want, starting with the first minor pentatonic shape:

e------------------7-----------10
B------------(6)--7-----------10
G------------[6]--7-------9--(10)
D-----------------7-------9--------
A-----------------7--(8)--9--[10]
E-----------------7-------[9]--10

In the above, it is the first minor pentatonic shape, one of the easier shapes to remember. The notes in parenthesis are the "blue" notes that, if added, make this the Blues scale. The notes in brackets are the notes additional notes in the full relative minor scale (seven rather than five). Also, the above notes (excluding the ones in parenthesis) are the exact notes in the scale of D major.

I would play this and try to come back to the B a lot, see how that works, to get a nice rock feel, try adding in the F / blue note and see how that works, and bending the E. After you've experimented with that, maybe try it again trying to start with / end with / and treat as "home" the E (in which case you may not want to bend it, as that makes it less stable, but you could bend the F up to F#, or even bend the C# to D or F# to G in places since those are all in D major scale.

When you are playing the E major chord itself, you might want to avoid playing the G and D from the above notes, as those are not in the E major scale and could be clashy. But then again, they might very well work.

You have not mentioned the melody. If you have a melody that works over all of this, your solo should in some ways echo / reinforce / develop the melodic them from the vocal melody. That would be another starting point. Vocal melodies are fundamentally series of notes that can be turned into riffs in guitar solos.

Ken
Bernie Sanders for President!
#5
^^^ Playing the relative minor is not a thing dude. Your advice is basically "play the D major scale, call it B minor, use a b3 accidental and avoid clashing notes over the E". It sounds fine but has nothing to do with B minor. Changing the shape or position on the fretboard does not change the notes used or the resolution of the song.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#6
Your song could as well be in A major, using a I-IV-bVII chord progression. And if it's so, you could use A minor penatonic. If it's a rock song, it would fit it perfectly.

So,what I am thinking about how to make a solo on this key of D,do I have to learn all the shapes of the D major pentatonic scale all over the fretboard?I think then I would be able to make the solo,or do I have to do something else?

Yes, to be able to play the solo, it is good to know where to find the notes and learning the D major scale helps. But to be able to write a solo use your ears. Hear melodies in your head and try to find them on your fretboard. That way you aren't limited by just one scale.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#7
It looks like the thing might be in A, unless you're doing something really special with that D
#8
Quote by cdgraves
It looks like the thing might be in A, unless you're doing something really special with that D


It could also be in G.

You can't tell from the chords, without more context, so we shouldn't try to force him into other keys. If he tells us its in D, we should take his word for it, since nothing he's said is inconsistent with it being in D.

The II chord is very common in rock, and not just as a functioning secondary dominant (eg II-V-I).