#1
I am 21 and I love guitars as much or more than anyone. I was watching a video that Premier Guitar did at a local shop that I go to quite often. It made me think, I wonder if at some point in my lifetime the people will no longer play the guitar. This is probably a stupid question but while many people start their guitar journey each day, technology continues to advance. I just wonder if someday like regular amps and guitars will no longer be around. That is a life that I don't want to be in. lol
What do you think?
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#2
If Arcade Fire can get to the top of the charts using an accordian in their songs, then anything is possible.

Music comes in waves and popular listeners eat up to what media gives them. The trend now is electronica, J.S. Beiber and folk rock.
#3
I think it's getting so most new players just want to do shred licks etc, not very listenable so I see that aspect declining a lot in 15 years or so. Accompaniment is guitars main use, that will never die.
#5
Hopefully lead guitar will die (it pretty much is dead, hopefully it stays that way) but guitar in the rhythm section is too good of an instrument to die off. It can play a vast variety of chords easily while the performer stands and is able to sing at the same time. A mix of electronic (computer) and acoustic instruments is most likely going to be dominant in popular music for a few decades, as it has been.
#6
i don't know for sure. that's why i made it my business to be able to play more than one instrument at a professional level.

more capabilities, more work.
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#7
Nope, it's had a good 700 year run but it'll die out within your lifetime bud.

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#8
I kind of agree macashmack. I think lead guitar has become very repetitive, although it is still fun to play. Lately, I have been learning jazz rhythm guitar and those chord voicings are great and not that many people go that route. I am in a band and it gets kind of frustrating because my friend kind of just wants to regurgitate Killswitch Engage songs and make them our material. Although I like metalcore it is getting to the point where every band is the same.
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#9
I think it'll be here for a long while.

I like to think of it this way: Guitars have been around for a long-long time already. About 800-ish years if you want to count the Spanish.

Electric guitar was invented in the 30s and really took the instrument in an entirely new direction. So although guitar is super old, it's been given some new life. Much like synths did for keys.

Of course stuff like screaming 20-minute solos seem to be falling by the wayside, but rock (in the broadest sense of the term) is still a very major part of popular music.

Who knows where music will go in the next 20, 30, 60 years, but I don't see the guitar disappearing. Not if it made it through the 80s And who knows? maybe screaming solos will come back in style.

The great thing about music nowadays is you really can go out and do (and release) anything (even if jazz harpsicord is your thing) as long as you don't harbor delusions of becoming a 'rock star'. Just do everyone a favor and get good at your instrument first
#10
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#11
why hate on the lead guitar?

oh prolly just one of those peeps that cant play that kinda guitar =D
Ultimately, it's all an Illusion for your confusion.

#12
People who tend to think lead guitars are obsolete would generally rather listen to New Wave Industrial Trap House Wub Step, and I'm not really convinced that that will be the 'death' of guitar based music. The guitar will be around for as long as people appreciate the instrument, and what type of forum are we on?
#14
Music peaked in the 70's in my opinion. As far as quality. That said, live long enough, and you find everything is cyclical in music. That's how come analog still is desired in a digital world, People miss records and old albums still have a place, and so forth.

So, I don't think it will die, but "styles" will fragment out and bastardize and you will find it moved into narrow niches in terms of popularity.


There's already evidence that has happened with Jazz.

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Sean
#15
I think guitars will remain, even top 40 music has some sort of guitar in them as insignificant as that "genre" has made them. I think.

But top 40 has proven that talent is nothing, image is everything.

With rock's decline, I have been more apt to follow country's "harder edge" acts that actually utilize the guitar very well. And there is this whole underbelly of "blue's rock" that just seems like it is waiting to explode.

Just my opinion.
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#16
How many of these threads do people post?

But yeah, the answer is no. Even if guitar is going to be replaced by some random electronic instruments in mainstream music (and I think it already pretty much has been), it doesn't mean people won't be interested in playing the guitar. As long as people listen to music with guitars, people will be interested in playing the guitar. And since when has mainstream music been the only music people listen to? I mostly listen to 60s-80s music and I wasn't even born back then.

Also, guitar is one of the most popular instruments. Why? Because it's fairly easy to learn to play (of course becoming good at guitar is a different story), it's pretty handy (it's light, you can take it everywhere), it can play chords (so you can sing and play campfire songs) and melody.

Instruments like trumpet are rarely used in popular music but people still play them. Guitar is a lot more "handy" than trumpet so I would expect it to remain popular a bit longer than trumpet. But there are still lots of trumpeters (including me).

Guitar is a bit like piano. It's pretty logical (and that's what makes it easy to learn to play) and can play both melody and chords. It's a good instrument to work with.

Also, not every guitarist wants to become the next big thing. It's not all about the money and fame. Playing the guitar is fun. And even if it's not going to be used in contemporary music, people will still want to play instruments for fun.
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#17
Biased.

We are musicians, we view music from perspective as that.

For my gf, or my parents, or my neighbours, shred guitar didn't become more popular or less popular or equal, they don't even think or care about that stuff.

People should stop viewing the world as if every listener of music is a guitarist or musician

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Feb 28, 2014,
#19
Quote by COREYTAYLOR721
I am 21 and I love guitars as much or more than anyone. I was watching a video that Premier Guitar did at a local shop that I go to quite often. It made me think, I wonder if at some point in my lifetime the people will no longer play the guitar. This is probably a stupid question but while many people start their guitar journey each day, technology continues to advance. I just wonder if someday like regular amps and guitars will no longer be around. That is a life that I don't want to be in. lol
What do you think?


I think there will probably always be people that play guitar, but it's definitely had it's day, and the peak was decades ago. I don't believe it will ever be like that again. I do fear that regular guitars and amps will lose out to technology and pop culture. I wouldn't worry about it though, as there isn't a thing you could do about it other than play your guitar and enjoy the heck out of it.
#20
Yes, instruments have historically faded in and out of popularity and the guitar is not immune to those trends. I do not believe, however, that I will live to see the day that the guitar is completely old fashioned.
#22
Quote by sweetdude3000
If Arcade Fire can get to the top of the charts using an accordian in their songs, then anything is possible.


Fixed?

Quote by MaggaraMarine
How many of these threads do people post?

But yeah, the answer is no. Even if guitar is going to be replaced by some random electronic instruments in mainstream music (and I think it already pretty much has been), it doesn't mean people won't be interested in playing the guitar. As long as people listen to music with guitars, people will be interested in playing the guitar. And since when has mainstream music been the only music people listen to? I mostly listen to 60s-80s music and I wasn't even born back then.

Also, guitar is one of the most popular instruments. Why? Because it's fairly easy to learn to play (of course becoming good at guitar is a different story), it's pretty handy (it's light, you can take it everywhere), it can play chords (so you can sing and play campfire songs) and melody.

Instruments like trumpet are rarely used in popular music but people still play them. Guitar is a lot more "handy" than trumpet so I would expect it to remain popular a bit longer than trumpet. But there are still lots of trumpeters (including me).

Guitar is a bit like piano. It's pretty logical (and that's what makes it easy to learn to play) and can play both melody and chords. It's a good instrument to work with.

Also, not every guitarist wants to become the next big thing. It's not all about the money and fame. Playing the guitar is fun. And even if it's not going to be used in contemporary music, people will still want to play instruments for fun.


Agreed.

Or at least, it may well die out eventually. No-one knows what's going to happen far into the future. In the near future, probably not (but again, you never know).

Also lead guitar is awesome
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#23
Quote by Tempoe
I think it's getting so most new players just want to do shred licks etc, not very listenable so I see that aspect declining a lot in 15 years or so. Accompaniment is guitars main use, that will never die.

You must have a very skewed view of why new players pick up guitar. As cheesy as it might sound, I originally picked up guitar because I liked early Linkin Park and P.O.D. I wanted to learn how to write songs like them. As time went on, my tastes obviously changed. But my point is, not all players pick up the guitar because they want to be the next Malmsteen. A new player's favorite band(s) is more likely influence on their desire to play.
#24
People like fresh new exciting sounds with bands/singers that are "fun", danceable or they can relate to. Classical is passed off because it requires active thinking (read: work), it's not danceable, too many notes, no singer, introverted, esoteric. It's like going to see a Shakespeare play rather than the new Marvel movie. Public at large gets bored easily - breadth, not depth. Everyone wants novelty, but you can do that by listening to a new genre instead of savoring musical depth.

For top 40, best to be strong in timbre, rhythm and an upbeat tempo (dance music, the Voice). Image is important too. Topics that are not serious, funny, relatable, simple (like love or breaking up or what foxes say.) When guitar was new and exciting, people loved that. To the uninitiated, the guitar has only two sounds, distortion or clean. Now, it's all in the past. You will still have your niche genre guitar guys like Laiho or Friedman, but probably no Townshends or Brian Mays or Hendrixes for quite a long time.
#25
We still have musicians who play piano, violin, cello, double bass, and woodwinds on a regular basis. These instruments have been around for a few hundred years while the modern guitar has been here for like 150 years, so it's not going anywhere.
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#26
Imo, I think of it like this. Before the 90's it was almost impossible to buy Organic foods, unless you knew farmers. Nowadays, you can walk into any store and find an organic section. Things come and go. Right now electronic music is the happenin' happenin'! but eventually I believe there will be a generation that brings back organic music; like every thing else.
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#27
Quote by macashmack
Good rhythm guitar is harder to play and more interesting than lead guitar.

Agreed.

And like someone earlier mentioned in the thread, I think it's just lead guitar and long solos, etc. that will "die". Rhythm/comping guitar isn't gonna go anywhere. Rock and guitar solos are dying, but not the instrument itself.
Last edited by Elintasokas at Feb 28, 2014,
#28
Quote by Elintasokas
Agreed.

And like someone earlier mentioned in the thread, I think it's just lead guitar and long solos, etc. that will "die". Rhythm/comping guitar isn't gonna go anywhere. Rock and guitar solos are dying, but not the instrument itself.


Yeah people said that in the early 90s. And then they came back. Music goes in cycles, everything old becomes new again.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#29
Quote by AlanHB
Yeah people said that in the early 90s. And then they came back. Music goes in cycles, everything old becomes new again.


Agreed. Things come and go like the tides. I looked at pics of my dad in the 50 s with a comb over and laughed. Now they are all over again!
#30
Quote by GuitarMunky
I think there will probably always be people that play guitar, but it's definitely had it's day, and the peak was decades ago. I don't believe it will ever be like that again. I do fear that regular guitars and amps will lose out to technology and pop culture. I wouldn't worry about it though, as there isn't a thing you could do about it other than play your guitar and enjoy the heck out of it.

Yeah, guitars in mainstream music aren't that important any more but regular electric guitars are used so much in other kind of music (people still play a lot of rock, metal and jazz music). Distorted electric guitar is the main part of the "rock sound". If rock dies, people may stop playing the guitar. It's so important part of rock music that I don't think it will lose its popularity (and I don't think it will be replaced by digital modelings of electric guitar because music isn't all about listening - it's also about playing, and I think music will lose something if nobody plays it any more). And I'm only talking about electric guitar.

As I said in my previous post, guitar is a portable instrument. It's lighter and easier to carry with than piano but it can pretty much do the same things as a piano. So if you want to sing some campfire songs (and I'm pretty sure people will always like to sing and play music), guitar is the best instrument for that. Also, people today listen to classical music and there are lots of classical guitar pieces. They may be hundreds of years old but so are most of the classical pieces people listen to. I don't think it matters how old the music is. Music is timeless (OK, mainstream music may not be but that's not its point). Even though rock may have seen its better days, people still listen to the old classics.
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#31
The guitar is interesting. It built up significant popular appeal as a lead instrument from the 60s onward, climaxing in the sherd days of the 80s. Then it sort of retreated into the background since then.

When I first started playing guitar, I was really into the lead aspects of the guitar. But I've slowly been coming around to the rhythm side of things. Part of it is because I feel like key aspects of the guitar like it's ease of chord work and being able to play multiple notes simultaneously are lost by those playing with "lead" on the brain.
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#32
In early 1962 Decca rejected the Beatles on the grounds that guitar groups were on the way out. (Considered by many as one of the biggest mistakes in music history.)

The guitar is a beautiful instrument capable of captivating an audience on it's own or when providing accompaniment for a singer or as part of a larger group.

It is easy to learn and difficult to master which means it can provide both satisfaction and a challenge to all levels of musicians.

It is portable and can be taken anywhere.

So the answer is no. The guitar is not going to become unpopular anytime soon. The human voice aside, the guitar and piano are the most popular instruments in the world. Even with the advent of new technology the guitar and piano will remain the most popular instruments.

The guitar solo might be disappearing and other instruments may dominate some new "trendy" genres but there is plenty of guitar music around.

On the point of the guitar solo losing prominence...is it really such a great thing? What has it been replaced by? Ever notice there is a lot of rap now in a lot of popular music. Where there used to be a guitar solo as an instrumental break you will notice that in most popular music now there is no guitar solo and the function that solo served in the past is now served by a rap interlude.

Oh yay!!! Now instead of Jimi Page playing a solo on a string of hits we get a Pit Bull rap. I say bring back the guitar solo. Urgently!!
Si
#33
^ Though a guitar solo in a basic mainstream pop song would also sound terrible. It just wouldn't fit the song at all and would sound forced and cheesy. So I don't think rap solos have replaced guitar solos. They are different genres of music. I haven't really heard rap solos in rock music. And you don't really hear guitar solos in pop music either (other than songs like Beat It but it was more of a pop rock song).

It is true that guitar solos aren't that important in rock music any more. I think they haven't been replaced by anything. There just isn't as many solos any more. Today people don't care that much who the guitarists in a band are and who plays what part. In the 80s everybody knew the guitarist and the singer of the band.

Guitar solos are good if they make the song sound better. But IMO not every song needs a guitar solo. Sometimes it just sounds too forced and sometimes it adds nothing to the song.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Mar 1, 2014,
#34
Quote by AlanHB
Yeah people said that in the early 90s. And then they came back. Music goes in cycles, everything old becomes new again.


+1

There aren't as many solos as there were in the 80s, or maybe even the late 60s and 70s, but there are an awful lot more than there were round the turn of the millennium, where they were all but forbidden...

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Quote by 20Tigers

On the point of the guitar solo losing prominence...is it really such a great thing? What has it been replaced by?


That's a good point. In a lot of rock-type songs without solos, they have a bridge or something like that which basically just sounds to me like, "right, normally we'd put a solo there but they aren't cool any more so we can't. Any ideas what we can put there?"

I'm not saying every song has to have a solo, or that I only like songs with solos in them or anything like that (plus I'd rather listen to no solo than a bad one), but holy crap, if you can't think what to put there instead, putting something which is basically a tacit admission that you have no idea what to do if you don't put a solo is arguably even worse, if you ask me.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#35
Quote by MaggaraMarine
^ Though a guitar solo in a basic mainstream pop song would also sound terrible. It just wouldn't fit the song at all and would sound forced and cheesy. So I don't think rap solos have replaced guitar solos. They are different genres of music. I haven't really heard rap solos in rock music. And you don't really hear guitar solos in pop music either (other than songs like Beat It but it was more of a pop rock song).

It is true that guitar solos aren't that important in rock music any more. I think they haven't been replaced by anything. There just isn't as many solos any more. Today people don't care that much who the guitarists in a band are and who plays what part. In the 80s everybody knew the guitarist and the singer of the band.

Guitar solos are good if they make the song sound better. But IMO not every song needs a guitar solo. Sometimes it just sounds too forced and sometimes it adds nothing to the song.

I didn't really mean it literally. It was more an observation that musical styles have changed and it wasn't just the guitar solo but a "musical interlude" in general whether it be guitar piano xylophone or whatever that used to feature commonly in popular music (billboard top 20 kind of music). Times and the musical landscape has changed and now instead of a musical interlude such as a short guitar or piano solo you are more likely to hear a "rap" featuring in the song to serve the same structural function that the guitar solo did 30 years ago.

It's not a direct replacement, it is, as you noted, more a reflection on changing styles of music.
Si
#36
Guitar will always be here; it's been around for hundreds of years. However, I think the guitar's prime is long gone.
#37
Goonies never die.
Guitarists never die.


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#38
Do you think the guitar will remain popular?

No, the guitar will disappear. After WW3, in the, "new dark ages", that follow, it will reemerge as the lute. Post apocalyptic minstrels will appear, recanting "the horror, the horror", of nuclear war. Disembowelment, famine, ruin, radiation sickness, and genetic mutation, will provide a "fertile cemetery", for the ensuing litany of depressing poetry, played totally against the newly rediscovered Dorian mode.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 6, 2014,
#39
Quote by crazysam23_Atax
You must have a very skewed view of why new players pick up guitar. As cheesy as it might sound, I originally picked up guitar because I liked early Linkin Park and P.O.D. I wanted to learn how to write songs like them. As time went on, my tastes obviously changed. But my point is, not all players pick up the guitar because they want to be the next Malmsteen. A new player's favorite band(s) is more likely influence on their desire to play.



This is a great point.

Picking up guitar is not a very hard thing to do, except for a small financial fee.

My interest and love for music has greatly increased after I started guitar, and picking up guitar was literally a class assignment I had (wanted to do drums initially).

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