#1
I was thinking about buying a Splawn quick rod with el34s. I've heard that they do not sound great when the volume's low. I want to be able to use this live and in my basement and not disturb my family. Is this quick rod at low volumes fact or fiction?

Thx in advance
#2
I don't know about splawn, but all other tube amps i have played with do not sound very good at low volumes, muddy and not punchy sound.
#3
Quote by Redman113
I was thinking about buying a Splawn quick rod with el34s. I've heard that they do not sound great when the volume's low. I want to be able to use this live and in my basement and not disturb my family. Is this quick rod at low volumes fact or fiction?

Thx in advance

They sound decent at practice volume, better when played loud.

Also:
Guitar Center Portland
South Portland, Maine 04106
207-822-9822
SPLAWN QUICKROD 100W TUBE HEAD
$999.99
#4
Pretty much any tube amp isn't going to sound its best until its cranked up. But you should still be able get a decent sound without having to make anyone go deaf.
#5
Quick Rod's don't sound terrible at low volume by any means, they just sound considerably better at high volume like any proper amp.
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#6
And at the end of the day wtf does it matter? Why do you need epic tone when practicing quietly? That comes pretty close to the definition of self indulgence.
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#7
Quote by Cathbard
And at the end of the day wtf does it matter? Why do you need epic tone when practicing quietly? That comes pretty close to the definition of self indulgence.

Really Cath? Most of our tone chasing is self-indulgence, and audience wouldn't care. It's part of being a gear nut


TS: The QR still sounds very nice at low volume. I would actually say it stays nicer at low volumes than most amps.
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#8
Quote by Cathbard
And at the end of the day wtf does it matter? Why do you need epic tone when practicing quietly? That comes pretty close to the definition of self indulgence.



Yep.

Which is why I'm gonna buy a Kemper.

Your point?
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#9
I don't need mood lighting while tugging it, and I don't need epic tone while practicing
#10
Knew that would create some responses.

The audience do notice. Maybe not all of them, but I get plenty of people complimenting me on my tone. And when for some reason I have had to take a backwards step (ie using a backup amp or somebody else's) people comment on that too. "Something was off with your sound tonight." sorta thing.
If you don't get that sort of feedback from the punters, maybe they aren't paying attention to you? Maybe you need to practice more so you do get their attention? You don't even have to plug the damn guitar in to do that.
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#11
Dammit you dusty old fart, I think you just try to create arguments sometimes

Ya they'll notice if you have good tone, point is you could get away gigging with a cheap SS head if you wanted. Sure they'll notice a good tone, but it's not really going to make a huge difference to them, not nearly as much as your playing. Tone chasing is more to satisfy the guitarist than anything, so it's (fairly) irrelevant if anyone else is listening.
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#12
Hear two bands back to back and it's obvious. I've had people say, "As soon you guys hit the first note it was obvious you were the pros on the bill."
Don't tell me it makes no difference, because you're wrong. They do care, even if they don't know why, they know pro sound from amateur hour. Want to sound like a bunch of kids playing in the garage? Don't worry about tone.
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#13
Okay, I'll give you that, saying the audience wouldn't notice is a hasty, overkill statement.

My point is that chasing that "perfect tone" is to satisfy the guitarist. You can sound pro with a lot of different amps, but the guitarist is the one that isn't quite satisfied until they find that "it" amp that has the tone they have in their head. They're the ones that really care if they're playing a JCM 800 or a Quickrod. I feel that most people can tell between a good sound and a bad sound, but only the player (or other players I suppose) can tell the difference in a good sound and "that" sound. So, as a result, a lot of the tone chasing we do is really just self indulgence, as you put it.
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#14
I think it's far more akin to a tradesman and his tools. It's not self indulgence to arm yourself with the best tools, it's professionalism.
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#15
You don't need to know the physics behind a roller coaster to get the adrenaline rush, nor do you need to know the ingredients to a soup for it to taste good.

Audience might not be able to tell what is what, and know which frequencies sound good, but it most certainly can and will make a difference to their (emotional) experience.

That being said Cath, everything we do is self indulgence.

You going out on the stage is just the most amicable way. (Love for love). Give and take. Though if you would only get booed, I'm pretty sure you wouldn't perform.

..if you would perform however with only negative responses, then ironically the incentive would most likely be self indulgence, seeing how your opinion outweighs other's negative ones based on you still rocking out.

Nothing wrong with having a good sound at home, and even would go as far that a lot of people got inspired by their (good) sound during practice and/or recording.

When I played some riffs at home they were "okay", but playing them in rehearsal with saturation, depth and fading dynamic sustain, gave me the inflection to use it in a song, but only when heard through my performing rig.

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#16
My point being, the Splawn is a pro tool for the job, whether it also sounds as (or near as) good when practicing is immaterial really. It will make noise at the level you need so it's an adequate tool for practicing and surely, how it sounds on stage is what really matters. Not buying something like a Splawn, which is a serious gigging amp, based on how it may sound when practicing quietly at home is assinine.
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#17
Quote by Cathbard
My point being, the Splawn is a pro tool for the job, whether it also sounds as (or near as) good when practicing is immaterial really. It will make noise at the level you need so it's an adequate tool for practicing and surely, how it sounds on stage is what really matters. Not buying something like a Splawn, which is a serious gigging amp, based on how it may sound when practicing quietly at home is assinine.


True, and I agree.

Though the mysterious part of my brain can't stop to think that you most likely (perhaps subconsciously) know from experience that what you play through you practice amp scales well to a band situation and/or performance.

Like how some people can write on sheet a melody and when performed works great, while other's try that, and when played back is nothing like how they imagined it would come out.

That however remains a mystery.

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Last edited by xxdarrenxx at Mar 1, 2014,
#18
I'm an old hand. I just joined an originals band and did my first gig with them after hearing the songs two days earlier. I'm a self taught street musician. Throw me into a band and I'll be playing the music in minutes. Sheet music, I'm useless. I have to feel it, not read it.
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#19
So where are these gigs you're playing that the audience is so picky about your tone? Are you playing a guitar clinic?

I used to get complements when I gigged with my Marshall MG, but I'm sure none of you will believe that. The audience doesn't give a damn what gear you have, as long as you play good. Just like I don't care if the guy fixing my house uses a Dewalt or Ryobi drill. They both yield the same results in the end.
#20
Quote by 757ian123
I used to get complements when I gigged with my Marshall MG, but I'm sure none of you will believe that. The audience doesn't give a damn what gear you have, as long as you play good. Just like I don't care if the guy fixing my house uses a Dewalt or Ryobi drill. They both yield the same results in the end.

I'm sure you did get compliments when playing your MG. Show up to the same gig, with the same audience, and play a JCM 800 the next week and see what they say.

I do care what tools someone uses in my home, and professionals know that. I used to sell construction equipment and I can tell you those guys care about perception of their tools. We sold a green laser level, as opposed to the red one, and I often heard that it was a status symbol for contractors; they want to be the guy with the fancy green laser to impress clients. It didn't really do anything the red didn't, but it was more expensive.
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#21
I'm sure that you do care, just like I'm sure there are certain people who care about the guitar player's amp.

But I'm talking about the general public. 95% of them simply don't know any better, and there is nothing wrong with that. I used to do construction and never had a customer ask me "so, what tools will you be using?"
#22
Quote by 757ian123
I'm sure that you do care, just like I'm sure there are certain people who care about the guitar player's amp.

But I'm talking about the general public. 95% of them simply don't know any better, and there is nothing wrong with that. I used to do construction and never had a customer ask me "so, what tools will you be using?"

You're missing my point. The customer doesn't actually care about the tools, he just uses them as a benchmark to get an idea of the worker. No one asked you about your tools, but they noticed. I worked for Hilti. If you worked in construction you know the name, and you know that all the big boy contractors use them. There's a prestige to them. We're pushing the limits of this analogy, though.

In the case of music they don't even have to look, they can hear the difference. Maybe they don't know what they're hearing, but they're still making assumptions about it. I've heard great bands sound terrible due to equipment and vice versa. I know enough to pick up on that, but for the general public they just think the band was good or bad.

Think of recording equipment. Does the average listener know a single thing about recording equipment or practices? Probably not. Would they know a shitty recording from a good one? Absolutely. Would they prefer to listen to the good one? Absolutely.
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Unless its electronic drums.

BURN THE WITCH!!!!!
#23
Quote by 757ian123
I'm sure that you do care, just like I'm sure there are certain people who care about the guitar player's amp.

But I'm talking about the general public. 95% of them simply don't know any better, and there is nothing wrong with that. I used to do construction and never had a customer ask me "so, what tools will you be using?"


I get your point, and we can't forget that how well a band plays together matters most in terms of how a crowd will responsd.

However I don't think your analogy between carpentry and live music are perfect. They are very different circumstances and just because the crowd doesn't consist entirely of musicians doesn't mean they don't appreciate better clarity and voicing. I've had people watch my shows multiple times over the years and during that time my rig has improved and so have the venues. They definitely notice these types of things. Now is it subjective to a certain extent? Yea, but a DSL is straight up a better live amp than a MG, or Spider.
#24
Quote by 757ian123
So where are these gigs you're playing that the audience is so picky about your tone? Are you playing a guitar clinic?

I used to get complements when I gigged with my Marshall MG, but I'm sure none of you will believe that. The audience doesn't give a damn what gear you have, as long as you play good. Just like I don't care if the guy fixing my house uses a Dewalt or Ryobi drill. They both yield the same results in the end.


Like someone else said- play first or second with your MG and then the other band uses a 5150... You will sound like shit in comparison, the audience will surely notice assuming musicianship levels are similar.
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#25
In my experience good tone is important to sounding good, sounding good impresses people. By yourself it's one thing, but gigging with a band, it is incredibly important that you have an amp that cuts and has good clarity. The audience may not understand out of context, but when you are with a band they will notice if they can't hear the guitar or if it muddy. That doesn't mean that given the right situation an MG or Frontman couldn't get the job done, but it is more likely to lead to a nasty, undefined sound, which translates to poor audience impressions.
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#26
I get what you guys are saying but in my experience it just doesn't happen. I can't believe that someone who's never touched a guitar will know the difference between a good amp and a cheap one. I guess we can agree to disagree on this one.
#27
Quote by 757ian123
So where are these gigs you're playing that the audience is so picky about your tone? Are you playing a guitar clinic?

I used to get complements when I gigged with my Marshall MG, but I'm sure none of you will believe that. The audience doesn't give a damn what gear you have, as long as you play good. Just like I don't care if the guy fixing my house uses a Dewalt or Ryobi drill. They both yield the same results in the end.
Pubs mainly. I get compliments on my playing regardless what equipment I use - that's not the point. They also know when my sound is off. They will usually follow it with, "you played well, you just didn't really sound like you tonight."
People may not know why things sound as they do but people going to see bands are used to listening to bands and will generally know good sound from bad sound even if they don't know the reason. Sounds to me like you don't have a very high opinion of your fans, that's a little concerning. We aren't talking about the general population here either, we are talking about fans of live music - and you don't think they know anything about how live music sounds? They don't know good from bad? You may want to take a look at yourself. People aren't as obtuse as you think. Some may be but is that what you are aiming at? The lowest common denominator? I have more respect for my fans than that.
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Cathbard Amplification
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#28
Your 4 fans must love you Cath.
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#29
Yeah, and their dog.
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Cathbard Amplification
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#30
Quote by Cathbard
Yeah, and their dog.


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