#1
OK so I'm trying to make a Demo and wondering things like, type of songs, how many songs, should I put a head shot & "resume" with it. I've played out before but never solo so I've never had to do this before. Thanks for your input.
#3
I'd say 2-4 songs are sufficient, put whatever ones you think are your best
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#4
Not how music works anymore, do some research etc. Sending your music off to some record label exec with any 'resume' etc. will just mean you've put money into something to decorate their bin with, if it even reaches their offices.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#6
Demo for who? Your target audience defines the product.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#7
I remember reading a tweet from the head of some label that was something like, 'If you're really sending a demo to our label in 2013, then you might as well make the packaging impossible to get off'
#8
Yeah, I should point out there are still reasons for having a 'press pack' or whatever you want to call it - it's just that sending off demos, with some random cover letter, to record labels is not going to get you anywhere. Sending out packs with all the info that journalists need, however, for them to cover you in an article and to make sure they remember your name, is a good idea... unfortunately I don't think that's what TS was on about, as that's not really considered a demo.
Hey, look. Sigs are back.
#10
Quote by willT08
Sending tunes to label heads still works for some music

Yup, that's how EDM works
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#11
Well I dunno about all EDM, but certainly for the darker sides of DnB and Dubstep. I've got the heads of all the big labels in my music on Facebook and can just shoot them tunes over whenever.
#13
Yeah it probably isn't the way Ultra and Spinnin do their things but like you said dubstep and dn'b do. And from my viewpoint I can tell you that tech-house is done the same way.
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#14
Quote by captainsnazz
justify labels to me will

I don't need to justify anything to you!

But for real, as good as putting tunes on Soundcloud is and you have control and you might get a few bookings and that - if I send tunes to a guy called Jeremy and he decides he wants to put one out I've then got a team of people working on getting my music heard, getting me bookings, giving me opportunities to make money doing things I want to do.

You can do them all by grafting like hell on your own, but why would you want to?
#15
I honestly can't see it being worth giving up some of your control for a little more exposure. Realistically the only people that follow what small labels are doing are other musicians which is a tiny audience you could access anyway. The only real benefits I can see are some practical things like spotify require you to be represented by a label or something, but you can get round that anyway. And maybe something about knowing who to ask for gigs but it's not really necessary and live music sucks anyway.
Labels are largely unnecessary now that nobody cares about physical copies of music, which was really the only thing that'd be difficult for you to do without one.

Maybe I'll test this when I've got some actual music ready.
#16
I thought Demos were what you gave to club owners to get shows, then you sold them at those shows? Maybe I'm doing it wrong.
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#17
Well we need to decide what scale label we're talking about. For example Chestplate just picked up a guy because Distance was sat in an airport bored and found a guy Mesck, on soundcloud. And next month they're doing a takeover at Fabric...

You don't have much chance of getting to play Fabric without releasing through some labels.

Also, you don't have to be signed to a label, which is what I think is giving you the idea of giving up control. Say I send 2 tunes to Jeremy, he wants to put them out, we sign a contract for those 2 tracks and that release and that's that. I can make whatever I like and just send out the ones I think will sell to label heads, you don't have to give up control musically at all. If you want complete control of every aesthetic choice that surrounds your music then fair enough, but I don't think many people want that, or benefit from it

EDIT: Also, my brother loved CD Is Dead but tries to tell me he doesn't like Grime lol
Last edited by willT08 at Feb 28, 2014,
#18
Labels are a quick way to get tons of connections too. Also there's the fact that quite a few labels are well respected and being on them will earn you that respect too. And cool labels do cool shit like throw parties and exclusive shows and send their artists on tour together.
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#20
My Bad guys I should have been more clear, I'm looking to give something to bar owners to get gigs. I realize my best stuff would be obvious and a couple of different tempo songs should be on there as well. But I'm not interested in labels at all. Sorry about that.