#1
Hello. I am trying to record some music for fun. I was going to try to record myself with a camcorder but people have kind of talked me out of it. I just want a track with (1) guitar, (2) basic drum track, (3) second guitar for the solo, and (4) vocals. Guitar (1) will be mostly clean. Guitar 2, which will be used only for solo, will be distorted. I will be doing the singing. I was hoping to download a drum track somewhere because I've never made one. Here's the equipment I have:

1. guitar
2. modern computer
3. Vox Tone Lab Amp (just the metal box with panoply of knobs--not connected to speaker)
4. Marshall MG 15W amp
5. Marshall MG 50W amp
6. Cheap JVC studio headphones

Several years ago, I recorded some into Home Studio 2. My basic steup was to run the Vox amp to a M-Audio interface and the interface to the computer. Although I was recording, I didn't have a lot of success; I found the software kind of hard to use. Also, I plugged the mic directly into the M-Audio and my vocals weren't being picked up. I went to their forums and no one could figure out what was wrong. I later stopped playing the guitar and sold the M-Audio interface.

With that background, please tell me what to get. I'd rather record straight into the computer rather than use a condenser mic because I don't want to disturb my neighbors. Also, I need a reliable way of recording vocals this time. Finally, I'd prefer to use free software if it's available and safe because I have very limited resources. I just want to make the most out of what I already have.

Thanks.
#2
Please read the interface sticky at the top of the forum
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#3
Quote by MatrixClaw
Please read the interface sticky at the top of the forum

I'll do that, but I think my question goes beyond that.
#4
Quote by selftaught1000
I'll do that, but I think my question goes beyond that.

No it doesn't.
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#5
Your questions are basically the same ones we get about 4 times a week. How can I DI guitar, How can I record vocals, What drum software is there.

Answer is the same as all the others, interface + condenser (for vocals) + drum machine software. The combination I would recommend (and use myself) is Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 + Behringer Condenser (C1 for super cheap, B1 for a little more, B2 Pro if possible) + Sennhieser DrumMicA. You could get that entire setup in under $300. If you really wanna go super cheap (sub-$100) then swap the interface for one of those Guitar Links off eBay, and get the C1-U which is USB. That would come out to ~$50-$80.

Also, if you're doing full covers I recommend getting a bass, or using a pitch effect to bring your guitar down an octave to record a bassline. It'll sound really thin and weak without it.
#7
Quote by GaryBillington
No it doesn't.


Yes, actually it does. All that thread does is to talk about different DAW software and interfaces. All the other discussions are narrow and relate to specific issues. I gave you very specific information in terms of my equipment and wants and needs.
#8
Quote by chatterbox272
Your questions are basically the same ones we get about 4 times a week. How can I DI guitar, How can I record vocals, What drum software is there.

Answer is the same as all the others, interface + condenser (for vocals) + drum machine software. The combination I would recommend (and use myself) is Focusrite Scarlett 2i4 + Behringer Condenser (C1 for super cheap, B1 for a little more, B2 Pro if possible) + Sennhieser DrumMicA. You could get that entire setup in under $300. If you really wanna go super cheap (sub-$100) then swap the interface for one of those Guitar Links off eBay, and get the C1-U which is USB. That would come out to ~$50-$80.

Also, if you're doing full covers I recommend getting a bass, or using a pitch effect to bring your guitar down an octave to record a bassline. It'll sound really thin and weak without it.


Thanks. When you say condenser, are you referring to a mic? Also, would you just plug the mic directly into your interface? I did this with my M-Audio and the vocals were extremely low. I did everything to ensure that it was plugged in correctly and, after numerous web posts, no one could detect a problem. I don't want the same think to happen again.
#9
Quote by selftaught1000
Yes, actually it does. All that thread does is to talk about different DAW software and interfaces. All the other discussions are narrow and relate to specific issues. I gave you very specific information in terms of my equipment and wants and needs.

...which are exactly the same as other people looking in the thread. You want to record guitar and vocals. That's it, nothing incredibly complicated that the thread doesn't cover. If you search, there are even guides in this forum to program your own drum tracks with the most basic of software and knowledge.

Quote by selftaught1000
Thanks. When you say condenser, are you referring to a mic? Also, would you just plug the mic directly into your interface? I did this with my M-Audio and the vocals were extremely low. I did everything to ensure that it was plugged in correctly and, after numerous web posts, no one could detect a problem. I don't want the same think to happen again.

Yes, a condenser is a type of microphone - there are several different types of condenser microphone, but generally people refer to Large Diaphragm Condensers (e.g. Neumann U87) or Small Diaphragm Condensers (e.g. Rode NT5).

Maybe your interface has low output preamps, or you were using it incorrectly. If you were using a condenser mic, you would need Phantom Power to get any signal at all, so I doubt it's that, but were you using an XLR cable and plugging the mic into a mic preamp input?
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#10
Your condenser mic probably required phantom power and you didn't push the phantom power switch on your interface, hence, no vocals. RTFM

Recording is a skill that requires as much technical knowledge and ability as playing an instrument well. It is not for everybody. If you have never done any successful recording at all I suggest you start at square one and really learn the nuts and bolts.

iphone, iRig HD, Tascam iM2 and GarageBand app will reward a talented artist with rather stunning results for very little $$. Once you figure out how to use this stuff effectively, you will have a clear idea about your next step. Or you may find that recording requires too much left brain and is best done by skilled engineers who understand the process well.

This was recorded 100% iphone apps with iM2 and he shot the iphone video after the music was recorded. The mics you see in the vid are props.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P5PJloYN3pk
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Mar 2, 2014,
#11
Quote by diabolical


Thanks. Is this the software that you use? Do you find the editing easy? Is there a large online community? Is the user manual comprehensive? Also, does it record the vocals loud simply by plugging the mic into the interface?

Also, could you tell me how the setup will work. Obviously, I will be running a cable from the guitar to the input on the front of my Vox amp. As this picture shows, there are two outputs in the back: R and L/mono.

http://i41.photobucket.com/albums/e255/securesomeone/002.jpg

Obviously, I have to plug a cable into one of these and run it to the Audiobox. Which output on the Vox would I plug it into and which input on the Audiobox would it be run to?

Additionally, would there be some advantage to plugging cables into both the R and L/mono outputs? Say I were recording two guitar parts: the main guitar and the solo. Would it make sense to do the second guitar part out of the other output? Would these create an effect of the main guitar coming out of one speaker and the solo the other?
#12
Quote by DisarmGoliath
...which are exactly the same as other people looking in the thread. You want to record guitar and vocals. That's it, nothing incredibly complicated that the thread doesn't cover. If you search, there are even guides in this forum to program your own drum tracks with the most basic of software and knowledge.


Yes, a condenser is a type of microphone - there are several different types of condenser microphone, but generally people refer to Large Diaphragm Condensers (e.g. Neumann U87) or Small Diaphragm Condensers (e.g. Rode NT5).

Maybe your interface has low output preamps, or you were using it incorrectly. If you were using a condenser mic, you would need Phantom Power to get any signal at all, so I doubt it's that, but were you using an XLR cable and plugging the mic into a mic preamp input?


I was just a standard mic with the XLR cable and plugging it directly into the interface. It had a round head--an old fashioned looking mic. I question whether it was a condenser mic.
#13
Quote by Cajundaddy
Your condenser mic probably required phantom power and you didn't push the phantom power switch on your interface, hence, no vocals. RTFM

Recording is a skill that requires as much technical knowledge and ability as playing an instrument well. It is not for everybody. If you have never done any successful recording at all I suggest you start at square one and really learn the nuts and bolts.

iphone, iRig HD, Tascam iM2 and GarageBand app will reward a talented artist with rather stunning results for very little $$. Once you figure out how to use this stuff effectively, you will have a clear idea about your next step. Or you may find that recording requires too much left brain and is best done by skilled engineers who understand the process well.

This was recorded 100% iphone apps with iM2 and he shot the iphone video after the music was recorded. The mics you see in the vid are props.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P5PJloYN3pk


Hello. Yes, that sounds good. But I don't have an I-phone. Also, although I don't know a lot about computers, I think I have the determination to get the job done. I think that it makes sense for me to try to use DAW considering the nature of the songs that I'm recording. Also, I live in an apartment building in a small studio apartment, and I can't be playing through an amp a lot, if at all. When you record directly into the computer with an "amp box," the only noise comes through the headphones that are plugged into the amp box (or I guess it might be plugged into the interface). Yes, I would have to record the vocals, but the vocals are more like talking than singing, and my guess is that I could do that on a separate track. In other words, I won't have to sing while I'm playing and can just record myself singing while listen to the guitar parts I've already recorded coming out of the speaker.

Thanks.
#14
Quote by diabolical


Also, how do you make drum tracks with this software? Or do you recommend some other way. I am speaking in general now.

I appear to have the following software, which I've never really used:

Home Studio 2
Cakewalk Kinetic
Cakewalk Pyro
M-Audio Pro Sessions sound and loop libraries Audio/Wav demo

This software is not intalled on my computer. I'd prefer to use more modern software if it is easier.
#16
Quote by selftaught1000
Yes, I would have to record the vocals, but the vocals are more like talking than singing, and my guess is that I could do that on a separate track. In other words, I won't have to sing while I'm playing and can just record myself singing while listen to the guitar parts I've already recorded coming out of the speaker.

Thanks.


Yes that's called multi-track recording. One of the many fine inventions of Les Paul. "Record drums, play back drums while recording guitar, play back instruments while singing vocals." You can do that with a smartphone DAW app, computer DAW with interface, handheld 4T recorder like a Tascam or Zoom H4, stand alone DAW like Roland or Fostex. They all work and they can all deliver stunning results with a bit of skill.

Choose your weapon and learn to use it well. Small budget? Start very small and grow your gear along with your skills. Another quick sample:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogKvZr5Gw-k
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Mar 4, 2014,
#17
Home Studio 2 will probably work.

Studio One (Presonus) has a built in drum machine (Impact) that loads any audio sample but a lot of people get other plugins, like EZDrummer, or similar because they come with ready made midi beats.

Lots of options on software. You can possibly start with something simple, like Tracktion, Mixcraft, Garageband (Mac only), Magix, Sony Acid Music Studio, Magix Guitar studio, N-Track, Energy XT, etc...
#18
Quote by selftaught1000
Also, how do you make drum tracks with this software?


Youtube tutorial on Impact drum machine (Studio One) will show you pretty much how to use it.
http://youtu.be/lLojpzGvgEA

Quote by selftaught1000
Is this the software that you use? Do you find the editing easy? Is there a large online community? Is the user manual comprehensive? Also, does it record the vocals loud simply by plugging the mic into the interface?


I use S1 and many others, but it is currently my main one. Manual is good, forum is also good, tech support is also very responsive.

Quote by selftaught1000

Also, could you tell me how the setup will work. Obviously, I will be running a cable from the guitar to the input on the front of my Vox amp. As this picture shows, there are two outputs in the back: R and L/mono.


Look at the video/how to record demo with Audiobox:
http://www.presonus.com/products/AudioBox-USB/media

As far as your guitar - you can record direct and add Ampire (as shown in video), use mics to mic your amp/amps, or record your Tonelab direct, either mono (just one side) or in stereo and pan tracks l/r for wider sounding guitar tracks.
Last edited by diabolical at Mar 4, 2014,
#19
Quote by diabolical
Youtube tutorial on Impact drum machine (Studio One) will show you pretty much how to use it.
http://youtu.be/lLojpzGvgEA


I use S1 and many others, but it is currently my main one. Manual is good, forum is also good, tech support is also very responsive.


Look at the video/how to record demo with Audiobox:
http://www.presonus.com/products/AudioBox-USB/media

As far as your guitar - you can record direct and add Ampire (as shown in video), use mics to mic your amp/amps, or record your Tonelab direct, either mono (just one side) or in stereo and pan tracks l/r for wider sounding guitar tracks.


I'm probably going to go with the PreSonus kit. It seems like it has all the essentials and I don't want to go too cheap. I found it for $200. We'll see how it goes. Thanks for sticking with me.