#1
Hey everybody thanks for reading. I've been playing guitar for about a year and a half, and my calluses still aren't very thick. I play for about 6 hours a day and play lots of blues stuff/a lot of note bending. The problem is that I can never really play as long as a want to because my fingertips are always raw. They look kind of like a jaw breaker as in there's always multiple layers of skin worn down, and they grow back thicker but not thick enough!

I give them time to heal by playing more rhythm guitar for a day or two until they don't hurt, so it's not that they don't get a chance to heal. Is it that I haven't been playing long enough? I have skinny fingers as well could that be it? And is there anyway I can form better calluses?

Thanks
Last edited by boltsfan23 at Mar 1, 2014,
#2
For me the white breaking points (skin change) on top of calluses stopped at around 1.6 years or something like that. Everyones skin is different! Don't worry and don't start pressing harder on frets on purpose, it comes with time I also have skinny fingers.
#3
You do not necessarily require this. Novices tend to hurt their fingers because they apply pressure much more than necessary, this is a necessary part of learning.

After achieving a degree of success in technique, up to a point that you are somewhat comfortable you must then proceed to re-arrange your playing by paying attention to how much pressure you are applying and how much is needed and gradually lowering it and incorporating this as a practice.

As I see technique mastery, it is about reaching a certain point and then taking a look back and amending the mistake in your technique that was necessary for you to have made progress in the first place.

Now that you have learned to extract the desired sound in a fashion that is somewhat comfortable, you will now practice to do that with as little energy expenditure as possible, consciously lowering the pressure while maintaining the result until it becomes a part of your habit.
#4
Calluses will toughen with time and regular practice. You can also speed up the process by sliding the fingers up and down the lower (thicker) strings for a few minutes daily. But practice and persevere and they will get tougher.
#5
Quote by Vanhalaf
You do not necessarily require this. Novices tend to hurt their fingers because they apply pressure much more than necessary, this is a necessary part of learning.

After achieving a degree of success in technique, up to a point that you are somewhat comfortable you must then proceed to re-arrange your playing by paying attention to how much pressure you are applying and how much is needed and gradually lowering it and incorporating this as a practice.

As I see technique mastery, it is about reaching a certain point and then taking a look back and amending the mistake in your technique that was necessary for you to have made progress in the first place.

Now that you have learned to extract the desired sound in a fashion that is somewhat comfortable, you will now practice to do that with as little energy expenditure as possible, consciously lowering the pressure while maintaining the result until it becomes a part of your habit.


thanks I think you may be right that i'm pressing too hard on the frets... I really go at it a lot of the time and I play with high action also... I'll definitely work on this
#6
I never developed calluses. Been playing a bit over 9 years. Over time, I just got used to it, and learned to not fret hard which reduced the pain. My fretting hand's fingertips are still soft, the skin is just a bit thicker compared to my picking hand.

All I can suggest is to set up your guitar so the action is lower, and consciously work on fretting as lightly as possible. Fretting too hard also involves unnecessary tension.
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