#1
Just wondering what are people thought's on 24 fret guitars 25 scale and if i should get one ?

I have been playing 22fret for years les paul and its a greats guitar but i have advanced over the years, I am 6ft5 big long hands and i have always felt cramped going past the 14 fret soloing shredding and trying to do bend with the thin frets , I would probably never use the 24 fret but maybe i will feel more comfortable playing a bit lower down . .
#2
The number of frets doesn't really matter, what you're thinking about is the scale length. The longer the scale length is, the larger the space in between each fret will be.

25.5" is the standard scale length. Les Pauls and their ilk have shorter 24.75" scales.

PRS guitars often use an odd scale of 25", that feels in between a Les Paul type and a Strat type.

You can also get baritone gutiars with 26.5" or 27" scales. Some manufacturers such as Agile also offer guitars with 28.625" scales, and then of course there is short bass scale, which is 30".
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#3
Quote by Offworld92
The number of frets doesn't really matter, what you're thinking about is the scale length. The longer the scale length is, the larger the space in between each fret will be.

25.5" is the standard scale length. Les Pauls and their ilk have shorter 24.75" scales.

PRS guitars often use an odd scale of 25", that feels in between a Les Paul type and a Strat type.

You can also get baritone gutiars with 26.5" or 27" scales. Some manufacturers such as Agile also offer guitars with 28.625" scales, and then of course there is short bass scale, which is 30".

Yes i don't think i would want to go passed a 25 scale most guitars i have seen with a 25.5 scale have 24 frets in fact most ST models Ibanze or ESP are 24 frets where the LP models are about 24.72inch scale with 24 or 22 frets ! Thats why i am thinking to try the ST models with a 25.5 scale jumbo frets with 24 frets which i think i am right in saying will give me more room for my fingers .
Last edited by dazzzer30 at Mar 1, 2014,
#4
25.5 inch scale length sounds like the best bet for you to try, if you are quite used to a Les Paul I would try the ESP MH, it is a Strat type body but thicker, and with an arch top IIRC, so will feel quite Les Paul like, at least to me they do.
#5
Also know that "jumbo frets" also has nothing to do with the width between frets, but describes the size of the actual fret wire.

And still 22 vs 24 frets won't affect any of the lower frets. 24 frets just pushes the neck pickup closer to the bridge to make space for them.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#6
Quote by Offworld92
The number of frets doesn't really matter, what you're thinking about is the scale length. The longer the scale length is, the larger the space in between each fret will be.

PRS guitars often use an odd scale of 25", that feels in between a Les Paul type and a Strat type.


25" isn't really all that odd a scale; Carvin have been using it for maybe 20 years as well. I've got Carvins with 24.75" scale, 25" scale and one very rare neck-through with a 25.5" scale. All but the longer scale guitar have 24 frets.

Offworld92 is right; the number of frets doesn't make much difference to you if you've got big hands, but the scale certainly does, and maybe the width of the fretboard...and maybe the radius. I've got XXL glove size hands, and while I'm playing pretty much everything that comes along, I've found that I really appreciate a guitar with several characteristics: a 25.5" or longer scale, a fairly wide fretboard, a fairly flat fretboard (15-16" radius and up), 24 frets clear of the body, jumbo frets and a fairly wide distance between the neck and the inside of the "horn" on a cutaway curve (or a smaller horn altogether).

Agile's semi-custom choices allow you to pick up an LP style guitar with several choices of longer scale, a "wide" neck profile (1 3/4" at the nut, anyway), 24 frets, and their smaller cutaway horn means that I don't have to rotate my hand to get at the upper frets.

Gibson's old L6S is a singlecut with 24 frets and a very wide cutaway, but the originals have a 1 9/16" nut width and a 24.7" scale (Gibson's nominal scale is 24.75" but is often closer to 24.6" in actuality).

One of the most comfortable guitars I've ever played was a Soloway (www.jimsoloway.com or www.solowayguitars.com, though I think Doug Kauer has taken over building most of his guitar designs) "Single 15." The body is nearly perfect -- it's a carved-out semi-hollow that's fairly thin, with a "bent" top (it's actually carved that way, not bent) that's really comfortable for your forearm, a very generous tummy cut (Jim's actually skinny, so we call it a rib cut) and a wide cutaway (the guitar, overall, is amazing for seated playing and upper fret access). His fretboard is a 16" radius and you can get both a 25.5" and a 27" scale tuned to standard. He also offers a 1 13/16" nut width (he originally called it a "fingerstyle" width) that maintains that extra 1/8" all the way to the bridge. It's extremely comfortable and a joy to play, but it'll cost you over $three large to get one new.

I'm currently spending a lot of time with the Variax JTV-89F. The other two Variax body styles -- the LP-like JTV-59 and the Strat-alike JTV-69 -- are bigger sellers, and at one point, I thought I'd get the 59 simply because I play a lot of LPs. But it's a 24.75" scale with a 12" radius. The 89F may actually be the best of the Variax bunch, however. 25.5" scale, 16" radius, 24 frets clear, fairly wide cutaway, wide fretboard, jumbo frets, slightly thinner neck profile, and it's the only one with a Floyd. Even if you hate using trems, there are two reasons why that's a bonus. One, the guitar is rarely out of tune thanks to the double locking nature of the trem. Two, I think the Graphtech piezo saddles are actually better with the Variax firmware than the LR Baggs piezos that come stock with the other Variax guitars. And finally, I think the control layout on the 89 is optimal for the whole Variax thing.
#7
Quote by Offworld92
Also know that "jumbo frets" also has nothing to do with the width between frets, but describes the size of the actual fret wire.

And still 22 vs 24 frets won't affect any of the lower frets. 24 frets just pushes the neck pickup closer to the bridge to make space for them.


For those of us with big hands/fingers, jumbo (or at least taller) frets can be more comfortable and certainly make bending/vibrato a bit easier.

You're right in one way that 24 frets moves the neck pickup closer to the bridge, but on my LP style guitars, the better setup is to put the 24th fret right where the 22nd fret would be (usually about even with the bottom of the cutaway). Three things happen. One, the neck is extended by about 3/4". Two, since the neck pickup stays where it is, the bridge and the bridge pickup move TOWARD the neck pickup about the same distance. Three, this gives you much better access to the upper frets (the 22nd fret is now sort of "out in the wind"). Often that means that you don't have to rotate your hand in order to get to the upper frets.
#8
As many others have pointed out the fret spacing will be larger, and if you use the same gauge strings for the same tuning that you're used to there will be a little bit more tension on a longer scale. Plus side, longer scales are better for drop tunings.
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#9
Quote by dspellman
For those of us with big hands/fingers, jumbo (or at least taller) frets can be more comfortable and certainly make bending/vibrato a bit easier.

You're right in one way that 24 frets moves the neck pickup closer to the bridge, but on my LP style guitars, the better setup is to put the 24th fret right where the 22nd fret would be (usually about even with the bottom of the cutaway). Three things happen. One, the neck is extended by about 3/4". Two, since the neck pickup stays where it is, the bridge and the bridge pickup move TOWARD the neck pickup about the same distance. Three, this gives you much better access to the upper frets (the 22nd fret is now sort of "out in the wind"). Often that means that you don't have to rotate your hand in order to get to the upper frets.


You're right on every count, but I simply don't think that there are really any common production guitars out that actually do that. Some rarer/ more obscure stuff for sure, but... eh.
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#10
Quote by Offworld92
You're right on every count, but I simply don't think that there are really any common production guitars out that actually do that. Some rarer/ more obscure stuff for sure, but... eh.


Some of the ESP-type LPs do that. Check out the ESP-LTD EC-1000FM Thomann Edition, for example.

The Agile AL-2000 Floyd does that (and that silly inexpensive guitar also has a "tilted" neck heel that works pretty much as well as my Axcess).

The Agile AL-3100 Floyd will *sometimes* come with 24 frets done as mentioned, and sometimes with just 22. Must be a whim of the Korean factory <G>

The 24-fret Carvin carved-top guitars do that (compared to their 22 versions of the same guitar). The 24-fret neck-through SC90 Carvin does that.