#1
Hi there,
I'm after opinions for the best blues tuition book/DVD course.
I've heard of blues you can use which I like the look of but Dosent have any videos.
Listening to 'old BB king/SRV live recordings' isn't the answer I'm looking for thanks.

Any helpful advice appreciated
#2
Youtube now has some of the best tutorials I have seen yet on the blues.
Robben Ford is great: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zGlVdwQPNLw

Trufire.com is great also and it's all free.

Now go play sumpthin!
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#3
Cool, will have a look. Cheers.

Any other opinions on books/DVDs still appreciated
#5
Transcribe solos of your favorite blues guitarists and learn them.

Don't cost nothin'.

Do you want to sound like Marty Schwartz or SRV/B.B. King/Clapton/etc.
Last edited by Virgman at Mar 2, 2014,
#6
Quote by Virgman
Transcribe solos of your favorite blues guitarists and learn them.

Don't cost nothin'.

Do you want to sound like Marty Schwartz or SRV/B.B. King/Clapton/etc.


That's how SRV et al all did it.

Listen to records and work it out. You will be a better player for it. I don't know of any famous blues or rock player who didn't go down that route.
#7
As said, learning songs by the musicians you enjoy by ear is the best way to go about it. Doesn't matter which style you are trying to learn, going to the source (the recordings) and learning from them is the best way to go about things. That way you learn material, you learn what types of expression they use (how is the articulation in different styles and players different, how does the way they play a the same phrase differ).

You can find this very easily in blues. There are phrases that BB King, SRV and Hendrix all played, but yet you can hear who is playing.

As said, learning from the source, the masters, is the way to go. Especially if you can develop your ear at the same time. They did it, all the old jazz cats learned from the ones that came before them. The blues legends learned from the ones that came before them. The rock players learned from the ones that came before them. If you really think about it, learning by tab or sheet music is a luxury we have received quite recently (if we leave classical out of this). Tabs for songs became more common in the 70's and 80's, but they were still not easy to get hold of, the books often cost much and sometimes you could be lucky to get it in a cheaper magazine. Since the birth of the internet we have gotten lazy as a community. I am not saying it's bad using tablature to start out learning. But in my opinion, if the greats learned by ear, then you should strive for that too.

Best Regards
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
Last edited by Sickz at Mar 4, 2014,
#8
I'll repeat what everyone else is telling you here - if you want to play blues, you need to learn songs and solos by ear. It takes time and a lot of practice, but it's the only way to really do it if you want to develop the right skills to be a blues player. Pick a song and go for it. Trial and error.
#9
Quote by Virgman


Do you want to sound like Marty Schwartz or SRV/B.B. King/Clapton/etc.


The original poster asked about DVD lessons and I've found Marty's lessons to be totally great. If the OP doesn't understand the basics of playing the blues then listening to SRV or anyone else isn't going to be very useful.
#10
Quote by Rapid One
If the OP doesn't understand the basics of playing the blues then listening to SRV or anyone else isn't going to be very useful.


Agreed. I agree absolutely with copying the greats (and sometimes from teachers you're sort of getting a crappier version that's been dumbed/watered down), but if you're just starting out telling someone to copy complex stuff by ear is a bit like telling someone who wants maths lessons that they should work out calculus from first principles themselves. Eventually- sure. From the get-go... I dunno. That's not how I'd do it. Get a teacher or an instructional book or trawl youtube for lessons or something like that.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#11
Quote by Dave_Mc
Agreed. I agree absolutely with copying the greats (and sometimes from teachers you're sort of getting a crappier version that's been dumbed/watered down), but if you're just starting out telling someone to copy complex stuff by ear is a bit like telling someone who wants maths lessons that they should work out calculus from first principles themselves. Eventually- sure. From the get-go... I dunno. That's not how I'd do it. Get a teacher or an instructional book or trawl youtube for lessons or something like that.


A basic blues solo is a simple as music gets. I learnt my first solo by ear ( by necessity, there was no tab for that solo). It took me like 5 hours to learn 10 seconds of music, but the exercise was invaluable. It's not that difficult if you take on something slow.

Dvd's and videos and tabs are fine and have their place, but they're all crutches and training wheels. Blues is by almost definition the simplest form of music around, it's the perfect genre to start learning things by ear with. There's really no excuse.

OP - use what you need to keep yourself motivated and moving forward. However, understand that if you want to get to a point where you can improvise a solo that is more than just a series of patterns, you need to train your ear. Tabs, DVD's and you tube won't make that happen.

If you think I'm out to lunch, here's a link to an interview with Guthrie Govan, arguably the best rock/prog guitar player in the world today, where he lays it out(jump to the question about transcribing Robben Ford and Ygnwie and read from there):

http://www.premierguitar.com/articl...ie_Govan_So_Far
#12
I never said you shouldn't train your ear. But jumping in at the deep end isn't always the best approach.

I love guthrie govan, but check out greg koch's book guitar clues (something like that- you can look inside it on amazon). he's a respected player and teacher too and he agrees with me. We can all find pro players who agree with us, it doesn't mean they're all right necessarily (especially when they disagree).
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#13
My initial post may sound as i am saying just go for the ear from the start, but i agree with you fully Dave.

I personally didn't start learning by ear. I played for 3-4 years before i even took up learning by ear, which was a mistake, but that's beside the point.

When starting out DVD's, books and the internet are great recourses. TS, i recommend you check out Justinguitar's course on blues. He touches on the subject of both blues rhythm and lead guitar. Justin is a great teacher and has very good material for a beginner to start out with, and with many styles. Best of all is that it's free.

Other than that, learning from tabs is great, you just have to be careful cause many tabs have errors in them. I just want to emphasize that you should try and learn simple stuff by ear, even now. Build on it, cause what you want (eventually) is to be able to learn songs purely by ear. That way you are not reliant on tabs, videos or sheets to learn songs. I also recommend getting software to aid you with this, like amazing slow downer.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#14
Quote by Dave_Mc
I never said you shouldn't train your ear. But jumping in at the deep end isn't always the best approach.

I love guthrie govan, but check out greg koch's book guitar clues (something like that- you can look inside it on amazon). he's a respected player and teacher too and he agrees with me. We can all find pro players who agree with us, it doesn't mean they're all right necessarily (especially when they disagree).


I guess it depends on the player. You make good points. I just hate to see people omit learning by ear as part of their guitar development.
#15
^ Yeah, I'm certainly not saying that you shouldn't learn by ear or anything like that. Absolutely not, that's not what I'm about at all. In fact when I used to play piano and drums I used to get into trouble for playing too much by ear and not enough from the music. I just think that, while you should start early with the easy stuff as sickz said, using tabs and/or music (and/or lessons) alongside it has its place too. You sort of need a certain level of competence to know that what you're doing by ear is correct, and at the start if you don't have that, (correct) tabs or music will stop you from actually playing the thing incorrectly and not realising it!

The other problem is, sometimes things don't click the way they should if you aren't told it in black and white- you can be fumbling about in the dark wasting time if you aren't careful. Just as a personal example, I used to always do the blues curl (minor 3rd bent slightly sharp) thing (so I guess my ears mustn't be too bad)- but I just sort of did it automatically, I didn't really realise what I was doing or why, I just heard all the lead players I liked doing it. It's only when I looked more into theory that I realised why I was doing it, and now I can target that thing specifically and know exactly what I'm doing with it and what it's for (I think ).

Quote by Sickz
My initial post may sound as i am saying just go for the ear from the start, but i agree with you fully Dave.

I personally didn't start learning by ear. I played for 3-4 years before i even took up learning by ear, which was a mistake, but that's beside the point.

When starting out DVD's, books and the internet are great recourses. TS, i recommend you check out Justinguitar's course on blues. He touches on the subject of both blues rhythm and lead guitar. Justin is a great teacher and has very good material for a beginner to start out with, and with many styles. Best of all is that it's free.

Other than that, learning from tabs is great, you just have to be careful cause many tabs have errors in them. I just want to emphasize that you should try and learn simple stuff by ear, even now. Build on it, cause what you want (eventually) is to be able to learn songs purely by ear. That way you are not reliant on tabs, videos or sheets to learn songs. I also recommend getting software to aid you with this, like amazing slow downer.




In fact when I started playing guitar the internet guitar tab thing was just starting (or at least I wasn't aware of it ) so I actually did try learning by ear quite early on if there was stuff I wanted to learn which I didn't have the tab for in books or guitar mags. I'm not sure how much use it was- it probably helped my ear, but I didn't really have the background yet in guitar to really be playing things right, either. I was probably playing the right notes, just not really playing it the way a more experienced guitar player would play it, so I was probably making it hard on myself. If you're actually playing stuff incorrectly, sometimes you can be doing more harm than good (same goes for practising bad habits on guitar etc.).

I probably had the opposite problem from you- I tried it too early and then that put me off

And that's a great point about tabs often not being right- when I say "feel free to use tabs and/or sheet music", I mean to use that in combination with your ears as well, to make sure it's correct. Also, a lot of guitar-specific techniques are very difficult to tab exactly right, too- things like vibrato, slightly sharp bends etc., if tabbed at all, will often be tabbed in the absolute most basic way (i.e. not really the way it is on the original recording). So you have to use your ears as well.

Actually what I normally do is get the rough gist from tabs and then wing the rest of it- so I'm sort of getting the benefit from tabs of being able to learn the rough gist of the song pretty quickly, but also am using my ears a fair bit as well. This isn't really a plan, more that I'm kind of lazy and impatient so I'm not necessarily suggesting this method as the "correct" way to do it

I really must get one of those slower downer things.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Mar 5, 2014,