#1
I am a strong believer in learning from the best. I believe sometimes its even a good idea to avoid taking advice from high intermediate/ low advanced players because even they can teach you technique that you will later have to unlearn so you can learn superior technique. Breaking habits can be hard and very time consuming.

However I also believe there is more to it than that, you can find incredible players that make lousy teachers. Some even put together a whole bunch of exercises without much thought or benefit to the user as there name alone will sell the dvd etc. Therefore following the statement that "the proof is in the pudding", i think a great way to decide if a learning resource is worth it or not is to look at those that have studied it.

Speed kills, speed kills 2, speed kills 3 and star licks by michael angelo batio fit into the category of learning material i am searching for. They were written by one of the greatest virtuoso's of all time and studied by: dimebag darrel, john petrucci, michael romeo of symphony x, and one of the dragonforce guitarists (can't remember which one).

The purpose of this thread is to find similar learning resources, who was it written by, and who has studied it?

thanks in advance for any recommendations
Last edited by Iain Greig at Mar 1, 2014,
#2
I don't think there's much use in looking at what a good player learned from as a means of telling how good it is. I think the important thing is not what you learn from but how you learn. Chalking up the skills of someone like Michael Romeo to any single thing is insanity; his skill is the result of both years of practice and a massive amount of material studied, the same can be said of anyone who's any good. Hell, at the very worst someone could have studied something like MAB's videos and decided to completely ignore them!

Decent enough idea but I don't think there's anything to really be gained from this.
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#3
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
I don't think there's much use in looking at what a good player learned from as a means of telling how good it is. I think the important thing is not what you learn from but how you learn. Chalking up the skills of someone like Michael Romeo to any single thing is insanity; his skill is the result of both years of practice and a massive amount of material studied, the same can be said of anyone who's any good. Hell, at the very worst someone could have studied something like MAB's videos and decided to completely ignore them!

Decent enough idea but I don't think there's anything to really be gained from this.


wasn't suggesting that, of course there is more to it than just one single thing, and no one gets good without years of practice and discipline, what i am trying to say is there are very efficient ways of practicing and there are far less efficient ways. A resource that several great guitarists have studied is far more likely to keep you on the right track. I personally have gained a lot more from my first 20 hours of practicing MABs stuff than first 20 hours of practicing any other resource. I want to find something else that will give me the same benefits. As for massive amounts of material studied, i don't think this is quite as important as how efficient that studying is, a jack of all trades is a master of none. Did you know slash doesn't even know the modes?
Last edited by Iain Greig at Mar 2, 2014,
#4
Quote by Iain Greig
A resource that several great guitarists have studied is far more likely to keep you on the right track.


With that argument you are far better studying pieces that you enjoy and learning them by ear. That's what all the greats did, and i am not just talking shred guitarists. All the jazzers learned from imitating the ones before them, all the blues players learned by imitating the ones before them, all the shred guys learned from imitating the ones before them. As long as you pick anything you can't do yet and practice it with good technique, that is a great resource.

Quote by Iain Greig

Did you know slash doesn't even know the modes?


Doesn't matter. Modes =/= good musician. He doesn't need to know modes cause he has good ears, that's the way he have learned. He can play within the pentatonic or major/minor scales and add accidentals were he think it fits, that's all you need to know. It is extremely rare that music these days is modal, most of it can be seen as keys.

I still recommend learning from the players you enjoy, but doing so by ear and good practice habits. That, dedication and time is all you really need.
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#5
I'm watching this thread hoping it goes somewhere other than downhill...

Modes are so misunderstood, for the most part nowadays they've become little more than fancy names that pompous guitarists cling to and covet as some kind of holy grail of knowledge. The reality is in modern music they're largely redundant. Slash doesn't "know modes" because they're pretty much useless in the genre of music he plays.
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#6
Quote by steven seagull
Slash doesn't "know modes" because they're pretty much useless in the genre of music he plays.


thats pretty much the point i was trying to make, he doesn't know them because they are not totally necessary. The quality of what is studied is far more important than quantity.
Last edited by Iain Greig at Mar 2, 2014,
#7
Quote by Iain Greig
As for massive amounts of material studied, i don't think this is quite as important as how efficient that studying is, a jack of all trades is a master of none. Did you know slash doesn't even know the modes?


By massive amounts of material I didn't mean necessarily different concepts, every great guitarist has spent literally years learning and learning from the material that came before them; they are the product of thousands of hours spent playing and studying music. No exceptions.

Again, though, I think the main issue is that you're making assumptions about the quality of something based on who used it, which is pretty flawed in general in my opinion:



      R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

      Quote by Master Foo
      “A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


      Album.
      Legion.
      #8
      Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
      By massive amounts of material I didn't mean necessarily different concepts, every great guitarist has spent literally years learning and learning from the material that came before them; they are the product of thousands of hours spent playing and studying music. No exceptions.

      Again, though, I think the main issue is that you're making assumptions about the quality of something based on who used it, which is pretty flawed in general in my opinion:





          well your right, the truth is we can never be sure how good a resource will be for ourselves until we have tried it, we can only use clues as guidance.
          #9
          Good players learn continuously from all the music they hear and play. If legendary players studied one book, they probably studied a dozen, and countless recordings.

          As for your own development, try to divide your time between methodical skills-related study, and actually learning music. And most importantly, apply your skills to the music. Lots of players can run scales, but can't play solos, because they never took the time work the technique into anything but their warm ups.
          #10
          @Zaphod

          I love how you brought up how much pebber brown sucks

          https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=52g-18STc0w

          Anyway TS, start reading as many columns and books as possible with your guitar in hand.

          Everyone has their own method, you should find yours

          Speed Kills is more inspiring than informative IMO, Paul Gilbert is a better teacher for shred when it comes to video lessons.

          Pore over diagrams for hours, how do I pick this/how do I fit this together/where have I heard this before kinda deal.

          Work on improvising, techniques don't matter if you can't make music with them.
          Legato and fluidity in your playing is where it's at

          DJENT!!
          ಠ_ಠ
          #11
          Quote by Shredwizard445
          @Zaphod

          I love how you brought up how much pebber brown sucks


          Actually I didn't.

          I said I don't like him; I said nothing about his playing or music. I intensely dislike him as a teacher but that's just about it. I think as a teacher he's too prescriptive about certain aspects of playing (particularly picking) and he doesn't actually practice what he preaches at all (again, particularly with regards to picking) but as a player I actually think he's relatively interesting and that video aside is generally good, in a kind of 80s light fusion-y way.
          R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

          Quote by Master Foo
          “A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


          Album.
          Legion.