#1
Hi there,

I'am learning a song that calls for a capo on the fourth fret. I have tried transposing it up and down but it sounds best with the capo on the fourth fret. I have to play an A chord and because the frets are smaller I really have trouble cramming my fingers on to the sixth fret to make the chord. I can play it but the b string ever so slightly doesn't ring clear. You don't notice it really when I play as the string does pretty much almost rings clear but not quite. Any tips or techniques I could try or am I being overly fussy.
#2
Which fingers are you fretting with? Do you need the high E to sound?
My God, it's full of stars!
#3
I'am using index, middle and third. I was always taught to leave the high e open.
#4
Quote by hellybelly
I'am using index, middle and third. I was always taught to leave the high e open.


You don't really need to leave it open, but if it sounds better with it then go for it.

Use your middle, ring, and pinky finger for that chord to free up space. You don't need to use your index, middle, and ring.
My God, it's full of stars!
Last edited by Dreadnought at Mar 2, 2014,
#6
Quote by Dreadnought
You don't really need to leave it open, but if it sounds better with it then go for it.

Use your middle, ring, and pinky finger for that chord to free up space. You don't need to use your index, middle, and ring.

nice job ! hopefully, your keeping a good eye on my guitar for me still Dread
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#7
Quote by hellybelly
Hi there,

I'am learning a song that calls for a capo on the fourth fret. I have tried transposing it up and down but it sounds best with the capo on the fourth fret. I have to play an A chord and because the frets are smaller I really have trouble cramming my fingers on to the sixth fret to make the chord. I can play it but the b string ever so slightly doesn't ring clear. You don't notice it really when I play as the string does pretty much almost rings clear but not quite. Any tips or techniques I could try or am I being overly fussy.
There are two other ways to finger that open A major shape.

1. Using one finger as a "mini barre", to cover all 3 strings or.....

2. Using the index finger to cover the bottom 2 strings, (D-4 & G-3), and the middle to cover the top string (B-2).

I confess that I've never even used a 3 finger pattern, to make an open A shape, it's exactly what you've said, "too crowded". I only use a 3 finger pattern to create the Amaj7 chord.

Now, you claim the song sounds better when to capo is on the 4th fret, and you've tried transposing it. A major @ the 4th fret, is Db major. You could capo @ the 1st fret, and use the C major open voice to get that Db.

Now, could you link me (or rather us), to a tab of the song? I'd kind of like to know what key we're dealing with, so I could make a more informed suggestion as to alternate chord shapes.

I do in fact often use capos, so no censure here in that regard. I'm also aware the capo gives many songs their signature sound. The first tune that springs to mind is always The Beatles, "Here Comes the Sun".

However, a capo changes the tonality, and when you get much past the 2nd fret, starts to kill the bass. Jus' Sayin'.

There's also a thread currently running, "Good Capo Songs", you might find of interest.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 3, 2014,
#8
Thanks for a great reply. I' am kind of embarrassed to say because I know many of you wont find my music choice as 'cool' etc. But the song I' am learning is by Katy Perry and its called 'If You Can Afford Me'. I' am learning it from a you tube video I saw online.
#9
Quote by hellybelly
Thanks for a great reply. I' am kind of embarrassed to say because I know many of you wont find my music choice as 'cool' etc.
Actually, this sub-forum contains many different age brackets and tastes. So, you needn't concern yourself with that.

Quote by hellybelly
But the song I' am learning is by Katy Perry and its called 'If You Can Afford Me'. I' am learning it from a you tube video I saw online.
I listen to a lot of female vocalists, so I can play along with many of their songs. However, if you're going to try to sing and play the song yourself, (in her key), you need to be a soprano, or sing it one whole octave down!

Sometimes a song's original key is awkward, oftentimes in the case of alto women. Their key is just a twitch too high for male singer, and an octave down is too low. In cases like like that, a man needs to sing at a smaller interval lower, and the key must be changed.

Unfortunately, those actions can change the presentation of a song, and in some extreme cases, it may have to be scrubbed

You can link your video for us, (if you so desire), and post back if you're unclear about what I've said regarding the relationship of keys, and vocal ranges.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 3, 2014,
#10
1. Using one finger an a "mini barre", to cover all 3 strings


This is my preference.