#1
For whatever reason, my playing is a lot better, faster and more fluid on my taylor 214 than my american strat. This is distressing because I would prefer to play electric, especially live, and my strat cost me about $1200 all told. The strat has 10's on it but I've had 11's on it in the past and haven't noticed a difference. The action on the taylor is about as low as it can be without string buzzing and the strat's action is comparably low.

I guess the strat just doesn't feel "beefy" enough. I can't really "dig in" to the notes the way I'd like to. Is there a way to amend this w/ my strat? Or should I just try to trade it in for an electric that resembles my acoustic more? Any recommendations? Unfortunately, I'm left handed so I can't exactly try before I buy.

For what it's worth, I'm going through a TC flashback, a way huge green rhino, a ditto looper, and into a peavey delta blues 115.
#2
What year is your American Strat? The MIA's from the last 3 or 4 years have been very, very smooth Stratocasters. Personally, I tend to prefer the ones from the late 90's/early 00's, only because I really do get a more percussive feel from them. Every Strat is different, though.

That heavy tension can do a lot for feel. That great thump response from Taylor is one that's attempted by other brands. I'm a Taylor player myself, so I know how you feel.

I think for best results, you should slam the trem on your Strat, put on some 13's, and (here's the crazy part) add a little bow to the neck. Yes, add some bow, but just a little.

This will cause you do dig into the notes up the fretboard a little bit. Give it a shot, lemme know what you think.
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#3
It's a 2013 ...by slam the trem, you mean add more springs and put it flush to the body?
#4
If you’re happy with the Strat otherwise than the best option would be to replace the neck similar to your Taylor. It won’t be cheap, but it would probably be less expensive than trading your guitar in toward the purchase of a new one. If you contact Warmoth they can probably tell you which of their neck profiles matches your Taylor.
#5
Quote by jpnyc
If you’re happy with the Strat otherwise than the best option would be to replace the neck similar to your Taylor. It won’t be cheap, but it would probably be less expensive than trading your guitar in toward the purchase of a new one. If you contact Warmoth they can probably tell you which of their neck profiles matches your Taylor.


the neck will make that much of a difference?
#6
Quote by RyanMW2010
the neck will make that much of a difference?


Probably. It’s not like your fretting hand is doing much with the body of the guitar.
#8
Quote by NewDayHappy
Maybe you should consider different pickups.


i was looking at lollar blackfaces, bareknuckle mother's milk and some kleins. The problem is more the 'feel' though, than the tone.
#9
Quote by RyanMW2010
It's a 2013 ...by slam the trem, you mean add more springs and put it flush to the body?



Correct, that will take some of that give out of the action. Try doing some of the setup stuff I suggested before thinking of a neck swap or something to that affect. The C shape on 13' Strats isn't that much smaller than a Vintage Oval, afterall, so other Strat necks will feel ultimately like Strat necks, and won't change that slinky feeling in the strings.

See what you can do in the setup first, because, well, it's free.
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#10
1) don't replace the neck - that will kill its resale value and is not a cost effective solution

2) if you want to be able to "dig in more" you probably require a larger string gauge . Try 12's or 13's ( which are common acoustic gauges) and see if that helps. You"ll need to have your guitar setup by a tech to adjust for those gauges. Stevie Ray vaughan used those gauges because he had a really heavy hand.

3) playing electric requires a different approach than acoustic. You have to practice and adapt to the instrument's strenghts and weaknesses. An acoustic is more percussive and you get more mileage out of open notes and open chord voicings.
Last edited by reverb66 at Mar 6, 2014,
#11
As a Taylor owner myself, I noted fairly early on that their frets are on the small side. Smaller than Fender's if I recall my MIA Strat correctly. This may be a factor in how the guitar feels to you and maybe why you can play more comfortably.
Moving on.....
#12
Quote by reverb66
1) don't replace the neck - that will kill its resale value and is not a cost effective solution

2) if you want to be able to "dig in more" you probably require a larger string gauge . Try 12's or 13's ( which are common acoustic gauges) and see if that helps. You"ll need to have your guitar setup by a tech to adjust for those gauges. Stevie Ray vaughan used those gauges because he had a really heavy hand.

3) playing electric requires a different approach than acoustic. You have to practice and adapt to the instrument's strenghts and weaknesses. An acoustic is more percussive and you get more mileage out of open notes and open chord voicings.


It's really more the "snap" I get out of the taylor while playing lead licks that I favor. The Strat just feels so "loose" to me in comparison. I've played as heavy as 11's on it and 12's on my MIM Tele, but that was long ago. Do smaller scaled guitars, like Les Pauls and the like, feel like they have more tension? For some reason I always felt like the arch top semi-hollows would play more like acoustics. Forgive me, I'm left handed and can't really get a good feel for a guitar from playing it upside down. I've never played a gibson LP or Es-335.
#13
Slap on 13s and raise the action on that bitch. It'll fight back.
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#14
Quote by Offworld92
Slap on 13s and raise the action on that bitch. It'll fight back.


will that be detrimental to my playing, long term? I should mention it's pretty hard to bend G string and lower more than a half step on my taylor.
#15
Quote by RyanMW2010
For whatever reason, my playing is a lot better, faster and more fluid on my taylor 214 than my american strat. This is distressing because I would prefer to play electric, especially live, and my strat cost me about $1200 all told. The strat has 10's on it but I've had 11's on it in the past and haven't noticed a difference. The action on the taylor is about as low as it can be without string buzzing and the strat's action is comparably low.


Practice.
The two are different guitars -- you simply haven't gotten familiar enough with the electric yet. There's also this; it's an ELECTRIC. You're supposed to let the electric part do more of the work. 10's are fine, as are 9's. You're supposed to have a different technique on the electric as opposed to the acoustic. Don't try to make one like the other.

Quote by RyanMW2010

For what it's worth, I'm going through a TC flashback, a way huge green rhino, a ditto looper, and into a peavey delta blues 115.


None of which matters.

If you're really having issues and are unwilling to put in the work to learn to play the electric as it should be played, go talk to Bob Taylor and get a Taylor with a better pickup system (the 814ce is my personal favorite). Or take a look at a Taylor T5 and see if that will get you closer.
#16
I feel like Strats slow me down, truth be told.

Why not try something without that glossy feel to the neck? My hand kinda sticks to that and it slows me down, maybe same thing is happening to you?

Hit a guitar place and try an LPJ or something that isn't all glossed up and see what you think.
May very well just be your hands not working/sliding well with that type of neck.
#17
Quote by JustRooster
I think for best results, you should slam the trem on your Strat, put on some 13's, and (here's the crazy part) add a little bow to the neck. Yes, add some bow, but just a little.


If he does everything you suggested he won't need to add any extra bow at all

The comment about changing your playing stills is pretty accurate, considering you won't be able to get your acoustic to feel like your electric 100% and vice versa. How long have you had the strat? I'd give it some time before you start panicking, maybe a week or two of constant playing before your hands adjust to the different feel of an electric guitar.

I play with 13s on my Martin, and when you consider the higher action, it gives me much more fight than, lets say, a strat with 9s strung on it. After playing one for a long time, the other will feel foreign, but it's generally a phase and not something permanent.
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#18
Quote by megano28
If he does everything you suggested he won't need to add any extra bow at all

The comment about changing your playing stills is pretty accurate, considering you won't be able to get your acoustic to feel like your electric 100% and vice versa. How long have you had the strat? I'd give it some time before you start panicking, maybe a week or two of constant playing before your hands adjust to the different feel of an electric guitar.

I play with 13s on my Martin, and when you consider the higher action, it gives me much more fight than, lets say, a strat with 9s strung on it. After playing one for a long time, the other will feel foreign, but it's generally a phase and not something permanent.


I've had the strat since August. I like it, I just don't love it, like I love my taylor. Being left handed, I couldn't try a lot of instruments before I purchased this one. I've only, in my life, ever played a few american strats, a bunch of epiphone les pauls, a MIM tele, an LPJ, and a plethora of shitty strat copies. I guess I don't really know what I would like best, as far as electrics go
#19
You just make not enjoy the profile of a strat. Personally, I prefer wider necks with the scale length being 25.5"+ I can't get into the 24.75" guitars, they feel too distant for my tastes.

It may just be an issue of not being the right guitar for you, if that's the case, then modifying it won't help you much.

Edit: Massive LOL with the scale lengths, must have been smoking something great
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Last edited by megano28 at Mar 8, 2014,
#20
I'd been playing LPs *very heavily* for a couple of years. 24.75" scale.
I switched to a 25.5" Variax JTV-89F and assumed I really wouldn't have any issues. But there was just something about it that didn't feel right. Turns out it wasn't the scale at all. It was where the guitar placed the 12th fret compared to where my left arm was (I'm correct-handed). I have to reach across my body more to get to the upper frets than I did with the LP (or vice-versa - I don't remember). That was a product of how it sat on my leg when I was sitting *and* how it hung from a strap.

It has taken several months for me to build the muscle memory to make it a "no brainer" the way working with an LP was. I actually had to put the LPs aside and play ONLY that guitar for most of that time. Now I can go back and forth between the two and I'm okay; it's as if my body now has two sets of muscle memory presets that I can activate as necessary. But for a while there was really only one.

This may have something to do with your issue as well.
#21
Quote by dspellman
I'd been playing LPs *very heavily* for a couple of years. 24.75" scale.
I switched to a 25.5" Variax JTV-89F and assumed I really wouldn't have any issues. But there was just something about it that didn't feel right. Turns out it wasn't the scale at all. It was where the guitar placed the 12th fret compared to where my left arm was (I'm correct-handed). I have to reach across my body more to get to the upper frets than I did with the LP (or vice-versa - I don't remember). That was a product of how it sat on my leg when I was sitting *and* how it hung from a strap.

It has taken several months for me to build the muscle memory to make it a "no brainer" the way working with an LP was. I actually had to put the LPs aside and play ONLY that guitar for most of that time. Now I can go back and forth between the two and I'm okay; it's as if my body now has two sets of muscle memory presets that I can activate as necessary. But for a while there was really only one.

This may have something to do with your issue as well.


Hmm, that's interesting. When i had my epi LP standard, i noticed that it was a lot easier to play than my MIM fender tele. I traded it in partially to fund my MIA strat purchase, so i'm not sure if it's easier to play than my strat--but suspect I just may be a LP guy at least in terms of feel. I didn't like how heavy it was, and the epiphone sounded absolutely disgusting to my ears, but it definitely felt "easier" to play. It really sucks that I can't play more guitars. I wouldn't even know where to go to try out a real Gibson LP. I have no idea what type of neck I prefer because I've only played about 4 different types of electric guitars. I know there is an all-lefty guitar store in texas, but I'm on long island and can't exactly get down there anytime soon.