#1
Hi there,

I am looking for some direction towards some Blues solos or riffs that I can play when I go into the guitar store. It sounds funny, but here's the deal. I have been a guitarist for 15 years and most of that time I played acoustic rhythm guitar. In the past few years I've been struggling to teach myself lead guitar, and I know a couple pentatonic boxes, but I am really lost for the most part. Youtube is full of lesson videos, but it's not helpful like a real teacher would be, and I can't afford that. Anyways, I'm at the point where I cut put on a jam track and make stupid little solos with bends and such and I have a good time... but then I go into the guitar shop and I have no back track and I'm standing there with the guitar just going up and down a couple pentatonic boxes and it's not very impressive. It's embarassing, especially considering I've been a guitarist half my life, just not a lead guitarist!

Maybe you know a solo that works well and wouldn't be to hard to learn?

Maybe you know a good site that can help with my blues chops, or maybe you are a blues player who can help get me to think in the terms of the blues, in which case I can develop my own style instead of playing a riff by so and so.

Thanks!
#2
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lt2uFgJw4b8

seriously, though, there are a bunch of youtube tuition videos which have blues licks in them. just do a search for "basic blues licks" or something like that.

whole lotta love by led zep has a pretty good solo with fairly ubiquitous bluesy licks in it, if you want to learn something specific.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#4
Quote by Dave_Mc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lt2uFgJw4b8

seriously, though, there are a bunch of youtube tuition videos which have blues licks in them. just do a search for "basic blues licks" or something like that.

whole lotta love by led zep has a pretty good solo with fairly ubiquitous bluesy licks in it, if you want to learn something specific.


Ha, ha, ha, I love that clip from Wayne's World. Isn't there a sign in that music store that says "No Stairway to Heaven" ... LOL.

I would agree about Whole Lotta Love... I know the song well, and the rhythm riff is pretty classic by itself. The solo would be a good one to practice because it's a fairly standard pentatonic based solo that would match what I know! Thanks so much!
#5
Quote by FlySelf
This video maybe can help you.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWiS53MJO-Y


Thanks. I do need to practice the classic "pull off" speed cycle or whatever it's real name is. I can do it, but I can't do it as fast as serious lead players.

Here's the big question for those of you feeling good about your lead playing. Was it learning licks that helped, or was their a concept that was more theoretical that helped you do your own thing. I watched a great video on YouTube that explained that a basic concept is to use major pentatonic over the I chord and then use minor pentatonic on the IV and V chords. I found that helpful in terms of applying it to any key. The problem with licks is that you need to understand what they are doing musically to apply them to other keys unless it's a basic shape that can be slid and always comes off a certain note in the pentatonic. I am amazed that the great great blues guitarists developed all this without much knowledge of theory or anyone to listen to. I look at a guy like Freddie King, and I really like his signature style, and it's quite unique, but what helped me understand him a bit more was seeing a guitar teacher say that he often would do these overbends as part of his style. Knowing that made learning him a lot more helpful.

Cheers!
#6
Just be yourself and play what you play well. A novice blues player is not going to impress the jaded music store set with their hot blues licks, trust me. They have heard it all and see through that stuff pretty fast. An honest player is refreshing to jaded ears.

I am a very experienced blues player but just never comfortable putting on a show in a music store. I think it's usually obnoxious and it's not my style. I'll briefly check out the tone and feel of a guitar and if I really want to dig in, I'll ask to set up in a private room to wail a bit at volume without making a damn spectacle of myself. I'll save that for the stage.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Mar 3, 2014,
#7
Quote by Cajundaddy
Just be yourself and play what you play well. A novice blues player is not going to impress the jaded music store set with their hot blues licks, trust me. They have heard it all and see through that stuff pretty fast. An honest player is refreshing to jaded ears.

I am a very experienced blues player but just never comfortable putting on a show in a music store. I think it's usually obnoxious and it's not my style. I'll briefly check out the tone and feel of a guitar and if I really want to dig in, I'll ask to set up in a private room to wail a bit at volume without making a damn spectacle of myself. I'll save that for the stage.


You make a good point. I live in a small town so it's usually just me and the guitar tech in the store and he's a really awesome nice guy. He once complimented me on my fingerpicking technique when trying out an acoustic, so I must not be too bad in his books.

I really want to earn my blues chops now!!
#8
1) No one wants to hear an unaccompanied blues solo in the music store - no one...

2) If you want to play something impressive with some lead elements, learn a Jimi Hendrix Song like Bold as Love or something to that effect. Pick a tune that mixes lead and rhythm so that whatever you are playing is pleasing to listen to. Leads by themselves are the bane of the music store.

3) If you want earn your blues chops - you need to learn some actual solos by some great players.
#9
Quote by ryryrecords
Ha, ha, ha, I love that clip from Wayne's World. Isn't there a sign in that music store that says "No Stairway to Heaven" ... LOL.

I would agree about Whole Lotta Love... I know the song well, and the rhythm riff is pretty classic by itself. The solo would be a good one to practice because it's a fairly standard pentatonic based solo that would match what I know! Thanks so much!


yeah there's a no stairway sign too it's on youtube as well

and no problem

Quote by ryryrecords
Thanks. I do need to practice the classic "pull off" speed cycle or whatever it's real name is. I can do it, but I can't do it as fast as serious lead players.

Here's the big question for those of you feeling good about your lead playing. Was it learning licks that helped, or was their a concept that was more theoretical that helped you do your own thing. I watched a great video on YouTube that explained that a basic concept is to use major pentatonic over the I chord and then use minor pentatonic on the IV and V chords. I found that helpful in terms of applying it to any key. The problem with licks is that you need to understand what they are doing musically to apply them to other keys unless it's a basic shape that can be slid and always comes off a certain note in the pentatonic. I am amazed that the great great blues guitarists developed all this without much knowledge of theory or anyone to listen to. I look at a guy like Freddie King, and I really like his signature style, and it's quite unique, but what helped me understand him a bit more was seeing a guitar teacher say that he often would do these overbends as part of his style. Knowing that made learning him a lot more helpful.

Cheers!


I generally use licks, but listen to the way good players use them. if you just use random licks it'll sound bad (or at least if it sounds good it'll be random chance) but if you listen to how good players link those licks together that should give you some idea as to how to make it sound good.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#10
Quote by reverb66
1) No one wants to hear an unaccompanied blues solo in the music store - no one...

2) If you want to play something impressive with some lead elements, learn a Jimi Hendrix Song like Bold as Love or something to that effect. Pick a tune that mixes lead and rhythm so that whatever you are playing is pleasing to listen to. Leads by themselves are the bane of the music store.

3) If you want earn your blues chops - you need to learn some actual solos by some great players.



Duly noted!

Mind giving me a list of 5 blues solos that you found helpful to learn?
#11
Quote by Dave_Mc
yeah there's a no stairway sign too it's on youtube as well

and no problem


I generally use licks, but listen to the way good players use them. if you just use random licks it'll sound bad (or at least if it sounds good it'll be random chance) but if you listen to how good players link those licks together that should give you some idea as to how to make it sound good.


Funny you should mention licks. I think that might a good approach along with studying a particular artists full solos. I remember that Justinguitar (who did a bunch on Youtube) did a lesson series of like 5 licks from the pentatonic. I have managed to remember one of them and use it at least once every time I am playing with a backing track.

It's that one that goes 7-9 (on g string) 8 8 (on b and e) and resolves to 10 on the b.... wow that's the worst tab I've seen in my life and I made it ha ha ha
Last edited by ryryrecords at Mar 4, 2014,
#12
Quote by ryryrecords
Duly noted!

Mind giving me a list of 5 blues solos that you found helpful to learn?


I'm terrible at giving recommendations because my musical development was pretty unorthodox, but here are some ideas :

1) Anything by Albert King - 60's recordings. Born Under a Bad Sign would be a good one. With Albert, it's all about the bends and articulation - he doesn't play fast runs.

2) SRV - Mary Had a Little Lamb ( probably the most accessible solo of his). Lenny - has nearly every blues technique in that solo - plus it's a great tune! Empty Arms is his best shuffle tune with an amazing solo.

3) BB King Thrill is gone ( original 60's studio recording) - it's all feel - good for learning soft phrasing.

4) Red House - Jimi Hendrix - this will be a major challenge, but it will open up your playing quite a bit.
#13
Quote by reverb66
I'm terrible at giving recommendations because my musical development was pretty unorthodox, but here are some ideas :

1) Anything by Albert King - 60's recordings. Born Under a Bad Sign would be a good one. With Albert, it's all about the bends and articulation - he doesn't play fast runs.

2) SRV - Mary Had a Little Lamb ( probably the most accessible solo of his). Lenny - has nearly every blues technique in that solo - plus it's a great tune! Empty Arms is his best shuffle tune with an amazing solo.

3) BB King Thrill is gone ( original 60's studio recording) - it's all feel - good for learning soft phrasing.

4) Red House - Jimi Hendrix - this will be a major challenge, but it will open up your playing quite a bit.


I like your suggestions! Thank you for them. And yes, I agree, I'll leave Jimi's song until last... I watched a 13 minute live version of it and man oh man... it's hard to learn from Jimi because he's left handed too.

I really love Albert King, and B.B. King is very expressive. I need more exposure to SRV but there's gotta be reason he's cited as a lot of people's favourite!
#14
SRv - check out the Texas Flood album and Live at the El Mocambo concert ( you tube has it, it's the best SRV video footage by far).