#1
I just bought a new washburn WD7 harvest series guitar a little over a week ago and today I noticed the G-string is buzzing badly only when played on the 3rd fret. There is no buzzing on any other string or any other fret, just that one note. Does this mean there is a tiny high spot on the 4th fret that the g-string is buzzing against? I can't see anything out of the ordinary with a visual inspection. What to do?
#2
Well yes, it means the 4th fret is likely a twitch high.

Three paths lead to could lead to remediation. The neck may not have sufficient "relief". This is cured by loosening the truss rod a tiny bit, allowing the dip in the neck to increas a tiny bit. (Usually not any more than a quarter turn adjustment, is enough to cure either too much, or too little relief).

The bridge saddle's radius is oftentimes not as severe as the radius of the fingerboard. In this case, either raising the action, or fabricating a new saddle will cure it.

The last resort is filing the fret(s). Keep in mind the fret filing can lead to "tail chasing". Since if you file the 4th fret, the 5th fret can become low h respect to it, and now the 5th fret is buzzing. And "yadda, yadda, yadda", that can continue on all the way up the neck.

Another solution may be, "seating the fret". It may have backed up a bit, whether from low humidity, or other factors.

With the strings off, you would take a hardwood block, place it over the affected area, and try tapping the fret down, very, very, very, gently, with a hobby type hammer. (4 to 8 ounces MAX, absolutely no more.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 2, 2014,
#3
Quote by rohash
I just bought a new washburn WD7 harvest series guitar a little over a week ago and today I noticed the G-string is buzzing badly only when played on the 3rd fret. There is no buzzing on any other string or any other fret, just that one note. Does this mean there is a tiny high spot on the 4th fret that the g-string is buzzing against? I can't see anything out of the ordinary with a visual inspection. What to do?


I'm having a similar problem with my Yamaha F-310, except with my E-strings. the low E, the really thick string, is buzzing on the 3rd fret. The high E is buzzing on the 1st fret. did Captaincranky's solution work for you? I just don't want to go and tamper with my guitar only to find out that its not gonna work.
#4
Quote by mtmccarl
I'm having a similar problem with my Yamaha F-310, except with my E-strings. the low E, the really thick string, is buzzing on the 3rd fret. The high E is buzzing on the 1st fret. did Captaincranky's solution work for you? I just don't want to go and tamper with my guitar only to find out that its not gonna work.
With the symptom you're describing, another possibility exists. The the top nut groove could be too deep. That would place the e-1 string in close proximity to the first fret.

The fret being high could also still be a problem. But, the issues of neck relief and saddle curvature become less likely suspects.

For your E-6, (the thick guy), my other causes could still be in play.

I link Mr Becker's setup guide for everybody with these questions. If you read and understand it, you will have a great overview of all the issues affecting setup.

For some of the operations, you need to have a set of "feeler gauges", the same as are used in the machinist's and auto repair trades.

http://thbecker.net/guitar_playing/guitars_and_setup/setup_page_01.html

A simple measurement of the e-1 between the bottom of the string, and the top of the 1st fret, will either confirm or rule out my diagnosis. (Obviously, you would have to compare your measurement with Mr. Becker's suggestions).
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 23, 2014,