#1
..it's an Ashton AGL85LTD.

Everyone looks down upon Ashton, just because "lulz, Ashton", but it actually sounds great and looks great.

I called Ashton up to find out how limited it was, if it's not that rare, why put LTD at the end of the name, right?

The dude told me there's only 50 around at the moment and a small amount more being made this year.

If my guitar is this rare, is it wise for me to just leave it as, completely stock, and just pack it away somewhere and maybe one day, if Ashton shuts up shop, it'll be worth a bit more?

Because I'm thinking of using it as my workhorse, and was wanting to upgrade the pickups (it sounds a little too bluesy to me, I want more of a rock tone from them) and get new strings, etc etc..

Will I be doing myself a disservice by messing with it at all? Or would you assume that because it's an Ashton, it won't actually go up in value at any point in time.
#2
Guitars are meant to be played, that's why you bought it right? The most expensive guitars in the world are expensive because of its history, less of its limited numbers.

Unless you have one of the 1700 Gibson LP made between 1957-1959 (i think).
#3
Yeah, exactly, and I do want to and plan on playing it.

I just don't want to find out later on down the track that I've totally destroyed and made worthless a guitar that might wind up being kinda special to some people.
I can't help but feel stupid saying that, because it IS an Ashton - they're not exactly some highly sought after brand.. but still, I'd hate for them to shut up shop, suddenly this super rare model gets wanted by more people/collectors, and I've totally screwed mine over by messing with and destroying it's value.

I personally do want to use it. It's a great guitar, way, way better than I was expecting it to be, my only problem is it feels weird but that's probably due to me playing only acoustic guitars for about the last 4 years.
It sounds absolutely fantastic but I do want to get some more rockier pickups, I don't play blues and the sound is basically a 100% big, warm, full bodied blues sound.

So I'm going to want to change that so I can play it, and potentially destroy something that could be sought after later on down the track. :/
Then again, it is MY guitar, right here right now, not some other dudes from 50 years in the future.
#4
pickups can be removed and replaced later.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#5
Quote by jj1565
pickups can be removed and replaced later.


..and all is well, guitar is restored 100% to how it was before?
#6
value increases if demand outstrips supply. I wouldn't count on that happening with that guitar. if you enjoy it that is what counts. unless Slash (or another guitar hero type) starts using them I wouldn't count on it being worth huge money.
#7
Quote by King Turi
..and all is well, guitar is restored 100% to how it was before?



yes, it should unless you start stripping screws, or scratching the finish.
Jenneh

Quote by TNfootballfan62
Jenny needs to sow her wild oats with random Gibsons and Taylors she picks up in bars before she settles down with a PRS.


Set up Questions? ...Q & A Thread

Recognised by the Official EG/GG&A/GB&C WTLT Lists 2011
#8
Just because something is rare, does not make it valuable. Besides, messing around with yours will make the other 49 more valuable.
#9
A run of 50 isn’t special. Guitar makers do small runs of niche models all the time. Big runs only happen if Guitar Center or Sam Ash place a large order.
#10
^Exactly. Artificial scarcity is common in the guitar world. 50-guitar runs happen all the time, which of course means that "1 of 50" isn't necessarily an indicator of anything meaningful.

Plus, looking at eBay prices, that's a $300 ish guitar. It's very unlikely that something in that price range will become a collector's item, and even if it does, are you really willing to pay more money now to buy another guitar so that in 20 years you can maybe make a few hundred bucks on it? If this were a $10K PRS one-off, I can appreciate why you might do it (still silly, I think) but certainly not on this guitar.

Quote by King Turi
I just don't want to find out later on down the track that I've totally destroyed and made worthless a guitar that might wind up being kinda special to some people.

Screw other people. Make the guitar special to you. Personalize it and play it and get the joy out of it that you deserve. Don't mortgage your own experience for the unrealistic scenario where it's worth a little bit more in 30 years.
#11
Quote by King Turi
..it's an Ashton AGL85LTD.

Will I be doing myself a disservice by messing with it at all? Or would you assume that because it's an Ashton, it won't actually go up in value at any point in time.


There are a LOT of "rare" guitars. Some are rare because no one really wanted them. Some are rare because they're one-offs (every Carvin, for example, is a semi-custom). In the case of an Ashton, you have a small importer importing small quantities of inexpensive guitars. Honestly, they may be rare, but desirability down the line is nearly impossible to gauge. I wouldnt count on them ever going up in value.

As a relatively inexpensive guitar, it will make a great modification platform.
#14
As above. At the end of the day, you bought a guitar to play it, so play it. Keep it in good nick as I'm sure you would do with all of your axes and give it some TLC every so often.

On a personal note, I prefer guitars that sound big and bluesy, and I don't play blues at all. Rock through a blues guitar sounds better in my personal experience.

But at the end of the day, it's your kit, do with it what you will. Just have a play around with your EQ and effects first, you may be pleasantly surprised.
Quote by Rocker007
Blackrat has won this thread. That is an awsome post.


This was posted right after I posted said post in a completely different thread... Whups.


"There are 3 types of people in this world... Those who can count, and those who can't."
#15
Thanks for all the comments, it's helped me out loads.
Didn't realise runs of 50 guitars wasn't as rare as I thought.

I'm going to do what I want with it, but still keep any original parts just for the heck of it.

Again, cheers.
#17
Quote by Roc8995


Plus, looking at eBay prices, that's a $300 ish guitar.


I can't find any on ebay. Couldn't when I bought it either.

To be honest, I can't find a damn thing about the guitar anywhere online except for on Ashtons own site, which doesn't have much info on it.
#19
Agree if any mods, make them reversible. And have you tried it with a different amp? That can make worlds of differences. When I look at what Danelectros, all those 60's Japanese pieces of crap that were sold at department stores (I know, I was there and saw them) and what they are selling for now, I shake my head. Should be a buyer's market in year or two for all those trendy ukes too, come to think of it. Value and price often bear little relationship.
#20
Supply and demand the only thing that makes something rare is a bigger demand than supply.
song stuck in my head today