#1
Over the last few months I've been trying to improve my picking to try and get it on the same level as my legato.

I've noticed that if I focus on every single pick stroke, try and get each pick as clean as a possible and try stop the pick leaving the string too far, then I can't pick as fast as I would like. But if I just 'let' my hand go and stop focusing so much on each stroke I can pick through fast runs.

I know it seems very ambiguous, it's hard to explain, but I was wondering is this the right approach to fast picking? Does it come to a point for you where you stop focusing so much on your picking and it all just takes care of itself?

(Note, fast picking for me would be something along the lines of sixteenth notes at 100-120bpm)
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#2
Fast picking comes from relation and small movements. The smaller your movements and the more relaxed your pick strokes, the faster you will play.

It sounds like you are tensing up in order to play with smaller movements, so when you just start playing you don't tense up as much and are able to play faster.

If you have to tense up to have smaller picking movements, then you should slow down; this should make it easier to make smaller movements with relaxation.
#3
^ yeah. it's kind of counterintuitive, but the harder you try at fast picking the harder it gets.
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#4
Yeah, if I try to consiously make smaller movements my hands go out of sync and it all turns horribly sloppy Funnily enough I feel that if I make bigger pick movements when practising, my hands are more in sync

But what I was wondering is if smaller movements is something that happens naturally as you begin to play faster? Is it worth consiously trying to make small pick movements or do you naturally make smaller movements as you pick at high tempos?
Gear:
Epiphone Les Paul Standard
Godin Velocity
Peavey Vypyr 15 Watt
AMT WH1 Japanese Girl Wah
Marshall BB-2 Boost/OD
Joyo JF-07 Classic Flanger
Joyo JF-37 Analog Chorus
#5
I'm not sure I ever really consciously tried to do it. Then again I'm not the fastest player in the world (but I think I'm reasonably quick and my movements are fairly small and fairly efficient).
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#6
Quote by BlueIceBox
Yeah, if I try to consiously make smaller movements my hands go out of sync and it all turns horribly sloppy Funnily enough I feel that if I make bigger pick movements when practising, my hands are more in sync


This will go away with practice, if you're having problems slow down further. I was playing at 20bpm practicing picking for a long time (and still go that low sometimes if I want to program more efficient movements), it's a very good way to get better technique ingrained in your brain.

But what I was wondering is if smaller movements is something that happens naturally as you begin to play faster? Is it worth consiously trying to make small pick movements or do you naturally make smaller movements as you pick at high tempos?


It is absolutely worth it. You will not be able to play past a certain speed without a certain amount of picking efficiency (smaller movements = more efficient), so if you don't practice making smaller pick movements you won't get faster past a certain point (for almost everyone this seems to be around 120bpm 16ths, and I honestly have no idea why this specific number is such a common speed to get stuck at with picking).

While you're actually playing a song (as opposed to practicing it), the idea is that the motions will be so deeply ingrained in your brain that you will naturally play with smaller and more relaxed pick movements. I don't actively think "I need to make small pick movements" as I play through a song, but when practicing the song I will make sure my pick movements (and fret movements for that matter) are as small as possible.
#7
If you ask me I would say that I can do "fast picking" or anything else that I think is difficult a lot better when i'm not stressing and focusing to hard on it like you mentioned.

For me the biggest thing is to have fun and have a positive mind. Don't be thinking "damn I can't get this fast enough" and then focus really hard on making it faster while keeping it clean. As far as I've found brains don't work like that. You just gotta go on autotpilot let your practice time you've put in pay for itself have a positive mind and keep in mind how far you've come and how much you have improved.

With that kinda mindset you will find how fast you can really go. Although you could possibly not even notice it. #Being in the ****ing zone.
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#8
If possible, try to record yourself.
My guitar teacher started out self-taught and the only thing he did was record himself and adjust his playing.
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