#1
that instead of only being able to choose between the key of C and "random", you can practice in any key?

In Functional Ear Trainer you choose either the major or minor scale. The program will play a I IV V or a i iv v, then play a note that you guess the cadence of. You can choose to include any number of the 12 cadences in the practice.

But the program gives no good way of practicing in any key besides C. When you choose random you can't replay the chord progression whenever you want without making it change key on the next question. It doesn't give the mind time to adjust to each new key.

My brain is stuck in the key of C and I need to be able to focus on other keys. It seems like the most obvious feature an ear trainer should have; pick a key, then guess the cadences of all 12 or some of the cadences as they're played to you, while at the same time being able to replay a progression to establish the root and whether it's minor or major. But I cannot find a program that offers this.
I once hit a man in Dearborn. Michigan. A hit and run. I hit him and just kept on goin. I don't know if he's alive or dead. But I'm sorry. Not a day goes by i don't see his face.
#2
Quote by rabbittroopsux
that instead of only being able to choose between the key of C and "random", you can practice in any key?

In Functional Ear Trainer you choose either the major or minor scale. The program will play a I IV V or a i iv v, then play a note that you guess the cadence of. You can choose to include any number of the 12 cadences in the practice.

But the program gives no good way of practicing in any key besides C. When you choose random you can't replay the chord progression whenever you want without making it change key on the next question. It doesn't give the mind time to adjust to each new key.

My brain is stuck in the key of C and I need to be able to focus on other keys. It seems like the most obvious feature an ear trainer should have; pick a key, then guess the cadences of all 12 or some of the cadences as they're played to you, while at the same time being able to replay a progression to establish the root and whether it's minor or major. But I cannot find a program that offers this.


... Please stop using the word "cadence", you obviously don't know what it means.
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#3
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
... Please stop using the word "cadence", you obviously don't know what it means.


Aren't you a respected poster? How about making an attempt at being helpful? If I used a word wrong, why no clear up my mistake and help me understand, instead of being a useless smart ass?

What I was trying to refer to was the specific quality that a note has. Like how all major 7ths will have the same quality in any major scale, whether it's B in the key of C, or F# in the key of G. How all minor 3rds have the same quality in any minor scale, whether it's a C in the key of A minor, or G in the key of E minor. I was just referring to that quality. How resolved, how consonant/dissonant, how much pull a note has towards the root, etc.

If cadence doesn't refer to that, my mistake. Whether the program asks to identify the note played as an interval, or by the note itself doesn't make a difference.
I once hit a man in Dearborn. Michigan. A hit and run. I hit him and just kept on goin. I don't know if he's alive or dead. But I'm sorry. Not a day goes by i don't see his face.
#4
Quote by rabbittroopsux
Aren't you a respected poster? How about making an attempt at being helpful? If I used a word wrong, why no clear up my mistake and help me understand, instead of being a useless smart ass?

What I was trying to refer to was the specific quality that a note has. Like how all major 7ths will have the same quality in any major scale, whether it's B in the key of C, or F# in the key of G. How all minor 3rds have the same quality in any minor scale, whether it's a C in the key of A minor, or G in the key of E minor. I was just referring to that quality. How resolved, how consonant/dissonant, how much pull a note has towards the root, etc.

If cadence doesn't refer to that, my mistake. Whether the program asks to identify the note played as an interval, or by the note itself doesn't make a difference.


Knowing you are wrong is extremely useful, you can't correct yourself if you don't know you're wrong and that's what I encourage you to do; you have the limitless resources of the internet and instead of going and finding out you choose to write a paragraph about how useless I am. Go look it up; it's a pretty simple word really.

The word you're looking for is just "interval". You are looking for interval recognition. Which I can't even begin to help you with.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.
#5
Quote by rabbittroopsux
that instead of only being able to choose between the key of C and "random", you can practice in any key?

In Functional Ear Trainer you choose either the major or minor scale. The program will play a I IV V or a i iv v, then play a note that you guess the cadence of. You can choose to include any number of the 12 cadences in the practice.

But the program gives no good way of practicing in any key besides C. When you choose random you can't replay the chord progression whenever you want without making it change key on the next question. It doesn't give the mind time to adjust to each new key.

My brain is stuck in the key of C and I need to be able to focus on other keys. It seems like the most obvious feature an ear trainer should have; pick a key, then guess the cadences of all 12 or some of the cadences as they're played to you, while at the same time being able to replay a progression to establish the root and whether it's minor or major. But I cannot find a program that offers this.


Functional ear trainer from miles.be does offer the option to play randomly in another key. You want to be able to hear ANY interval in any key. All the keys are relative, so each one sounds the same, relatively speaking. You don't want to get in the habit of just memorizing the intervals for only one key, but that is a good starting place. It takes a lot of work.

To become a great guitar player, one needs to work on autodidactic and inductive reasoning skills. That is a good question and you are on the right track.
Last edited by sweetdude3000 at Mar 5, 2014,
#6
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Knowing you are wrong is extremely useful, you can't correct yourself if you don't know you're wrong and that's what I encourage you to do; you have the limitless resources of the internet and instead of going and finding out you choose to write a paragraph about how useless I am. Go look it up; it's a pretty simple word really.

The word you're looking for is just "interval". You are looking for interval recognition. Which I can't even begin to help you with.


Fair enough. I just felt your remark was unwelcoming at best. And for a long time I've considered your posts to be informative and represent the best of the site.


Quote by sweetdude3000
Functional ear trainer from miles.be does offer the option to play randomly in another key. You want to be able to hear ANY interval in any key. All the keys are relative, so each one sounds the same, relatively speaking. You don't want to get in the habit of just memorizing the intervals for only one key, but that is a good starting place. It takes a lot of work.

To become a great guitar player, one needs to work on autodidactic and inductive reasoning skills. That is a good question and you are on the right track.



I know. For some reason when it switches to a different key, even though I hear the new I IV V, my brain doesn't switch to it. I'll hear a note played and I still hear it relative to a previous key. I think I even imagine music in C . I thought focusing on a single, random keys during ear training for longer periods would be a good stepping stone.

I sometimes do get in a groove where I can do it when it changes keys every question, but usually just hearing the I IV V doesn't make me switch over.
I once hit a man in Dearborn. Michigan. A hit and run. I hit him and just kept on goin. I don't know if he's alive or dead. But I'm sorry. Not a day goes by i don't see his face.
Last edited by rabbittroopsux at Mar 6, 2014,
#7
Quote by rabbittroopsux
And for a long time I've considered your posts to be informative and represent the best of the site.


You probably haven't been paying enough attention then. Either that or you brushed over it because it wasn't pointed at you.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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#8
Im currently learning and trying to memorise the sounds of all the intervals using Troy Stetinas Fretboard Mastery and Improvising Music Theory (practiciing the physical shapes and singing them too).

My question though is how helpful is learning the intervals? I still struggle a fair bit with learning by ear which is one of my big goals on guitar.

Is there anything else I can do to make it easier to learn songs and solos by ear?

I do have a slow downer and Im mainly trying to learn some Guns n Roses and ACDC type rock.
#9
Quote by LTaces
My question though is how helpful is learning the intervals? I still struggle a fair bit with learning by ear which is one of my big goals on guitar.


Being able to tell what an interval is against a certain root is endlessly useful both in transcription and writing. If you can hear a note and know that it's a certain distance away from the root of the chord in the background then you know what that note is and can add that to your transcription, same goes with writing; you think of a sound in your head and if you can identify the interval then you can transfer it to the guitar.

It also helps with the next note, if you know what a note is and you know the next one is a certain interval away then you know what note it is.

Knowing the names isn't needed to be able to do this but I think generally putting a name on something helps you remember it and it also means you can communicate this information to other people with absolute clarity.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


Album.
Legion.