#1
Okay Im normally a rock/metal guitarist , but as part of school I have had to join the jazz band and play guitar for them. I'm just about fine with the chords (there are some weird ones) but where I struggle is reading sheet music to play on my guitar.I can read the music just is there a good way to learn where all the notes on the guitar is. My main thing is how do you know which note to play, because there are lots of notes that are the exact same pitch, just with a slight change of tone on the string.

Basically how do you know which note so I can sight read faster and good ways to learn to read and play sheet music

Thanks
#2
that's up to you as the performer (unless explicitly dictated by the sheet music). read it in positions that correspond to the differences in tone, and use the ones you prefer.
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#3
Notation doesn't usually tell you on which string to play the note. But that's up to you. You can play the same C note in two positions: 8th fret of E string and 3rd fret of A string. It sounds the same (yeah, it sounds slightly different but not that different that it would change how your melodic line sounds like - I mean, you can change your tone also by turning your tone knob(s) or swithcing the pickup position and that doesn't usually read on the notation either). And you won't sound the same as on the record, even if you were using exactly the same fingerings and same equipment. So it doesn't matter which position you use. It sounds the same.
Quote by AlanHB
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#4
Quote by EpicGuitarGuy13
Okay Im normally a rock/metal guitarist , but as part of school I have had to join the jazz band and play guitar for them. I'm just about fine with the chords (there are some weird ones) but where I struggle is reading sheet music to play on my guitar.I can read the music just is there a good way to learn where all the notes on the guitar is. My main thing is how do you know which note to play, because there are lots of notes that are the exact same pitch, just with a slight change of tone on the string.

Basically how do you know which note so I can sight read faster and good ways to learn to read and play sheet music

Thanks


The first course to our online Guitar School is learning the notes on the neck. it is a flat rate course, which means one price for the whole series of lectures, and the outcome is you can find or name any note on the fretboard in 1 second or less. I've had people finish the course and have that functional outcome in 2 weeks or less. The link to my website is in my sig below.

What you are referring to in your situation are unisons, where a D can be 10th fret 6th string, 5th fret 5th or open 4th, for example. Same pitch. In my opinion since you have these possibilities, its very useful to know where all of these are. For example, if the area of the neck was 3rd position, you might easily deem the D at the 5th fret or open 4th strings, more so than jumping to the 10th fret, because of proximity. So the context of the position you are playing in can help you decide, which D will be the easiest to reach, which once more, a solid 1 second or less command of the notes on the neck, would be invaluable towards.

There's a great music reading book that we've recommended for years, called Music Reading for Guitar, by David Oakes. Phenomenal book. Its with MI Press and he has a wonderful approach to learning sight reading and assists with position play, rhythm understanding and, is the best book ever written on the subject, in my opinion.

Some years ago I published some highly rated lessons on some basics of staff note reading that I've linked below:

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/throw_the_boy_down_the_well.html

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/for_beginners/throw_the_boy_down_the_well_part_2.html

Hope this information helps. If we can be of further assistance, let me know! Just PM me or send me an email via the site.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 4, 2014,
#6
Well, how do violinists or cellists know where to play notes? (There's notes on violin and cello that repeat in the same manner as notes on guitar do. There's just less note possibilities total, because both those instruments have less strings.) A violinist or cellist doesn't go, "Where should I play this on the neck? What string, what fret? (Note: They obviously don't have frets.) What positions?" Etc. No, instead they go, "I know where those notes are on my violin/cello. Where would it be easiest to play those?" My point is, get out of the mindset of guitar tabs, which tell you EVERYTHING basically, and get into the mindset of deciding where it would be easiest on the fretboard to play certain notes and so on. Make sense?
#7
Yeah thanks, I just need to work on memorising the whole fret board. I can do the E and A string in my sleep , D just about but that's cus I half tranpose from the E , but the B string and the G are just plain difficult to remember
#8
Quote by EpicGuitarGuy13
Yeah thanks, I just need to work on memorising the whole fret board. I can do the E and A string in my sleep , D just about but that's cus I half tranpose from the E , but the B string and the G are just plain difficult to remember


Sounds like you have more awareness on possible directions and options now, than when you started! Best of luck to you. Now you just have to go out and do it!

Best,

Sean
#9
Quote by EpicGuitarGuy13
Yeah thanks, I just need to work on memorising the whole fret board. I can do the E and A string in my sleep , D just about but that's cus I half tranpose from the E , but the B string and the G are just plain difficult to remember

This UG Article may help with that. The thing I like about it (and why I recommend it so much) is that it presents several different ways to memorize the fretboard, and all of them are fairly easy to understand.
#10
I've now got that book suggested and it is very helpful, I understand why you recommended it - extremely helpful. Thanks