#1
My sir has instructed me to place the last three fingers of my picking hand at the bottom of the six strings at all times, below the sound hole. This helps me pick between the strings and has become a part of my guitar playing for the past 4 months (I can't change). I hold the pick between my index and the thumb, the index pointing down but my thumb diagonal, which gives me a good grip over the pick. My wrist is hanging down below the neck and when I try to press the first four frets of the guitar neck I feel a sharp pain along my wrist that feels like it's going to give me injury. I have solved this problem by pointing the headstock upwards. Now I can press the first four frets of the 6th string (low E) together without any pain. My sir has told me to keep my thumb at the top of my neck but I can't stretch enough and my thumb keeps changing it's position. So when I am pressing the first four frets of the 6th string my thumb is halfway down the neck (breadth-wise) but it comes up while playing the thinner strings. My instructor has a different teaching method, he will teach me scales and picking only for about a year and chords come later, rather than beginning with chords as most other teachers do. He wants me to be thoroughly good at picking before I start chords. Is this fine? Please tell me if I am headed in the right direction.
Last edited by XtrMetal at Mar 4, 2014,
#2
the person teaching you is teaching you wrong. period.

First off, anything physically hurting you will not work for you and you should stop IMMEDIATELY.

Second, your three fingers should not be holding onto the sixth string. That's known as a form of anchoring and (seeing as you can't stop) It's already heavily influenced your technique. That's not to say anchoring is ALWAYS bad, but it can lead to a lot of challenges down the road and generally **** with proper technique (it's not proper in itself)

And third, Your thumb should be gently rested against the back of the guitar neck, not wrapped around it. You should be able to play comfortably, relaxed, cleanly and with no pain at all.

All 4 of those WILL take time. I'd focus on learning proper technique first and possibly look into a new teacher. He sounds.... off. Not only for his technique advice, but scales and picking for a year straight? Why even?

No offence.
ayy lmao
Last edited by chookiecookie at Mar 4, 2014,
#3
Thanks for the help! BTW my three fingers are not touching any strings. They're way beneath the 1st string (I mean the thinnest one) and yes I know it's anchorage. There will be a different technique for strumming. Within these four months sir has already taught me scales and is teaching me songs that have only picking in it (actually he slightly modifies the song). Right now I have learnt The Pink Panther, The Final Countdown and He's A Pirate plus my national anthem and another song that's popular in my country. He makes me practice scales like D scale and E scale over the week while during his class he keeps teaching me new songs. These songs mostly include picking, with a bit of sliding/hammering. However he taught me Smoke On The Water with power chords. I also find it easy to learn beginner riffs using tabs like Hedwig's theme, Beat It intro, Iron Man by Black Sabbath and a higher version of the Final Countdown. I think he will start teaching me chords when I am comfortable with all the scales and have learnt a large number of songs. I think one year is required for thee slower students and I have a friend who has been learning under this teacher for almost 3 years and he's pretty good with chords.
Last edited by XtrMetal at Mar 4, 2014,
#4
Your teacher is clueless I'm afraid. He should have started you off with chords.

Nobody with any clue throws scales at a beginner.
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#5
Anchoring isn't necessarily bad. It can actually help you play fast, e.g. Michael Angelo Batio anchors with three fingers like you described. That being said, I don't think it's good for a beginner to "force it". I'd recommend anchoring with only your pinky.

You should definitely focus on your strumming technique. Learn the basic chords and practice strumming so that you can play chords on different strings without hitting the wrong strings. Also practice different rhythms, aka. strumming patterns.
Last edited by ChasenPipo at Mar 4, 2014,
#6
Quote by ChasenPipo
Anchoring isn't necessarily bad. It can actually help you play fast, e.g. Michael Angelo Batio anchors with three fingers like you described. That being said, I don't think it's good for a beginner to "force it". I'd recommend anchoring with only your pinky.

You should definitely focus on your strumming technique. Learn the basic chords and practice strumming so that you can play chords on different strings without hitting the wrong strings. Also practice different rhythms, aka. strumming patterns.

Agree on anchoring is not a bad thing at all.
People have different hands and such so different technique may apply to different person.
My guitar teacher actually teach me how to anchor. His playing is what I would call "Extreme Anchoring Picking Hand". (Middle, ring and pinky grab around the high E / bridge pickup, depending the situation)
And he can play almost anything clean and accurate.
He explained to me that with this kind of anchoring actually help with the muting on the picking hand.
Do you feel like I do!?
#7
Quote by EddieHet
People have different hands and such so different technique may apply to different person.


Actually... know. Barring disability or some kind of genetic/birth defect, most people have hands that are physiologically the same. Exact dimensions may be slightly different but that's really quite inconsequential.

Quote by EddieHet
He explained to me that with this kind of anchoring actually help with the muting on the picking hand.


Again, pretty much untrue; there's nothing about anchoring that makes muting better since you can do all the muting you need without even touching the body of the guitar, let alone fully anchoring.

Quote by EddieHet
And he can play almost anything clean and accurate.


So? That doesn't mean anchoring is good, that just means he's practiced long and hard enough to overcome it.


Now, before anyone says anything: anchoring, in terms of bad habits in and of itself, is not a deal-breaker... but it is a bad habit and can very easily lead to others, mainly in the form of tension as your picking hand has to work against the fixed point in order to be able to move the way it needs to.

If you're careful it's not a big thing but if you want to be a truly great picker it's something you're probably going to end up wanting to fix.
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#8
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Actually... know. Barring disability or some kind of genetic/birth defect, most people have hands that are physiologically the same. Exact dimensions may be slightly different but that's really quite inconsequential.


Again, pretty much untrue; there's nothing about anchoring that makes muting better since you can do all the muting you need without even touching the body of the guitar, let alone fully anchoring.


So? That doesn't mean anchoring is good, that just means he's practiced long and hard enough to overcome it.


Now, before anyone says anything: anchoring, in terms of bad habits in and of itself, is not a deal-breaker... but it is a bad habit and can very easily lead to others, mainly in the form of tension as your picking hand has to work against the fixed point in order to be able to move the way it needs to.

If you're careful it's not a big thing but if you want to be a truly great picker it's something you're probably going to end up wanting to fix.

Sorry for my bad English to make you misunderstand my point.

What I am trying to say there is I don't really see "Anchoring" is a bad habit.
Especially when talking about some form of tension.
Or am I totally misunderstood what is anchoring?
Do you feel like I do!?
Last edited by EddieHet at Mar 6, 2014,
#9
Quote by EddieHet
Sorry for my bad English to make you misunderstand my point.

What I am trying to say there is I don't really see "Anchoring" is a bad habit.
Especially when talking about some form of tension.
Or am I totally misunderstood what is anchoring?


Anchoring is defined here as having part of your hand fixed to a point on the guitar. It is a bad habit although how bad depends on what it causes the rest of your body to do. If it's causing you tension then it's definitely bad and something that should be stopped but that's not necessarily always going to be the case; some people do manage to anchor and have extremely relaxed picking.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

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“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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#10
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Anchoring is defined here as having part of your hand fixed to a point on the guitar. It is a bad habit although how bad depends on what it causes the rest of your body to do. If it's causing you tension then it's definitely bad and something that should be stopped but that's not necessarily always going to be the case; some people do manage to anchor and have extremely relaxed picking.

Thank you for clearing things out.
Sometimes I play I feel like I can fix my hand to a point on the guitar, but that point is quite a large area. (Mainly between the high e and "bottom side" of the bridge pickup)
And ofcoz there is no tension on my hand too.
Do you feel like I do!?