#1
Lets say I can play 3-5 songs ,when I play them certain parts sound a boy sloppy etc but....

If I was to stop practicing these songs for lets say a month and put the majority of my time practicing different techniques that cover all spectrums ,bends ,finger independence ,speed , endurance etc ...

When I come back to my songs would I see a huge improvement ?
#2
This is not a simple yes or no question. Although the simplest answer is that practice the songs properly (making sure you are playing them perfectly at a lower tempo, never playing sloppy), will be the best way to help you conquer those songs.

Practicing techniques can almost always be done via a song you are learning, and it's preferable since then you are learning actual music at the same time. Exercises are good when you have a very specific problem that you are trying to fix. "I suck at alternate picking" is not a specific problem, it's an overall problem. "When i play this lick i move my fingers way too much" or "i have problem transitioning between chord x and y" are specific problems.

It's also worth mentioning that endurance and speed that you mentioned are not techniques, they are byproducts of good technique.

My answer is to practice the songs, and make sure that you never play sloppy. If this means lowering the tempo to 40bpm, so be it. Almost all of the time you can conquer sloppiness by slowing down and getting it right at a low tempo, rather than ingraining bad technique at a higher tempo. If you however have a specific problem with the song, turn that into an exercise. Myself i have recently noticed that i have the specific problem that when i go from a picking phrase into a legato phrase, i have a tendency to rush the legato phrase. So i am actively focusing on that particular thing, not on legato or picking as a whole.

Hope that helped answer your question.

Best Regards
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

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#3
Quote by Sickz
This is not a simple yes or no question.


+1

The big problem with exercises/drills is that if you aren't careful they just make you good at doing exercises/drills.

The big problem with trying to eliminate your weaknesses by playing songs is that (depending on what the problem is) most songs will only have the specific thing you're having trouble with occasionally. I.e. a 5 minute song might have one bar/measure you're having trouble with and practising the whole song when it's just that one bar/measure which is the problem isn't exactly the most efficient way to work on your weaknesses. Of course you could always practise the one bar/measure you're having difficulty with separately, which is maybe the best of both worlds.

You kind of have to play it by ear, try both ways (or a combination) and see what helps.
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#4
Quote by Dave_Mc


I.e. a 5 minute song might have one bar/measure you're having trouble with and practising the whole song when it's just that one bar/measure which is the problem isn't exactly the most efficient way to work on your weaknesses. Of course you could always practise the one bar/measure you're having difficulty with separately, which is maybe the best of both worlds.

You kind of have to play it by ear, try both ways (or a combination) and see what helps.


I agree with this. I am a strong proponent of repeatedly practicing the problem part until it is no longer a problem part. I personally don't even move to the next section of a song until I've mastered the first section.