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#1
I thought Neo was.

Kinda wondering whether or not to do a phD in 5 or 10 years time. Not 100% sure though, you never know what life brings you.

So...how does one go about getting accepted to do one?
#2
I think Neo's pretending to do one
'And after a while, you can work on points for style.
Like the club tie, and the firm handshake,
A certain look in the eye and an easy smile.'

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You'll get the chance to put the knife in.'
#3
Universities usually have some projects they need PhD students for and they put it on their site when that is the case. You just have to apply like for a normal job.

If you want your own project, I don't know how that works in the natural sciences, but in Economics you can do an Mphil or some other graduate course and they pick their PhD Students from there. It's how I did it.

My university offered me some positions, but none of the subjects seemed to be cool so I joined their Mphil program.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
Last edited by Neo Evil11 at Mar 5, 2014,
#4
Neo does one with the intent of dropping out and living as a hobo. I hate to bash a fellow Dutch person but I doubt he's a good example
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#5
Quote by BjarnedeGraaf
Neo does one with the intent of dropping out and living as a hobo. I hate to bash a fellow Dutch person but I doubt he's a good example

Hey. Everyone can have their dreams.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#6
dont quite know what PhD is, is it the same as a master's program? if so, then yes I am.
I'm done with 5 years of studying and going up with a master's thesis in 3 months time.


If Ph.D is something else, then nope, I'm not. lel
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Last edited by JohnnyGenzale at Mar 5, 2014,
#7
I'm doing a Masters right now but **** doing a PhD. Not sure on the salary but I don't think it's great and after 4 years as a student I don't really want to live like a student for another 3.
#8
Quote by EndTheRapture51
I'm doing a Masters right now but **** doing a PhD. Not sure on the salary but I don't think it's great and after 4 years as a student I don't really want to live like a student for another 3.


Yeah, this is true. I know in my uni they pay their phD students minimum wage.

I think that would kinda suck balls.

There's a phD student in my course just now who's around 50, and everyone knows she's a millionaire. Kids moved out of the house. She was bored. Did a phD. What a life.

She's also smoking hot.
#9
not at the moment but there's this hot phD student in my research group I'd like to do
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#10
Quote by Neo Evil11
Universities usually have some projects they need PhD students for and they put it on their site when that is the case. You just have to apply like for a normal job.

If you want your own project, I don't know how that works in the natural sciences, but in Economics you can do an Mphil or some other graduate course and they pick their PhD Students from there. It's how I did it.

My university offered me some positions, but none of the subjects seemed to be cool so I joined their Mphil program.


So what did you do? Did you just keep an eye out all the time? Or did you keep in touch with lecturers after your Bachelors?

Also, what's the deal with funding?
#11
I finished my Bachelors, and am doing a Masters now. In Europe, Masters (2 years) are followed PhD's (4years). I understood that in the USA, the Master and PhD's are combined for some reason. I want to do a PhD after I graduate my Master.


edit: Also, in Europe, PhD's conduct their research on a pretty independent level and get paid. In the USA, as far as I understood, PhD's are still 'real students' who are under a lot of supervision.
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Last edited by unnamedplayer at Mar 5, 2014,
#12
Quote by Philip_pepper
So what did you do? Did you just keep an eye out all the time? Or did you keep in touch with lecturers after your Bachelors?

Also, what's the deal with funding?

No I joined a special program which gives a PhD only with much more courses.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#14
Just finishing my PhD now (writing up!). I did bachelors, masters then PhD. Master and PhD were in the same department.

Yes wage is pretty low but you don't pay income or council tax on it which helps in the UK.
#15
In a PhD now...You need to contact professors at different universities that do research similar to what you're interested in and tell them about yourself and that you think you're a fit for their lab, etc. and ask if they will be accepting a PhD student the following year. Many only take one every few years b/c they are usually responsible for student salary. The ones that show interest, those are the schools you apply to. Basically even if you're grades aren't ridiculously good you can still get it if when looking over applications that prof says "hey i'm interested in him bring him in for the interviews." Then it's up to interviewing well and getting accepted.
#16
I will probably study for PHD, education is free where I live and I'd rather study than work full-time, so that suits me.
#17
I'm doing one in a couple of years after my masters but I haven't organised anything yet obv so can't help you.

The MPhil is generally used as a transition degree. It's worth more than an MA but less than a PhD. Most people don't complete their MPhil though and switch directly to a PhD after it (and it makes your PhD a year shorter).
Last edited by captainsnazz at Mar 5, 2014,
#18
I wanted to do that out of highschool, but now that I'm almost done with my bachelor's I realize I hate my chosen field so much I couldn't possibly stand 4 more years of this shit. I don't even know if I want to get a MS. If you've got the cash do it. I personally am already racked with loan debt.
#19
I'm fine with just getting a Bachelors where I'm at. Finishing Masters and PhD programs has become an overly boring and tedious process, requiring you to do crap like assembling committees and writing a 300 page thesis. Most people who do it at my school are either middle aged or just graduated but couldn't find their dream job so they decided to rack up even more debt by going back to school.
#20
PhDs are mostly good if you want to be an instructor. At least that's how it seems to be in the US, where literally all CS instructors have their doctorates.

And it makes sense that way, to be honest.

But I have no desire for that. I might pursue a master's degree, but first I'd rather live life for a year or two.
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#21
I'm working on a PhD in political theory and international relations at a Canadian university. Applying for a PhD is not like applying for a job, but your acceptance into a program will depend on whether or not there is someone at the school who is interested in and capable of supervising what you would like to research. If you are aware of a professor at a school who could, you should probably get in touch with them.

In addition to that, undergraduate and graduate marks are important. But if you have some bad marks, I think that can be explained away by some solid reference letters.

In Canada, graduate students -- from what I understand -- are almost always given a scholarship or fellowship, or guaranteed a teaching assistant or research assistant position in order to pay tuition. I'm currently given $25,000 per year for leading a tutorial session for fifty-minutes per week (and staying enrolled in the program and doing my own work, of course).

If you're seriously considering grad school, I think you need to also consider how well you deal with misery and depression. There are times when it is absolutely terrible. I just finished the written part of my comprehensive exams, and I was so miserable back in September... dropping out crossed my mind every few seconds.
#22
Quote by Philip_pepper
I thought Neo was.

Kinda wondering whether or not to do a phD in 5 or 10 years time. Not 100% sure though, you never know what life brings you.

So...how does one go about getting accepted to do one?



In what field? That will change a lot of what you need to know. I'm starting a Ph.D. program in the fall for molecular genetics and genomics. For the sciences (biology, biochemistry, chemistry, physics, etc), any decent Ph.D. program will support you, at least in the US. That includes waiving tuition and granting you a decent stipend (~22-30k a year depending on location of the school, etc) at the bare minimum. More competitive schools may also throw in health insurance, dental, etc. You might be obligated to TA for a semester or two in such programs.

To get in, you're going to need a decent undergraduate GPA, 2 or 3 good letters of recommendation from previous professors or qualified professionals in the field, strong writing in your application, and a decent score on the GRE (a standardized test for graduate programs in the US, not sure if Europe has anything similar). Previous research experience will definitely improve your chances of getting in, and if you're trying to go anywhere competitive, it's an absolute must.

Once you get your application, letters of recommendation, transcripts, and all that junk to them, they'll review them. If they're interested, they'll likely invite you to interview with them along with other candidates. You meet with faculty that you think you might be interested in working with if you are accepted. If everything goes well, they'll accept you afterwards within a few weeks, and BAM, you're in.

As for other fields, you're going to be footing the bill yourself for the most part. There are fellowships and teaching assistant ships out there for everything though, so you can negate some of the cost. As for admissions, I assume it's relatively similar, though the research experience is likely not as necessary.

Should be sure it's really what you want though. 5-6 years and a lot of hard work is what you're signing up for.
#23
Quote by ohp-kyle
I'm working on a PhD in political theory and international relations at a Canadian university. Applying for a PhD is not like applying for a job, but your acceptance into a program will depend on whether or not there is someone at the school who is interested in and capable of supervising what you would like to research. If you are aware of a professor at a school who could, you should probably get in touch with them.

In addition to that, undergraduate and graduate marks are important. But if you have some bad marks, I think that can be explained away by some solid reference letters.

In Canada, graduate students -- from what I understand -- are almost always given a scholarship or fellowship, or guaranteed a teaching assistant or research assistant position in order to pay tuition. I'm currently given $25,000 per year for leading a tutorial session for fifty-minutes per week (and staying enrolled in the program and doing my own work, of course).

If you're seriously considering grad school, I think you need to also consider how well you deal with misery and depression. There are times when it is absolutely terrible. I just finished the written part of my comprehensive exams, and I was so miserable back in September... dropping out crossed my mind every few seconds.


Misery and depression? I'm no stranger to that.

But...why is a postgrade miserable and depressing?

Quote by CrossBack7
In what field? That will change a lot of what you need to know. I'm starting a Ph.D. program in the fall for molecular genetics and genomics. For the sciences (biology, biochemistry, chemistry, physics, etc), any decent Ph.D. program will support you, at least in the US. That includes waiving tuition and granting you a decent stipend (~22-30k a year depending on location of the school, etc) at the bare minimum. More competitive schools may also throw in health insurance, dental, etc. You might be obligated to TA for a semester or two in such programs.

To get in, you're going to need a decent undergraduate GPA, 2 or 3 good letters of recommendation from previous professors or qualified professionals in the field, strong writing in your application, and a decent score on the GRE (a standardized test for graduate programs in the US, not sure if Europe has anything similar). Previous research experience will definitely improve your chances of getting in, and if you're trying to go anywhere competitive, it's an absolute must.

Once you get your application, letters of recommendation, transcripts, and all that junk to them, they'll review them. If they're interested, they'll likely invite you to interview with them along with other candidates. You meet with faculty that you think you might be interested in working with if you are accepted. If everything goes well, they'll accept you afterwards within a few weeks, and BAM, you're in.

As for other fields, you're going to be footing the bill yourself for the most part. There are fellowships and teaching assistant ships out there for everything though, so you can negate some of the cost. As for admissions, I assume it's relatively similar, though the research experience is likely not as necessary.

Should be sure it's really what you want though. 5-6 years and a lot of hard work is what you're signing up for.


Man, that sounds kinda awesome. But 5-6 years? Damn. I thought it was mostly 4 years.

It would be an optometry phD.
Last edited by Philip_pepper at Mar 5, 2014,
#26
Quote by Philip_pepper
I thought Neo was.

Kinda wondering whether or not to do a phD in 5 or 10 years time. Not 100% sure though, you never know what life brings you.

So...how does one go about getting accepted to do one?


I did one in Chemical Engineering, graduated in 2012.

It's a tough slog. Depending on the professor you do it under:
- some will have an exact plan of how the work will proceed, this is great! Generally quite well structured and you have a definite, if vague, goal from the start
- others (like mine) are more relaxed in how the research will go. This has it's benefits in the sense that you can try many different avenues of research, but can be cumbersome trying to tie it all in to the one solid block of research when it comes to writing up.

The writing-up part is the most discouraging. You've worked hard for the last 3 - 5 years, then have to try to make sense of everything, trying to justify experiments you may have performed 4 years ago can be disheartening, especially if you didn't keep an accurate record of everything you did.

To be honest, you say you won't be considering one for 5 - 10 years, so I wouldn't really worry too much about it for the next couple of years.

I had a research project in final year that gave me a taste for it, so I asked around the different professors in my department if any of them were planning on taking on PhD's the following year. Keep in mind you'll typically need at least a 2:1 grade, but a first is a more likely requirement if you want to get accepted.

Any more questions, fire away!
#27
First, why are you thinking about getting a PhD?
If it is for "more" money, make sure that is the case with whatever field you would study. I have one in Physics, and it does pay more than when I had "just" the M.S., but only about 8%. So the "payback" for another two years can take 10 or more years.

If you are thinking about getting one because of the prestige, that is probably true - but only from other PhD folks.

If you want more knowledge, you don't need another degree. Just do it!
#28
Quote by Philip_pepper


Man, that sounds kinda awesome. But 5-6 years? Damn. I thought it was mostly 4 years.

It would be an optometry phD.


Well, I assume optometry wouldn't need any research experience though. And I was considering trying to go to the UK for mine and the degrees were 4 years, so as others have said, would probably be less for you.
#30
i already have a pretty huge dick

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#31
Just starting one in behavioural neuroscience (physiological psych) this spring, moving into it from an M.Sc.

It seems to vary by country how the process works. In the US, people seem to go right to a PhD from undergrad, at least in the sciences, if they want to be an academic researcher. here in Canada, most seem to do a 2 year masters. It seems lots of UK schools have one-year masters, and a distinction between taught and research degrees that I don't think exists in N. America.
#32
ANd in the end, we can be hobos together. We can call you Bald and myself Dutch.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#35
Quote by CodeMonk
Or Dr. Pepper.


My professor for geography was a Dr. Pepper.
My God, it's full of stars!
#36
Yea **** PhDs. I'd kill myself If I spent that much longer in school being miserable. And from what I've seen, in my major there isn't a significant salary bump from masters to PhD. Not like that affects me since I don't think I could handle getting a masters either.
#37
Quote by dkcol
First, why are you thinking about getting a PhD?
If it is for "more" money, make sure that is the case with whatever field you would study. I have one in Physics, and it does pay more than when I had "just" the M.S., but only about 8%. So the "payback" for another two years can take 10 or more years.

If you are thinking about getting one because of the prestige, that is probably true - but only from other PhD folks.

If you want more knowledge, you don't need another degree. Just do it!


Honestly, I got no idea where I'll be in 5 years. Might be in a good situation or a bad one. It'd be nice to know whether doing a phD is a possible road to go down.

I'm not mega worried about money.
#38
Dropping out of my doctoral program was the best decision I ever made
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#39
You absolutely should not do a PhD if all you want is more money. For the love of god just stick to a B.S. / M.S.

If you enjoy what you do and have curious mind, if you want to explore to a deeper level, a more intricate and intimate one, then you may want to do a phd. If you want to go into academia it's an absolute essential that you do one (add a post-doc on top of that).
#40
Quote by TunerAddict
Dropping out of my doctoral program was the best decision I ever made

What program were you in?
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