#1
I'm working on some new material & I'm after a really thick drum sound similar to these:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xj1909rt_e8

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=93HEohCRrfA

I use Addictive Drums & I know straight away I'm not likely to nail either of those sounds 100% with it, but I need to get as close as possible. I'm breaking down the kit into separate tracks and approaching it just the same as I would a real mic'd acoustic kit & I'm using the Sonor Designer 14 x 6" snare for sure. Obviously a lot of getting the these types of sounds lies in getting the kick & snare (not to mention the toms) sounding right, and that's where I need the most help. Any and all tips on compression, EQ'ing, and so on are more than welcome. Thanks!
#2
These are processed dance kits. You'd be better off looking for new samples and running them through a drum sampler.
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Quote by DisarmGoliath
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#3
Quote by ChemicalFire
These are processed dance kits. You'd be better off looking for new samples and running them through a drum sampler.


I'm aware that there's obviously some processing going on, but I'm absolutely certain that's an acoustic kit on the Mutemath song & I'm nearly as sure the drums in the Hellogoodbye song are acoustic as well. What I'm asking is what kind of processing can I do with AD to get in the ballpark of these sounds?
#4
There's a SHIT tonne of compression on their and the entire thing has been polished to an inhuman shine. Either way you'll be better off getting samples because these guys obviously have VERY expensive production teams behind them who have lots of skill and equipment. The entire mix has likely been brickwalled as well, in fact it definitely has.

Just try your best and see what you can come up with. In the end your inability to have such polished and pro drum sounds shouldn't stop you from creating. Just like not all of us can shred like Paul Gilbert, not all of us can produce to a pro level.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
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#5
Without even listening I can tell you almost certainly that even if they used an acoustic kit, they also augmented it with samples. That's just the day-to-day game for most big engineers now, as it saves time over perfecting a raw acoustic kit on its own.
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#6
Quote by ChemicalFire
There's a SHIT tonne of compression on their and the entire thing has been polished to an inhuman shine. Either way you'll be better off getting samples because these guys obviously have VERY expensive production teams behind them who have lots of skill and equipment. The entire mix has likely been brickwalled as well, in fact it definitely has.

Just try your best and see what you can come up with. In the end your inability to have such polished and pro drum sounds shouldn't stop you from creating. Just like not all of us can shred like Paul Gilbert, not all of us can produce to a pro level.



I'm not saying it's the rawest sound in the world, but it's the type of sound that would be conducive to a couple of the songs I'm working on at the moment.

I appreciate the point you're trying to make, but don't get to thinking that not getting these exact sounds is going to at all hinder my creating & getting this stuff done :p lol. I know everyone views it their own way, but I personally set my own production standards really, really high. I reference pro, big-budget mixes & do everything in my power to get as absolutely close to them in quality as possible and it serves me quite well (to the point that people, including many musicians much more experienced than myself, almost unanimously think that my music all comes out of a pro studio). The way I see it, if I'm going to do something, I should do it full-on and to the highest standard in order to achieve the strongest results. That's just the way I approach everything and it's an approach that has yet to fail me.

I apologize if I come off as arrogant or cross - that's not my intention at all. What I'm getting at is that this is a particular type of sound that I've come to like a lot lately and it isn't a drum sound I've ever tried to achieve before, which is why I'm looking for a little guidance in getting as near as I can to that type of sound with the tools I have available to me.
#7
Quote by DisarmGoliath
Without even listening I can tell you almost certainly that even if they used an acoustic kit, they also augmented it with samples. That's just the day-to-day game for most big engineers now, as it saves time over perfecting a raw acoustic kit on its own.



Thanks! I'll give that a shot
#8
What I'm recommending is to listen to the sound of your kit as it is, once you're happy with a ballpark sound, and then listen to these references, and try to think what direction you need to take each bit of the kit to meet the main focus of their mix.

Like, you can't make everything sound full and complete, so you need to analyse the whole mix (including with your whole mix playing, too) and decide what it is that stands out in the mix the most, for the drums - then you want to get your kit doing something similar, in your mix.

An example would be a mix where you have a really heavy kick impact, but the bassline is really low and grinding - obviously you can't have the kick and the bass guitar both occupying the same spot at high volume because it'll drown everything else out and waste headroom, plus the mix will pump like hell when mastering compression is applied. You would instead need to find ways to still achieve it, such as sidechaining a compressor on the bass, with the kick as the input, so that when the kick hits you duck the bass guitar by a few dB; or that the bass guitar has a cut around (for example) 60Hz and a boost at 120, whereas the kick does the reverse... they're the same note, an octave apart, but now you can differentiate between the impact of the kick, and the body of the bass (and could then add some click/definition to the kick in the 2kHz, or next multiples of that [e.g. 4kHz and 8kHz] sorta area).


Those numbers are all examples and not to be taken as precise values to work for every mix - they're only approximations of common centre frequencies that I guess you could work away from if you're really stuck.


If, though, you listen and there are differences that you're struggling to find, or are tough to achieve on your stock kit without radical processing, you may decide it's better or easier to try blending in some samples... say your snare needs more crack and definition, you might find a really bright and trebley snare, and mix it in with your original one. Or you might want to add some sub/low end to your kick, so you can choose a low and flabby kick that has little definition, then compress the crap out of it, EQ it a little and maybe use an envelope filter to shape the decay, then blend it into the mix.
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