#1
Really like this guitar ,just thought I'd ask your opinions as its only my second buy in guitars and I know there's a lot of fakes out there and I wudnt have a clue how to spot one!

http://adverts.ie/4939576
#2
That guitar is so old I can’t remember too much about what the originals looked like. But I don’t recall that people were faking Epiphones in 1997. I don’t even think the Chinese guitar industry had even come far enough to create a passable fake Epiphone in 1997.

If you do buy the guitar give it a very thorough inspection. 1990s Epiphones could be pretty shitty guitars.
#3
parwau (i always get the spelling wrong) will hopefully chime in. dude is a savant when it comes to epi's.
#4
Just ask him for a picture of the serial number on the back of the headstock, I think there's a way of checking online or you could always phone or email epiphone to ask, it would probably take quite a while for them to find though.
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#5
Quote by ProgFripp74
Just ask him for a picture of the serial number on the back of the headstock…


Serial numbers are almost worthless for verifying a guitar’s authenticity. Fake guitars use serial numbers taken from the real guitars used as models for the fakes.
#6
Quote by ProgFripp74
Just ask him for a picture of the serial number on the back of the headstock, I think there's a way of checking online or you could always phone or email epiphone to ask, it would probably take quite a while for them to find though.


I emailed epi about 6 months ago looking for info on the one I own.
Gave them the serial and color with a brief discription of headstock and body style. I Was expecting it to take a couple weeks, they got back to me within an hour with the exact model and a link to a picture of my exact one
#7
Quote by Aether89
I emailed epi about 6 months ago looking for info on the one I own.
Gave them the serial and color with a brief discription of headstock and body style. I Was expecting it to take a couple weeks, they got back to me within an hour with the exact model and a link to a picture of my exact one


The big two guitar makers are pretty quick on trying to prove real ones from fakes. Pretty much all of them will get back to you in a matter of days, if not minutes.
Actually, I go by Dave, but there are already too many Daves on this forum.


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#8
Quote by Aether89
I emailed epi about 6 months ago looking for info on the one I own.
Gave them the serial and color with a brief discription of headstock and body style. I Was expecting it to take a couple weeks, they got back to me within an hour with the exact model and a link to a picture of my exact one


A photo match doesn’t mean a guitar is genuine. Newer Chinese fakes are based on real guitars. They buy real guitars and disassemble them to match the measurements, color, tuners, knobs, serial number, and they photograph genuine guitars for the images that goe on the web stores. Then they make hundreds of fakes that look just like the original. Unless a guitar has a distinctive figured top a photo doesn’t prove any more than a certificate of authenticity or a serial number.
#9
Quote by wld-kid
Really like this guitar ,just thought I'd ask your opinions as its only my second buy in guitars and I know there's a lot of fakes out there and I wudnt have a clue how to spot one!

http://adverts.ie/4939576


Nobody can tell for sure with this pics....

though it seems to be fine
it probably was made in the Czech Bohemia factory
they are known for their 'own' and 'different' specs

more pics will get you better answers

here is a link to compare the specs

http://epiphonewiki.com/index.php/Slash_Signatures#Slash_Snakepit_Les_Paul
Last edited by paruwi at Mar 6, 2014,
#10
Quote by Aether89
I emailed epi about 6 months ago looking for info on the one I own.
Gave them the serial and color with a brief discription of headstock and body style. I Was expecting it to take a couple weeks, they got back to me within an hour with the exact model and a link to a picture of my exact one


Usually I get answers within one day - mostly within some hours....
#11
Quote by jpnyc
A photo match doesn’t mean a guitar is genuine. Newer Chinese fakes are based on real guitars. They buy real guitars and disassemble them to match the measurements, color, tuners, knobs, serial number, and they photograph genuine guitars for the images that goe on the web stores. Then they make hundreds of fakes that look just like the original. Unless a guitar has a distinctive figured top a photo doesn’t prove any more than a certificate of authenticity or a serial number.


Though they still can't figure out to do it properly,

easy to spot - if you know what to look for
#12
Quote by paruwi
Though they still can't figure out to do it properly,


I've never figured that out.

In a world where every possible measurement of an original is available (and especially in the country that already makes the originals), why in the world do we see dumb and obvious errors on Gibson and Epiphone copies? We already have guys in places like Israel making replicas of original Holy Grail '59 bursts that are nearly impossible for the experts to tell from the real thing, and they're doing it in their garages with hand tools.

But when it comes to run of the mill production crap, the fakes get it wildly wrong.

I have a theory.

There are SO many used Gibson and Epiphones out there that Gibson could shut down production entirely and we'd have enough guitars to go around for the next half century or so. Gibson makes no money whatsoever off the used market; only off new sales.

What would happen if some marketing wonk got the idea that if Gibson could find a way to throw FUD (Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt) into the user market, more buyers would be herded toward buying New, just to avoid the possibility of getting a fake and wasting their money?

If you were Gibson, you'd want to make sure that the fakes weren't TOO good (otherwise someone might realize that maybe it might actually be smarter to buy the fake than the real thing), so you'd change a spec here and there, change materials, and make mistakes that sharp-eyed buyers could fairly easily spot (too-small split diamonds and tilted logos, control holes that didn't line up correctly, etc.

What WOULD happen if those Chinese replica folks DID tighten up their act? I'm thinking it would tighten some sphincters at Gibson...
Last edited by dspellman at Mar 6, 2014,
#13
Quote by dspellman
I've never figured that out.


I think it comes down to the difference between fakes make for people who know better and fakes made to fool people. The sloppy fakes are banged out with sloppy manufacturing tolerances because they’re made to be dumped in cheap electronics stores where people assume they’re buying knockoffs. But there are also really nice fakes that look real until you open up the electronics cavity and see a sloppy mess of solder and notice that the body is actually plywood. Those are the guitars people are selling on the secondary market as the real thing.

Quote by dspellman
What WOULD happen if those Chinese replica folks DID tighten up their act?


They’d sell their own designs and make more money, just like the Japanese makers did.