#1
I am looking for some tips on where I should look to get started making guitar videos for youtube. The reason is that I want a way to record myself playing is so that I can show it to other guitarists and get input on my progress and technic as well as make some friends along the way. I also need a way of making tracks to practice leads over my rhythm playing. I just don't know where to start looking. My price range is 1000

P.S. also looking for friends with similar musical interests as myself.
#2
If you have a smartphone or another video camera, you can use that to record yourself. Then add in your properly produced audio. Youtube butchers the video quality anyway so there's no need to spend much on a camera.

What equipment do you have already? If you don't have a decent amp, it might be worth using amp modelling software.
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#3
Quote by reincarnator
If you have a smartphone or another video camera, you can use that to record yourself. Then add in your properly produced audio. Youtube butchers the video quality anyway so there's no need to spend much on a camera.

What equipment do you have already? If you don't have a decent amp, it might be worth using amp modelling software.


Right now I play through a Line 6 spider 3 and a Marshall Valvestate 2000 AVT
#4
Smartphone and one of those small condenser mics that attach to the phone like the iM2 and you are golden.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#5
You can pick up canon/nikon dlsr cameras quite cheaply - then you'll also have a good camera!
You can pick up a Presonus Audio Box for quiet cheaply.
You could get a Shure Sm57 or an Audiotechnica AT2020 for quite cheap.
You could get a daw like Reaper for quite cheap
You could get a cheap,basic video editing program.

Your budget is quite high for the thing you want to do. So you might as well get good stuff that may be pretty useful to you down the track.

As a musician you'll eventually lead into learning basic recording and DAW operations. That just seems to be the lay of the land these days.
#6
Read the interfaces sticky and get whichever of the recommended interfaces there you feel is the best choice (any of them can do a perfectly good job for what you want, but something like the Scarlett 2i4 would give you better options in the future).
If you get an interface that can use microphones then decide if you want to mic your amp, or use amp simulators (I'd recommend the latter with your gear).
If you want to mic your amp, then you'll want a dynamic mic like the Shure SM57. If you're using amp sims then check out LePou's plugins, and find some impulses (Catharsis impulses are great if you can find them, otherwise I like the 'Sperimental Pack).
Then you'll need some software to record the audio, I (along with most of this board) recommend REAPER.
Now you're good to go on the audio side of things.

Next is adding the video. For that you need some kind of video camera (a phone camera works fine, but you could get a proper camera and use it for higher quality video), and some video editing software (I use Sony Vegas, if you're on a Mac then iMovie is fine, not sure if Windows Movie Maker can do what you need it to anymore).

When you record, do something after you're finished to help sync the audio and the video together (if you're using a microphone then clapping works well, for direct guitar then a sharp muted strum will do). Export your audio from REAPER, and load it and the video into your software. After that it's a matter of lining up the peak in the recorded audio with the peak in the camera's audio, or the moment you do the action in the video itself. Then mute the camera's audio track, trim off the bit you used to sync it up, and you're good to go.
#7
^ Yes clapping is the best for easily syncing.
Let's add that you will ned to record your audio at 48KHz
#8
No you don't, the differences between listening to 44.1kHz and 48kHz are debatable at best, and definitely inaudible to about 99% of listeners
#9
Quote by chatterbox272
No you don't, the differences between listening to 44.1kHz and 48kHz are debatable at best, and definitely inaudible to about 99% of listeners

Whilst i agree with you in regards to the sonic differences. 48KHz is important for video for sync reasons.
#10
How on earth is that going to affect syncing? Also if that's the case how come every single one of mine have been done at 44.1 and I've never had an issue?
#11
Quote by chatterbox272
How on earth is that going to affect syncing? Also if that's the case how come every single one of mine have been done at 44.1 and I've never had an issue?

48 thousand samples Vs 44.1 thousand samples. Maybe along the way you up-sampled without realizing?
#12
thanks to everyone who replied to this thread. you have all been a big help