#2
its kinda funny , I just came back to guitar techniques to re look at posture !

looks to me like they use the straight forearm im trying desperately to get , so as to avoid excess pain in there hands .

Looks like I need to raise leg more and tuck in elbow more QQ
#3
That's the ONLY way I can play while sitting. To me, having the guitar body resting on my right leg and the neck parallel to the ground is about as unnatural as it comes. However, I spent the first 17+ years of my playing standing up. Then I bought a V-style guitar and those are super-comfy in that classical position -- feels just like guitar does while standing up.

I'll ask you this: When you stand up to play, do you sling your guitar super-high and hold the neck parallel to the ground? I doubt it. You probably angle the neck up to a certain degree, because that makes fingering easier, especially on the upper frets.
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#4
That is the classical guitar posture, how guitar was originally played.
http://classicalguitarblogger.com/blog3/2008/05/14/correct-posture-for-guitarists/


The casual/western posture, the guitar on your right leg and held sideways, came later. Pros of classical posture is that it is (usually) much closer to the way you play standing up. Also it is IMHO (or atleast for my body) better for your form, especially if you play with your thumb behind the neck (the classical way) and not over it. Your wrist is in better angle that way. You also tend to slough less. Only downside that I can think of is the need for elevating your left leg with something because simply holding the guitar in good upwards angle with your foot starts to hurt your leg muscles in longer practice periods.

A lot of people find casual posture more natural to them but I personally hate it. I could never find a good form with it, something was always tensing up and I generally felt uncomfortable. My right shoulder was especially problematic, due to my bulky build and generally always-tensed-up (thanks to physical work I do) body. I switched to classical and all those problems went away in instant. Also the Classical way, as KailM pointed out, is the only way to play V guitars when sitting down, with your right leg tucked inside the V and neck held upwards with your left leg. Trying to hold it sideways on your right leg is nothing short of awkward, it slides around all over the place.

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Last edited by MaaZeus at Mar 8, 2014,
#5
^^Haha, you have the same problem as me. In "casual" position, my right shoulder starts to cramp up after only a few minutes. And I also have a very muscular build -- partially due to genetics, but also due to the hard physical work I've done most of my life.

The problem I have now is that only V-style guitars feel appropriate for me -- but I'd really like to add a super-strat to my collection. It's actually difficult to hold most other body styles in the classical position though.
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#6
Quote by KailM
^^Haha, you have the same problem as me. In "casual" position, my right shoulder starts to cramp up after only a few minutes. And I also have a very muscular build -- partially due to genetics, but also due to the hard physical work I've done most of my life.

The problem I have now is that only V-style guitars feel appropriate for me -- but I'd really like to add a super-strat to my collection. It's actually difficult to hold most other body styles in the classical position though.



Yup. I am also a naturally big broad shouldered giant. I can lift a lot of shit up from ground but dont expect me or my arms to bend much in any direction.

Try Les Paul. I think its comfy in classical posture. Hell, its shape is almost like a classical guitar except for the fret cut.

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Last edited by MaaZeus at Mar 8, 2014,
#7
Thats the posture I had to use when I used to play classical guitar (I play the electric now). HATED IT WITH ALL MY HEART. Most uncomfortable possition ever and at my first year my back hurt constantly for this possiotion so at home I used a half assed western possition, picked up some bad habbits by doing it and I still have some posture problems now :/ I wish I started playing the western possition from the start
#8
I started using my strap to simulate the classical position while seated last year.

I realized some time ago that if I ever wanted to practice standing up, I'd have to get to a position that virtually identical to that. Playing with my guitar on my right leg doesn't help.
#9
A classical position works for some but not everybody is comfortable at playing in that position.

Having both legs securely positioning the guitar gives the fretting and strumming/picking hand the ability to move freely all over the neck without actually "holding" the guitar in position.

At the end of the day, it's all about the player being comfortable. We can play in any position we want.
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#10
I've got to find the most comfortable position for a guy with long arms and a beer gut.

I'm finding that shrinking the beer gut makes any position infinitely more comfortable .
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#11
Quote by Derek Woolley
Hey guys, I saw this video on youtube a while a go and wondered why they held their guitars like this. I tried holding mine the same way while sitting a few times and it feels really awkward. Is there some special benefit to holding your guitar like this?
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xtVx01HMR98


Classical guitars are held that way typically.