#1
Let me start off by saying that Forms is by far my worst subject and it's just not my thing.

Anyways, this piece is really short (just a bit over a minute), and it's by Prokofiev.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SRDWKIJnVE0

From first glance, I'd guess maybe it's in rondo form, although the first time you here the a section, it ends on the ii chord before going to the b section.

And even then, it feels weird calling it a rondo, as the a, b and c sections would really only be just a sentence or double period.
#2
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#4
Having only listened to it once, I'd say Rondo is a good chance. Sure sounds like it.

Couldn't really tell, but it might be some kind of ternary form. I know that he did some compositions in ternary form experimenting with dissonance.
#5
Seeing a score would help, but I would take a cue from his title. To me this is just a melody that gets modified and passed between the violin and piano a few times with a kind of codetta at the end. It's certainly not a rondo.
#6
Quote by jazz_rock_feel
It's certainly not a rondo.

How so? Not to question your knowledge on the subject but, like Madcap, musical forms are one of my weaker areas, so any help in the area is appreciated. I can't really hear the difference between this and a rondo?
#7
^Couple reasons. One a rondo is typically a much bigger form than this. Each refrain and episode will usually be at least an antecedent-consequent period (two phrases, usually 8 bars long). This piece is much smaller than that. For arguments sake you could call it like a micro-rondo or something, but there's a problem with that too, mainly because there's no B or C section! My guess is that you're calling the violin melody the 'A' section, but if you listen to the piano when the violin doesn't have the main melody, it's playing a version of that same main melody.
#8
I see, so in a way you could consider it a miniature version of variations on a theme, with one variation I suppose?

Also, I asked my original question since at the minute I'm composing a piece that should end up only being 3 or 4 minutes long, and I'm quite unsure of its structure. So far I have a main theme or A section, a contrasting section and a return to an altered version of the A section, and I'm pretty sure I want to insert a C and a D section, both returning to the A.

Would this be considered a rondo? Like you said, most rondo's are pretty large scale works, however, for example, my main theme is 9 bars long while the B is nearly 20.

Sorry for lack of coherency or whatever, forms kinda screw with my head a bit.
#9
Quote by Tommat
I see, so in a way you could consider it a miniature version of variations on a theme, with one variation I suppose?

Yeah, if you absolutely had to give it a name it's closest to a small theme and variations.

Quote by Tommat
Also, I asked my original question since at the minute I'm composing a piece that should end up only being 3 or 4 minutes long, and I'm quite unsure of its structure. So far I have a main theme or A section, a contrasting section and a return to an altered version of the A section, and I'm pretty sure I want to insert a C and a D section, both returning to the A.

Would this be considered a rondo? Like you said, most rondo's are pretty large scale works, however, for example, my main theme is 9 bars long while the B is nearly 20.

Sorry for lack of coherency or whatever, forms kinda screw with my head a bit.

So right now you have an ABA' which is called ternary form. If you had ABACADA you could call it a rondo if you wanted (the typical seven part rondo is ABACABA).

Remember these are just names. These common forms were standardized and developed over the course of 150 years or so between 1750-1900 (although technically their history extends a lot further back than that). The names are just names and the forms are just one way of organizing musical thought. The Prokofiev example is great to see this: it's not one of these standard forms and yet the form is clear and strong.