#1
Long time no see, UG!

Any chance you guys could tell me about the finer points of whether or not it's harmful to play an acoustic-electric guitar through an amp designed for electric guitars? I'm asking in general, but the amp in question is a Vox Valvetronix AD100VT-XL.

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#4
Any chance it could be harmful to the speakers if done long-term?
Quote by Nomack
Next hendrix is like a a sidesplitting triumph of slapstick and scatology, a runaway moneymaker and budding franchise, the worst thing to happen to Kazakhstan since the Mongol hordes, and, a communist.


This is my sig!
#6
Nah there are plenty of people who do it regularly. I know a guy who pretty much exclusively plays his acoustic through an orange Rockerverb 50 head and cab and has never had a problem.
#7
You can feed pretty much anything at the input of your guitar amplifier. (be it guitar or a microphone or a portable mp3 player. If it sounds good is another story) As long as its not something high wattage that is. Like another power amp feeding 100 watts to the preamp of your guitar amplifier etc. Common sense stuff really. It is an amplifier that amplifies weak analog signal louder and possibly alters it in the process (EQ and distortion). Your acoustic-electric is exactly that stuff.

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Bugera 333
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#8
Quote by MaaZeus
You can feed pretty much anything at the input of your guitar amplifier. (be it guitar or a microphone or a portable mp3 player. If it sounds good is another story) As long as its not something high wattage that is. Like another power amp feeding 100 watts to the preamp of your guitar amplifier etc. Common sense stuff really. It is an amplifier that amplifies weak analog signal louder and possibly alters it in the process (EQ and distortion). Your acoustic-electric is exactly that stuff.



Except for a bass guitar. Probably also not a good idea to play a keyboard through a guitar amp. Both could cause damage.
#9
Quote by ethan_hanus
Done it before, sounds terrible, but it wont explode into a fireball of flaming death biscuits from hell.


I love flaming death biscuits from hell. Great midnight snack with jam.
#10
Quote by ethan_hanus
Doubt it, it's a midrange instrument and your speakers are mid range so itd be fine, just don't hit the gain with your acoustic in, feedback from hell will incur.


Acoustic guitars are rather more full-range instruments; if you notice, the better acoustic guitar amps (check out the Carvin AG100D) have closed-back ported cabinets and tweeters.

Last edited by dspellman at Mar 8, 2014,
#11
Quote by KG6_Steven
Except for a bass guitar. Probably also not a good idea to play a keyboard through a guitar amp. Both could cause damage.


Won't hurt the amp.

Might hurt the speakers though.
#12
Quote by dspellman
Acoustic guitars are rather more full-range instruments; if you notice, the better acoustic guitar amps (check out the Carvin AG100D) have closed-back ported cabinets and tweeters.



Not sure that I'd equate the quality of an acoustic amp with the fact that it has a closed back. Whether it's open or closed back is nothing more than a design element. Acoustic amps are generally noted by the fact they have the addition of a tweeter. I own a certain Rivera acoustic amp, which is quite high in quality, but has an open back. This particular amp will handle both acoustic and electric guitar. When the acoustic portion of the amp is engaged, the tweeter is connected to the amp.
#13
Quote by iwannabesedated
Won't hurt the amp.

Might hurt the speakers though.



Bingo.