#1
Hi there,

I have just started learning music theory and was wondering if someone could help me. Would the root note of an open A chord be the open A sting? Also would the root note of the open E chord be the open low E string? Is it the same for Em and Am?

Thanks
#2
The root note is the lowest note (the bass note), so yes you'd be correct.
#3
Yes to all four. The root note is always the lowest note of a chord, unless it's an inversion - then it will contain the note which it starts on in the name, for example D/A, means a D major chord starting on an A. If you don't see that slash notation, then you can safely assume that the lowest note is the root.

Hope this helps!
#4
The root note is the note that a chord is based around. So in an A chord of any type (whether it is A major, A minor, A7, Asus4, A13b11, etc) A is always going to be the root note. Also the location of A within the chord is completely irrelevant. Even if you have an A chord that has 5 notes in it (we'll say two E and two C#) and the A is the highest note, the A is still the root note since it is an A chord.


Quote by vayne92
The root note is the lowest note (the bass note),


Um... no it isn't?
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#5
For an open A chord, yes. But as you learn more, just know that the lowest note in a chord is not always the root.
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#7
Quote by se012101
Yes to all four. The root note is always the lowest note of a chord, unless it's an inversion - then it will contain the note which it starts on in the name, for example D/A, means a D major chord starting on an A. If you don't see that slash notation, then you can safely assume that the lowest note is the root.

Hope this helps!

Am I mistaken, or do we notate inversions using slashes? Aren't those slash chords instead?

I mean, C/E would probably mean a similar thing to the first inversion of C, but you can also have something like C/D#.
Last edited by triface at Mar 9, 2014,
#8
Quote by triface
Am I mistaken, or do we notate inversions using slashes? Aren't those slash chords instead?

I mean, C/E would probably mean a similar thing to the first inversion of C, but you can also have something like C/D#.



When played on guitar, I prefer to refer to these chords as slash chords. While they are frequently referred to as inversions, they really aren't. In piano/keyboard, an inversion is constructed in a specific manner, in guitar, it's quite difficult to obtain the same thing. So, while one may loosely refer to the chord as an inversion on the guitar, in its strictest terms, it is merely a slash chord.

Yes, it is quite possible to have a C/D#, but again, it's nothing more than a C chord with a D# in the bass.
#9
Quote by KG6_Steven
When played on guitar, I prefer to refer to these chords as slash chords. While they are frequently referred to as inversions, they really aren't. In piano/keyboard, an inversion is constructed in a specific manner, in guitar, it's quite difficult to obtain the same thing. So, while one may loosely refer to the chord as an inversion on the guitar, in its strictest terms, it is merely a slash chord.

Yes, it is quite possible to have a C/D#, but again, it's nothing more than a C chord with a D# in the bass.

I see what you're saying. Could be talking about how inversions require certain notes to be in certain positions, such as how the original root note becomes the third note and only the third note in the first inversion?
#10
Slash chords indicate a moving bass line. If playing solo guitar you want to voice that line. If playing in a combo with keys and bass, you may just play the chord and let the other guys tag the moving bass. Sometimes it sounds really cool with all three playing a moving bass line and sometimes it just sounds dorky. Try it both ways and decide.
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