bobduff80
Registered User
Join date: May 2013
346 IQ
#1
was wondering which plectrums u favour above all others for acoustic. I got a timber tones 1 and absolutely love the percussive sound it gives while strumming.
theogonia777
Miss Kristen
Join date: Jun 2009
2,141 IQ
#3
I have these Dunlop Americana picks that I really dig. They are made specifically for bluegrass guitar and mandolin players. They are very wide and thick with highly rounded edges. They have a very soft and non-percussive sound for playing fast single note runs and tremolo picking and they are thick and sturdy enough for bluegrass rhythm playing.

The main downside is that, because they are so rounded, it doesn't get a very sharp attack and so they are fairly quiet compared to most other picks, and so you need to either pick harder or get the pick farther down into the strings. It definitely takes some getting used to, but the sound is pretty neat.

They are very weird to hold though. They are about 3mm in the center but taper to about 1.5mm closer to the outsides, and so they feel kind of strange, but oddly satisfying. The color and size of them makes them look very odd but unique (very old-timey, folky bluegrass look to them), and so they look silly with most instruments other than an acoustic guitar or mandolin (which is what they were designed for anyway).

They also come in a smaller, rounder, thinner variation with less of a point and more of a uniform thickness. They behave very similarly, but with an even softer (and quieter) attack that requires digging them in even further. I really don't like those ones.

They cost about $5 for a pack of three picks, which is a but expensive compared to other Dunlop flat picks (other than the Primetone and novelty picks), but that is still pretty negligible when it comes to music things, especially since they last for quite some time.
Quote by Hal-Sephira
Shut the mother#%$& up, $^%got. You have a #$%^ing terrible muther&@$#ing taste in %#$@ing music, @&%$ing movies and %&$#ing video games. Every time I see you on the forums, you are always saying something overrated and some $@&#ing sh*t. You are just mother$^@%ing ignorant as a whole.

Get a #%$@ing life or you will get banned for life.


Quote by Arby911
Kristen is very open-minded; believes that everyone is entitled to her opinion...


Quote by NirvanaLuvr16
omg its better than i imagined... so dark and cozy and warm...


Read this please. This as well.
captivate
d[-.-]b Asian Audiophile.
Join date: Apr 2007
1,602 IQ
#5
I've been using gravity picks as well as red bear trading co. picks (although my red bear died).

The Red Bear picks are actually VERY expensive... considering you're buying a pick, but my turtle shell Red Bear was by far the best sounding pick I had ever used. At $20, it was REALLY pricey. However, when I compared it to regular plain old plastic picks, the difference was night and day. I broke my red bear though... I have a little key chain pick holder and broke it in the cold while I was tobogganing and fell on it.

Currently, I'm using a 3mm Gravity pick. Overall, it sounds better than most picks I've used and feels great to boot. I still preferred my classic red bear pick... but that's not really an option anymore.

I would highly suggest anyone who doesn't lose their guitar picks constantly to spend a bit more and buy some of these really sweet picks. It's pricey, but if you're looking for great tone, you can't go wrong.
Equipment:
- Art & Lutherie Cedar CW (SOLD! )
- Martin D-16RGT w/ LR Baggs M1 Active Soundhole Pickup
- Seagull 25th Anniversary Flame Maple w/ LR Baggs Micro EQ

Have an acoustic guitar? Don't let your guitar dry out! Click here.
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
288 IQ
#6
Quote by captivate
...[ ]....The Red Bear picks are actually VERY expensive... considering you're buying a pick, but my turtle shell Red Bear was by far the best sounding pick I had ever used. At $20, it was REALLY pricey. However, when I compared it to regular plain old plastic picks, the difference was night and day. I broke my red bear though... I have a little key chain pick holder and broke it in the cold while I was tobogganing and fell on it.....[ ]....
Ah yes, "the thrilling days of yesteryear", as they apply to making music on stringed instruments, would be enough to make a conservationist cringe in horror and revulsion. What with genuine tortoise shell picks, and genuine cat gut strings......

Although, I don't know if they used the turtle picks and the catgut strings together. I guess it's not as bad if you only use one at a time.
stepchildusmc
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2011
413 IQ
#7
hmm... .75 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm Gravity picks usually. Chris hand makes some really nice picks short of Blue Chips. plus Dunlop tortex's when friends come over so my $6 picks don't keep disappearing. bad enough that i can NEVER find the clear .75mm's when i drop them on the floor.
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
288 IQ
#8
Quote by stepchildusmc
hmm... .75 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm Gravity picks usually. Chris hand makes some really nice picks short of Blue Chips. plus Dunlop tortex's when friends come over so my $6 picks don't keep disappearing. bad enough that i can NEVER find the clear .75mm's when i drop them on the floor.
You're trying to tell us you don't have a scope laying around?
stepchildusmc
Registered User
Join date: Jul 2011
413 IQ
#9
Quote by Captaincranky
You're trying to tell us you don't have a scope laying around?

ACOG's apprently are frowned upon in the music world...and by my neighbors
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
bigginge
Registered User
Join date: Jun 2008
210 IQ
#10
The 1mm green ones the local guitar shop sells. It's totally irrational I'm sure but I swear they sound better than the red or blue ones, which I keep for spares.
Bikewer
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2010
65 IQ
#11
It's one of those questions.... Ask 100 players and you'll get a hundred answers.

Lot depends on if you're mostly strumming (generally lighter picks) or playing fast, single-note lines. (generally heavier)

I flatpick mostly in a bluegrass style, with "boom-chicka-boom" rhythm punctuated by single-string runs and solos.
I use the standard Dunlop nylon picks in .88 mm. They are stiff enough for single-note playing even on the bass strings, have a sharper point for a nice "ringing" bluegrass sound, and are dead cheap and readily available.
And they last forever.