#1
I had a quick question. Would it be okay to string a 6 string guitar with a 7 string guitar strings not using the bottom E string. I play rhythm so I usually dont use the bottom string as much as i would use a deep B. I wanted see how a seven string sounded before I purchased one. What do you think?
#2
Yes. That is a good way to get thick strings when availability of thick 6 string sets is low.

ESP LTD F-50 + Tonezone
Cort EVL-Z4 + X2N
Cort EVL-K47B

Marshall Valvestate 8100
Randall RG1503
Bugera 333
Peavey Rockmaster preamp

Line6 Pod X3
#3
Yeah you could do this. I would recommend having some decent pickups just because of the new low frequencies. Low end or mid range six string pickups may generate a very muddy tone. Of course, maybe that's what you are looking for.
#4
Yes.

Just so you know, the highest string is called the "top string", not the bottom string. Your terminology is backwards (as is the string order from the way you look at it).
Spin 'round carousel when your horse isn't screwed in.

My band:
Fractured Instinct
(For fans of Death/Groove/Prog Metal)

Ibanez RGA42E
Ibanez S420
LTD H-301
Ibanez RG520
Peavey Predator USA
Douglas Grendel 725
Line 6 Pod HD500X
#5
Quote by Bwett17
I had a quick question. Would it be okay to string a 6 string guitar with a 7 string guitar strings not using the bottom E string. I play rhythm so I usually dont use the bottom string as much as i would use a deep B. I wanted see how a seven string sounded before I purchased one. What do you think?



There can be issues with simply restringing.

First, it's unnecessary -- 7-string will sound very much like your 6-string, except for the B string. Second, you'll usually find that a *good* 7-string will have a longer scale than the usual 6-string, to make the lower strings sound more distinct from one other. If you have a relatively short scale now (24.75", for example), a simple restring will sound pretty muddy. You're effectively converting your guitar into a baritone, most of which have 27" and 28" scales. Third, it's possible that your guitar's action will change, particularly at the nut, since your nut slots should have been cut specifically for the usual string gauges you use for a six. Fourth, the string tension on the guitar will change, and you might introduce string buzzing. Fifth, the intonation on the guitar may change. And finally, the shape of a 7-string's neck is different. For starters, it'll be one string wider. If you've been used to playing with a thumb flopped over the neck, you'll probably find that a bit more difficult, and you'll likely want to modify your technique. And with the longer scale, you'll have differences in the distances that your fingers will travel to find a note.

In short, you're unlikely to learn much about a 7-string and how it plays and sounds by simply changing the strings on your current guitar.