#1
I joined a school jazz band as a guitarist a few weeks ago. I've used sheet music before playing other instruments, but this one thing seems like a foreign language to me. So I know all the root (right word?) chords, but I cannot for the life of me read anything after. Now I know what you'll say, learn music theory. Don't be that guy. I'm working on theory, but I need to be able to learn this very soon. Are there any resources or at least explainable ways to read this stuff? Oh and I can read the notes on the fretboard, that isn't a problem.

#2
I'm afraid you have to be abit more specific with what you don't understand. If i were to interpret you the way you phrased your question now i would assume you understand all the chords except Bb9/D and Bb6/F, cause those are the only chords that are not in their "root position".

What is giving you problems? If i know what is troubling you, i can help you much more easily.

Best Regards
Sickz
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#3
Quote by goochlord
I joined a school jazz band as a guitarist a few weeks ago. I've used sheet music before playing other instruments, but this one thing seems like a foreign language to me. So I know all the root (right word?) chords, but I cannot for the life of me read anything after. Now I know what you'll say, learn music theory. Don't be that guy. I'm working on theory, but I need to be able to learn this very soon. Are there any resources or at least explainable ways to read this stuff? Oh and I can read the notes on the fretboard, that isn't a problem.



G+7(b9) = G augmented 7 with an added flat ninth(Ab). In Jazz augmented 7ths the 7th's tend to be minor 7th's which turns the chord into a G7(b9 b13). Try the major and minor 7ths, but since it moves toward it's tonic it would probably be a minor 7th

In Slash chords the bass player plays the root.
The little circle means diminished chords.
Gmi means G minor.
Bb6 is a Bb major triad with added 6th. Bb D F G.
#4
Quote by Sickz
I'm afraid you have to be abit more specific with what you don't understand. If i were to interpret you the way you phrased your question now i would assume you understand all the chords except Bb9/D and Bb6/F, cause those are the only chords that are not in their "root position".

What is giving you problems? If i know what is troubling you, i can help you much more easily.

Best Regards
Sickz


Well when I say root, to my understanding it is the base G chord in one that says GMin7. I know the B chord, the G chord, the C chord, etc. But I cannot read the stuff after them, for example, G+7 (b9), or F9, or CMin7. The stuff after the chord letter is incomprehensible to me. Thanks :]
#5
G+7(b9) = G augmented 7 with an added flat ninth(Ab). In Jazz augmented 7ths the 7th's tend to be minor 7th's which turns the chord into a G7(b9 b13). Try the major and minor 7ths, but since it moves toward it's tonic it would probably be a minor 7th


Absolutely no clue what any of this means

In Slash chords the bass player plays the root.


Is the root considered the note in front of the slash?
#6
What that means is that you add these certain intervalls to the chord. (intervalls are notes determined from the distance from the root)

Deadds explanation is a good one, but since i get the feeling you want more in order to understand i recommend you check out the site "Musictheory.net". It has lessons regarding intervalls and chord construction, those would benefit you a lot. I know this is somewhat in line with "learn theory", but it's hard to explain it in a way that makes sense without having the knowledge of how it works.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#7
I'm going to be that guy. Learn theory.
These chord extensions are pretty common in jazz and if you need to ask your jazz instructor for help, he/she will be able to teach these concepts in the context of what you need to do in the jazz band.
#8
Quote by Sickz
What that means is that you add these certain intervalls to the chord. (intervalls are notes determined from the distance from the root)

Deadds explanation is a good one, but since i get the feeling you want more in order to understand i recommend you check out the site "Musictheory.net". It has lessons regarding intervalls and chord construction, those would benefit you a lot. I know this is somewhat in line with "learn theory", but it's hard to explain it in a way that makes sense without having the knowledge of how it works.


Alright thanks for the link. It is "learn theory", but that's perfectly ok, I guess I was just hoping there'd be an easier way or something to understand it short-term. I will start looking into it hardcore this week, Thanks both of you
#9
Googling the chords would be faster than trying to figure it out yourself, but in the big picture there's really no shortcut, you'll need to work on music theory.
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#11
once you know your intervals it becomes a lot easier. just takes practice, really.

a good start would be to know where your 3rd, 5th, and 7th is at all times, above and below, from a given root. if you can get positions down on all your triads and 7th chords in different voicings, augmentations and extensions are usually just a small adjustment from the "base" chord.

keep in mind as well that a lot of the time you won't be playing the root or even the fifth because the bass will be covering that in a typical school jazz band. you're mostly just playing 3-4 notes at a time rather than a full cluster, so you can be inventive with your voicings and experiment instead of trying to do crazy stretches to hit notes that are gonna be redundant in a full-band context
#12
Jazz chords Yay!

Two ways to go:

1. Know theory and harmony really well and know every note on the fretboard by name. Build the chords as you go, keyboard style.

2. Know the CAGED system and learn the chord shapes or inversions for each chord variation. (my way). There is an app for that now. Once you know the shapes you can transpose them to any key by simply changing position. When you get a new chart, fish around a bit to find the inversions that work well together for minimal hand movement. I like to make notes on the chart to remind me which positions work well because you can play a "Bb7dim" in about 9 different places on the neck with 5 different shapes.
https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/matt-warnock-guitar-251-chords/id566620334?mt=8

https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.alkalinelabs.learnguitarchords.advanced

I played in HS and college jazz band on guitar many moons ago. You may want to take jazz guitar lessons concurrently with jazz band so you can work on chord shapes and voicings with your guitar teacher. A band director usually expects a player to sight read the chart and then clean up the rough edges at home.

I still play with some jazz cats periodically and the charts move pretty fast. Good luck!
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Mar 11, 2014,
#13
There is a Mel Bay book -http://www.amazon.com/Mel-Jazz-Guitar-Photo-Chords/dp/0786674571

if you need a fast and dirty resource.

Another would be find a former player that was in your slot and get their advice. Third would be get a coach - a good one can get you the essentials to survive Jazz charts like this.

Best,

Sean
#14
It sounds like your problem is you havnt played an instrument that can play more than one note at a time.

All you need at the moment is to know scales, or even better, intervals, and chord construction.

major chords use the root/third/5th, so in G, its G/B/D, the first, third, and fifth notes in the scale, for minor chords, you flat the 3rd, so G/Bb/D, the letters after G, or whatever else, are changes to that basic chord, you start with Gmaj, or Gmin, and then + means augmented 5th, you sharp the 5th, etc, 13 means add the 6th, you subtract 7... to get the actual note if its complicated, for instance, an Amaj9, has the 2 note, which is a B, A/B/C#/E.

sometimes youll see a degree sign, thats diminished, sus4 means add the 4th etc. It seems as if you havnt played much guitar, so itll be a rough start, but the kind of "theory" your after you can learn in a weekend no problem. Chord construction, Intervals/Major Scale, and you'll be off to the races, ofc with jazzy kind of chords you're probably looking at some pretty unusual fingerings, and some physical challenges as well.

/e thought id edit this, slash chords mean you play that note as the bottom note, or root of the chord, even though its really the 3rd or whatever. Also you'll find in any chord construction table all the scale notes you'll need to add, but they dont generally tell you what you can subtract. If you have trouble with certain fingerings etc, many times you can drop the 5th, or the 3rd, sometimes you can drop the root.. I just mean that some of those jazzy chords, you can find a note on each string to play, but you dont really need to, most of the chords theres only 2 or 3 "important" notes, the rest are sort of implied.
Last edited by blunderwonder at Mar 11, 2014,