#1
Okay so I got a new Ibanez (nothing too expensive $300) to practice on. Well my first set of problems was that it wasen't set up right at all and I didn't want to make it worse so I took it into my local music store for them to fix it and install the tremolo bar. I came back and they fixed all the problems except when the guy was fixing a spring is slashed the back of the guitar so there was about a 3 inch scratch, but they filled it in and patched it the best they could so they said they would order the same exact model and they would trade me when it came in. So I came back home with the guitar and it was tuned perfectly in standard. But I play a lot of music in drop d and drop c so I tuned it down to drop d. No problem. The top string was fine when I dropped it. But then I tried to tune it to Drop C (CGCFAD) and the top two strings were fine but then when I tried to drop the rest they just stayed at the same pitch. I thought maybe its because I had new string put on it but I don't really know. I put it back in standard and tried tightening the strings but the last four strings just don't change pitch. I'm pretty sure that scratch on the back dosen't have anything to do with it but hey anythings possible I guess since I don't know much about what affects what on guitars. So anyways i'm gonna take it back tomorrow and tell them the problem. If you have any suggestions please share.
"One good thing about music, when it hits you, you feel no pain."- Bob Marley
#2
Does it have a floyd rose or something? If not, it's the machine heads, make sure they're turning, but since it won't change, I assume not. Could also just be the strings coming loose or something
#3
Does it have a locking nut? If so, you have to loosen the string hold downs before you can change the tuning - I'm guessing that the one lock down was not tight if the pitch changed. I'd have your guitar shop setup it up to whatever tuning you want so you don't have to rebalance the floyd. If you want to constantly change tunings then look into a hard tail / fixed bridge model that doesn't have the tremolo bar. Or learn how to setup a floyd!
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#4
When you tune one string down, your other strings will go up if you have a tremolo bridge. That's because tuning down makes the bridge move. The overall string tension decreases and that makes the bridge tilt backwards which raises the tuning of the other strings. I would suggest changing to heavier strings (you'll need them for lower tunings - they'll feel a lot better). You could also block your tremolo. But yeah, you'll need heavier strings for lower tunings.

Also, did you open the locking nut (considering that your guitar has a Floyd Rose style bridge)?
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#5
Quote by MaggaraMarine

Also, did you open the locking nut (considering that your guitar has a Floyd Rose style bridge)?


+1
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#6
Okay I didn't realize I had a Floyd Rose bridge and that tremolo bar is one of the problems. But yeah i'm going to trade it in at guitar center and try to get a different guitar. What guitar should I get so I can change my tunings when I want? (Drop D, Drop C.)
"One good thing about music, when it hits you, you feel no pain."- Bob Marley
#7
Anything that has a fixed bridge, no tremolo.

Ibanez has a fixed bridge version of pretty much all of their guitars.

What model do you have now? RG320, RG370? Or is it a Gio?
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#8
Quote by JacobyDB
Okay I didn't realize I had a Floyd Rose bridge and that tremolo bar is one of the problems. But yeah i'm going to trade it in at guitar center and try to get a different guitar. What guitar should I get so I can change my tunings when I want? (Drop D, Drop C.)
Or you could learn how to set up your guitar properly. Which you should learn anyway.

Also, it's not really a good idea to be changing guitar tunings constantly. Depending on the guitar, you could eventually cause the neck to warp. Regardless of what you actually do, you really NEED to learn how to set your guitar up properly, since you'll save tons of money doing it yourself in the long run. Since you have a FR-equipped guitar, changing tunings constantly is even worse. Pick a tuning (Drop D, Drop C, E standard, whatever)...and stick with it. Learn how to transpose songs that aren't in the tuning you choose; it's not hard, even.

Anyway...

Try these threads, before you decide to go trade in your guitar:
Guitar Setup Thread
Floyd Rose Setup Guide
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Mar 16, 2014,
#9
Do you have two guitars? If you are changing between two tunings, have one guitar in drop D and the other in drop C. I wouldn't be that afraid of harming my guitar by changing tunings. But drop C would just feel bad with the same strings as drop D. Drop C needs heavier strings. For example if you use 9-42 set in drop D, it will feel pretty loose in drop C.

Do you need a whammy bar? If not, don't buy a guitar with one. It will always make things more difficult.

Oh, and when you play songs in different tunings, do you use a backing track or do you just play alone? If you just play alone, it doesn't matter if you are in drop D or drop C. I never really change my tuning when I play songs in standard, Eb or D tuning. I play everything in the same tuning with the original fingerings. Of course a drop D song won't work with standard tuning (if I play it with the original fingerings) but a drop C song will work in drop D.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Mar 16, 2014,
#10
Quote by JacobyDB
Okay I didn't realize I had a Floyd Rose bridge and that tremolo bar is one of the problems. But yeah i'm going to trade it in at guitar center and try to get a different guitar. What guitar should I get so I can change my tunings when I want? (Drop D, Drop C.)


Where in Iowa?

Here's the deal. Traditionally, alternate tunings were done pretty much one per guitar, unless the change was just a string or two and a step or two. The guitarist would devote a single guitar to a single tuning, select the proper strings to produce even tension across the entire neck. The Goo Goo Dolls use a ton of different tunings, but they also have racks of guitars on stage.

If you take a guitar in standard tuning and simply change the tensions to another tuning, you produce floppy strings or you produce cheese-cutter strings that are so tight you can't bend them. Sometimes both. Worse, when you change tunings, your intonation will often be off. When you change to thicker strings (as is often the case) than your guitar was set up for in the beginning, you need to get your nut slots recut. And once you do that, you need to have a different nut installed if you ever go back to the original string gauge.

In short, "change my tunings when I want" doesn't work optimally, even with fixed-bridge guitars.

With one exception.

A Variax guitar can set up alternate tunings on each string as much as an octave in each direction. The string tension never actually changes. A set of piezo saddles in the bridge feeds the Variax electronics, which uses pitch replacement technology to output the new tuning. The only weird thing is that if you listen to the guitar acoustically, you won't hear the new tuning, but if you put on a set of headphones (or listen through the amp), you'll hear the new tuning. There are preset tunings (on the 89F, there are a lot of factory drop tunings down to Drop Bb and Baritone), you can set other tunings on the fly or preset them using computer editing software.



I got lazy. I decided that the whole business of retuning a guitar or setting up different guitars with different string sets was a pain. So I bought a JTV-89F. I get to have a Floyd (you've already found out this does NOT automatically mix with easy retuning) and I get to have pretty much any tuning out there.

Last edited by dspellman at Mar 16, 2014,
#11
I could never fux with the floyd rose with drop tuned stuff, makes no sense if you wanna keep that low note quacking and stable, you shouldnt have it floating. Thats why for my drop stuff i always use that new Jericho bartione, the black one that The Architects use. Its like a baritone but you can string it up 01-52 for Drop C, sounds great, i think its designed for recording heavy tracks as layers but for me i just play live. I tried Drop G the other day with some heavier strings, never left tuning it was killer. Anyway, Ibanez can suck my balls with that Indonesian bs, maybe if i played in steal panther. Have you guys ever fuxed with 1meg pots?