#1
Hi, I was playing a fender squier for about an year and the more I played with it, the more I experienced injuries in spite for making changes to my technique and posture. Now, I ditched the Squier for a cheap acoustic guitar as the squier always managed to convince me that whatever I played sounded horrendous. Now, with the acoustic I am experiencing no injuries and whatever I player sounds so much better. I am just wondering if its solely due to the neck or is just squier that terrible a guitar?
#2
Terrible guitar. Also, your hands could indeed be to big for the 'thinner' necks. Although I am not sure if Squire really counts as 'thin'.

Edit: Try a Gibson
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#3
Quote by unnamedplayer
Terrible guitar. Also, your hands could indeed be to big for the 'thinner' necks. Although I am not sure if Squire really counts as 'thin'.

Edit: Try a Gibson

Ya, I have already decided to check out Epi Lp models as I cannot afford Gibson. Yes, my hands are huge as I can easily palm a basketball . Always felt Squier was not wide or thick enough .
#4
I think the same thing is happening to me. When I was younger, I had smaller hands so playing thin necks didn't really bother me. Today I have my LTD F-250 which has a pretty thin neck, when holding power chords, my hand gets those really sharp cramps, and it stop right after I release it. I don't know if this is due to bad technique or simply because of the shape of the neck, when I play my first guitar, which has a thicker neck, it doesn't hurt as much as it does with my F-250.

What confuses me is that my hands aren't that big at all, in fact they are rather small
#5
Thick necks have done wonders for my hands. Trade your skinny necks; use nothing thinner than a 70s Gibson neck (similar to fat Schecter necks.). If you really want to loosen up your hands get a 5-string bass with a fat neck and use your pinky a lot. It’s a wonderful workout.
#6
Quote by EvanBrosky
I think the same thing is happening to me. When I was younger, I had smaller hands so playing thin necks didn't really bother me. Today I have my LTD F-250 which has a pretty thin neck, when holding power chords, my hand gets those really sharp cramps, and it stop right after I release it. I don't know if this is due to bad technique or simply because of the shape of the neck, when I play my first guitar, which has a thicker neck, it doesn't hurt as much as it does with my F-250.

What confuses me is that my hands aren't that big at all, in fact they are rather small

For me wearing the guitar higher and holding the guitar in a classical position while sitting did wonders!
Quote by jpnyc
Thick necks have done wonders for my hands. Trade your skinny necks; use nothing thinner than a 70s Gibson neck (similar to fat Schecter necks.). If you really want to loosen up your hands get a 5-string bass with a fat neck and use your pinky a lot. It’s a wonderful workout.

Ya after playing in a few local stores today I have realized fat ones are really suitable for me. My hands feel so much better.
#7
I've found that it's sort of the opposite -- if you have large, strong hands, and a more classical hand position (thumb in the back of the neck rather than wrapped, with a rounded fretting hand rather than one that flattens out), a thin neck works very well. I have XXL paws and love thin, flat necks.

Rounded (and especially chunky 50's style necks) seem to actually work better for those with smaller/weaker/arthritic hands. That's not a put-down, but a reflection of a different style that usually involves wrapping the thumb and/or using the palm of the hand near the thumb to bring more forearm muscles into play for better leverage. The same style would usually cramp up the hands (especially that big muscle in the palm at the base of the thumb) of the same people if they switched to a thinner neck.

There's also this -- if you play with your guitar slung horizontally down around your groin, you're far more likely to develop hand cramps than those people who play with their guitars high and tight at a 45 degree angle.
Last edited by dspellman at Mar 12, 2014,
#8
I played guitar for several years no issues with hand/forearm pain. I purchased an ibanez prestige last year with a thin wizard neck. Within 3 months of heavy play I developed major hand and forearm pain. My doctor informed me it was mild carpal tunnel syndrome. I had previously read about others developing hand pains from thin necks.

I sold the ibanez, and went back to a meatier neck of a les Paul/prs. Within the next 3 months I was completely better. I also slept in a wrist brace for a couple months.

I'll never buy another thin neck again. I love them, but they hurt.
#9
Quote by Starcounter1
I played guitar for several years no issues with hand/forearm pain. I purchased an ibanez prestige last year with a thin wizard neck. Within 3 months of heavy play I developed major hand and forearm pain. My doctor informed me it was mild carpal tunnel syndrome. I had previously read about others developing hand pains from thin necks.

I sold the ibanez, and went back to a meatier neck of a les Paul/prs. Within the next 3 months I was completely better. I also slept in a wrist brace for a couple months.

I'll never buy another thin neck again. I love them, but they hurt.

Ya man, thankfully I stopped playing my squier at the right time so it did not cause me any permanent injury.
#10
Quote by dspellman
I've found that it's sort of the opposite -- if you have large, strong hands, and a more classical hand position (thumb in the back of the neck rather than wrapped, with a rounded fretting hand rather than one that flattens out), a thin neck works very well. I have XXL paws and love thin, flat necks.

Rounded (and especially chunky 50's style necks) seem to actually work better for those with smaller/weaker/arthritic hands. That's not a put-down, but a reflection of a different style that usually involves wrapping the thumb and/or using the palm of the hand near the thumb to bring more forearm muscles into play for better leverage. The same style would usually cramp up the hands (especially that big muscle in the palm at the base of the thumb) of the same people if they switched to a thinner neck.

There's also this -- if you play with your guitar slung horizontally down around your groin, you're far more likely to develop hand cramps than those people who play with their guitars high and tight at a 45 degree angle.

With thin neck I always found myself involuntarily applying too much pressure with my thumb, so with some conscious effort I eased the pressure I was applying with my thumb and the pain reduced considerably. After switching to thicker neck and with a classical positioning of my fretting hand I have realized this position enables me to stretch a lot more and it requires so much less pressure to press down the strings to get the notes to sound. It's jus very comfortable for me now. To each their own I guess
#11
Quote by sundar334
With thin neck I always found myself involuntarily applying too much pressure with my thumb, so with some conscious effort I eased the pressure I was applying with my thumb and the pain reduced considerably. After switching to thicker neck and with a classical positioning of my fretting hand I have realized this position enables me to stretch a lot more and it requires so much less pressure to press down the strings to get the notes to sound. It's jus very comfortable for me now. To each their own I guess


Yup. The folks that play with a sort of "sock puppet" position on their hands/thumbs and especially those who put a lot of pressure on their thumbs will absolutely hate thin necks.Those who spend most of their playing time with the first digit of the thumb hanging over the fretboard from behind the neck will also have problems.

In the end, whatever's most comfortable and still allows you to do everything you want to do on the neck is best.
#12
There's no relation to neck size and hand size.

Everyone is different and has different comfort preferences. That's all.

Find what's comfortable to you. That's all there is to it.
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