#1
Hi guys. Today I changed my guitar strings, but I decided to take them all out, as I wanted to give the fretboard and body a proper cleaning. After putting new strings on, stretching them a lot and finally getting them in tune, I noticed a buzz coming from the frets (around the first couple of frets). I've never had this problem before.

I messed around for like an hour taking the bridge up and down, and no matter how high the strings were (even up to an unplayable point), I would always get a buzz coming from the frets. Is it possible that due to taking all of the strings at once, something happened to the neck? Do you think it needs a rod adjustment?
#2
Never known an issue when changing the strings, I am sure that everyone takes them all off at the same time. Put a capo on the third fret and then press each string at the first fret, there should be some movement, if they are touching the 1st or second fret then it could point to an issue with nut. Did you clean the nut when you had the strings off?
#3
Did you change string gauges or tuning? Measure the relief by fretting (or capo preferably) the first fret and last fret. How much room do you have between the middle fret and low e?
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#4
I didn't clean the nut (...I forgot). When I press the 6th first and last frets, there's more room than usual but this might be because my action is quite high right now (as I told you, I tried to raise the bridge to check if the buzz would stop). I'm really confused about this. I didn't change either the tuning or the string gauge
Last edited by GMx at Mar 12, 2014,
#5
Leave it a couple of hrs, maybe it bowed more when you took off the strings, it can take a while to re settle. Sounds like it could use a 1/4 turn clockwise though...

also if it's a bolt on, check it's tight
Last edited by Tempoe at Mar 12, 2014,
#6
I left the strings tuned and went to sleep last night. I woke up half an hour ago and I've been trying the guitar out since then, it still buzzes. I tried laying it on a table to check the neck's strightness and the upper part of the body wouldn't touch the surface, as the headstock would touch the surface first. Is this normal? I know that most of Gibson LP have their neck in an angle towards the body but mine doesn't.

(I really appreciate you guys taking the time to help, I can't really afford a luthier at the moment).

UPDATE: I tried turning the rod a bit. Clockwise. I gave it a few turns and the buzz was still there. I waited, turned again, then the low E started to buzz either when played open or fretting at almost every fret. So I turned the rod back :|
Last edited by GMx at Mar 12, 2014,
#7
Please somebody help me I have no means to take the guitar to a tech and I can't play since last night.
#8
post a few pic's of the neck so we can see what is going on
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MXR Smart Gate
#9
What kind of guitar is it?

Also, when you play the guitar through an amp does the buzz come through the amplifier? If so, then an adjustment in order. Many players, myself included, aren't concerned with a little buzz unless there's an issue with it coming through the amp. Others are more picky when it comes to buzzing and want zero buzz whatsoever. It's a matter of preference.

If the buzz is so bad that it's totally killing notes or coming through the amp, then yes, you need an adjustment.
Quote by Zeppelin71
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#10
Alright, look at mah horse










Let me know if you need a different angle or something.

(Sorry the pictures are so big, I uploaded them to tumblr in a hurry so I could show you... But they kept the original size)
Last edited by GMx at Mar 12, 2014,
#11
From looking at the first picture, it appears your bridge may be up too high. Look how drastic the difference between the strings at the first fret and last fret.

Post a picture or two of the bridge, as is. Side angles.
Quote by Zeppelin71
Umm. . .uh. . .your mom touched sjones' dick. YOUR MOM TOUCHED OUR GUITARISTS GENITALS IN A CAMPER AT A BIKER FESTIVAL! truth.
#12
Quote by sjones
What kind of guitar is it?

Also, when you play the guitar through an amp does the buzz come through the amplifier? If so, then an adjustment in order. Many players, myself included, aren't concerned with a little buzz unless there's an issue with it coming through the amp. Others are more picky when it comes to buzzing and want zero buzz whatsoever. It's a matter of preference.

If the buzz is so bad that it's totally killing notes or coming through the amp, then yes, you need an adjustment.


The buzz is not coming through the amp, I don't feel like it's killing the notes, but it kinda does when I play unplugged (like 80% of the times).

Quote by sjones
From looking at the first picture, it appears your bridge may be up too high. Look how drastic the difference between the strings at the first fret and last fret.

Post a picture or two of the bridge, as is. Side angles.


The action is REALLY high right now because I've been trying raising it and lowering it to see if it killed the buz. If I lower it, it still buzzes, and it actually gets worse.
Last edited by GMx at Mar 12, 2014,
#13
Quote by GMx
The buz is not coming through the amp, I don't feel like it's killing the notes, but it kinda does when I play unplugged (like 80% of the times). Also, if you look at the pics I just posted, the string action is REALLY high right now and it's really uncomfortable to play right now. If I lower it, the buzz gets worse.

See my above post about the bridge height.

Keep in mind that if you're a heavy picker you're more likely to get buzz.
Quote by Zeppelin71
Umm. . .uh. . .your mom touched sjones' dick. YOUR MOM TOUCHED OUR GUITARISTS GENITALS IN A CAMPER AT A BIKER FESTIVAL! truth.
#14
I am aware that strings can buzz if you hit them hard. But I never had buzz coming from the frets before. Ever. This is not the first time I either change strings or lower/raise the action.

I edited my previous post to answer to your post about the bridge. This is how I looked at while ago:



(This pic turned itself to the left when uploaded)


I tried lowering the bridge as I normally have it and all of the strings buzz when played open. Before, it was just the 5th and 4th strings buzzing.
#15
Action has nothing to do with checking relief. When you fret 1st and last fret you are making a straight line with the string and that's the reference point for neck relief
Guitars:
Jackson Kelly KE3 - MIJ (Distortion/Jazz)
Jackson DKMGT Dinky (EMG 81/85)
ESP E-II Eclipse Custom (JB/'59)
ESP LTD EC-1001FR (EMG 81/60)
Fender MIM Strat

Amps:
Mesa/Boogie Dual Rectifier Roadster 212
Laney IronHeart IRT-Studio
Peavey Vypyr 30
Peavey ReValver Amp Sims
TOOOO many T.C. Electronic Pedals. . .
#16
Quote by metalmingee
When you fret 1st and last fret you are making a straight line with the string and that's the reference point for neck relief


Meaning what? Do I need to loosen the rod? They make a perfect straight line (1st and 24th frets).
#17
Quote by GMx


UPDATE: I tried turning the rod a bit. Clockwise. I gave it a few turns and the buz was still there. I waited, turned again, then the low E started to buz either when played open or fretting at almost every fret. So I turned the rod back :|


Whoa, whoa. Hold on here.

When you turn the rod you give the wood a few days to settle. This isn't putty, dude. It's a steel rod inside a wooden neck. Don't just start turning left and right back and forth. This is how damage is done.

Turn it no more than 1/4th to 1/8th at a time and then leave it alone for a few days. See if that helps.
ayy lmao
#18
Quote by chookiecookie
Whoa, whoa. Hold on here.

When you turn the rod you give the wood a few days to settle. This isn't putty, dude. It's a steel rod inside a wooden neck. Don't just start turning left and right back and forth. This is how damage is done.

Turn it no more than 1/4th to 1/8th at a time and then leave it alone for a few days. See if that helps.


I understand that it's a procedure that should be done carefully, and that its effects can take a while. But as I said before, a couple of minutes after doing it the first time, the buzz got worse. I didn't spin it violently nor did I turned the rod back immediately, but if I do try adjusting it again, do you think that leaving it a couple of days might help the neck go back to a playable state again? (assuming of course, that this a neck problem). And, if I do so, should I loosen the strings?

I'm really angry that I just wanted to change my freaking strings and now the guitar's unplayable...
Last edited by GMx at Mar 12, 2014,
#19
If you don't know what you're doing, you should just take it to a tech.
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#20
Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
If you don't know what you're doing, you should just take it to a tech.


Thanks for the suggestion, but unfortunately, due to a lot of circumstances, I can't take the guitar to a tech, that's why I'm asking people from a forum for guidance and not a professional.
#21
Quote by GMx
but if I do try adjusting it again, do you think that leaving it a couple of days might help the neck go back to a playable state again?


Yes.

It will have a slight effect immediately but it will take a while for the wood to settle
ayy lmao
#22
Quote by chookiecookie
Yes.

It will have a slight effect immediately but it will take a while for the wood to settle


I'm going to send you a PM so we don't flood the thread.
#23
Quote by GMx
I'm going to send you a PM so we don't flood the thread.


Whoa, sorry. I forgot about this thread after jumping around a bit.

I just replied to your pm.
ayy lmao
#24
you set up neck relief before messing with bridge height. You can follow this setup guide, especially step 4.If you put lighter strings on than what was on before, your neck would have less relief causing fret buzz. as the guide says, the relief should be about
http://www.samash.com/opncms/opencms/samash/library/main/How_to_Set_Up_an_Electric_Guitar.html


I wouldn't take it to a luthier either unless it was a really $$ guitar. The probability of you destroying your guitar X cost, is less than cost of luthier imo.
#25
Quote by bob13bob
you set up neck relief before messing with bridge height. You can follow this setup guide, especially step 4.If you put lighter strings on than what was on before, your neck would have less relief causing fret buzz. as the guide says, the relief should be about
http://www.samash.com/opncms/opencms/samash/library/main/How_to_Set_Up_an_Electric_Guitar.html


I wouldn't take it to a luthier either unless it was a really $$ guitar. The probability of you destroying your guitar X cost, is less than cost of luthier imo.



I checked that page (thank you for pointing me there), and it also talks about relieving the neck. Following chookiecookie's advice, I gave the rod a subtle twirl to loosen it, and left the guitar untouched since wednesday in the afternoon until today, so the neck would "settle", but it's still the same. When I press the 6th string on 1st and 17th frets, I have vistually no space between the string and the metal bars.

It's not an expensive guitar, actually, but as soon as I can, I'll take it to a luthier, because I can't seem to fix this issue myself.
#26
I hope you find a solution. For the future though, I read that some guitarists like to remove and replace one string at a time so that they do not completely remove the tension on the neck. Good luck!
"You're an individual and so are all of these guitars – it's really difficult for somebody else to tell you what's going to be right for you." - Revenge of the Naked Ape
#27
Quote by GMx
I checked that page (thank you for pointing me there), and it also talks about relieving the neck. Following chookiecookie's advice, I gave the rod a subtle twirl to loosen it, and left the guitar untouched since wednesday in the afternoon until today, so the neck would "settle", but it's still the same. When I press the 6th string on 1st and 17th frets, I have vistually no space between the string and the metal bars.

It's not an expensive guitar, actually, but as soon as I can, I'll take it to a luthier, because I can't seem to fix this issue myself.

Then you need to adjust the truss rod. Turn it counter clockwise. You will notice a difference instantly (I have always noticed a difference instantly when adjusting truss rod). Just don't turn it too much. Turn it 1/4 of a turn at the time.
Quote by AlanHB
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#28
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Then you need to adjust the truss rod. Turn it counter clockwise. You will notice a difference instantly (I have always noticed a difference instantly when adjusting truss rod). Just don't turn it too much. Turn it 1/4 of a turn at the time.


I've already told him the exact same thing, almost word for word.

;_;
ayy lmao
#29
Quote by BluesPowered
I hope you find a solution. For the future though, I read that some guitarists like to remove and replace one string at a time so that they do not completely remove the tension on the neck. Good luck!


Thank you, pal. I ALWAYS do one string at a time and this time I just took them all at once to clean the guitar. I'll never clean that f*cker again.

Quote by MaggaraMarine
Then you need to adjust the truss rod. Turn it counter clockwise. You will notice a difference instantly (I have always noticed a difference instantly when adjusting truss rod). Just don't turn it too much. Turn it 1/4 of a turn at the time.


Quote by chookiecookie
I've already told him the exact same thing, almost word for word.

;_;


Wait a second chookiecookie, you told me counter clockwise, and you also told me that I should give it time. I actually said that I noticed a change instantly the first time I did it clockwise (and it was that the buzzing got worse). I have tried both ways so far and the problem's still there...
#30
Quote by GMx
Thank you, pal. I ALWAYS do one string at a time and this time I just took them all at once to clean the guitar. I'll never clean that f*cker again.


Wait a second chookiecookie, you told me counter clockwise, and you also told me that I should give it time. I actually said that I noticed a change instantly the first time I did it clockwise (and it was that the buzzing got worse). I have tried both ways so far and the problem's still there...

Don't try it both ways. In this case the only right direction to turn it is counter clockwise. 1/4 of a turn may not be enough and you may not notice a big difference. Just don't go crazy with the truss rod and you'll be fine. Remember to check the fret buzz after each 1/4 of a turn.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#31
Agreed with everything so far and I am sure you have already been told this, but loosen the strings and little when adjusting the rod. I have always seen immediate differences in adjusting a truss rod. I just had to adjust my LTD with a 1/8 turn and with immediate differences. Best of luck hope you get this resolved, I understand how frustrating it might be.
Gibson LP traditional and DC standard, PRS S2 Custom 24, Schecter Banshee 7
EVH 5153, Mesa DR Tremoverb combo 2-2x12's
Line 6 M13
#32
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Don't try it both ways. In this case the only right direction to turn it is counter clockwise. 1/4 of a turn may not be enough and you may not notice a big difference. Just don't go crazy with the truss rod and you'll be fine. Remember to check the fret buzz after each 1/4 of a turn.


What I meant was that first tried clockwise, after reading on different forums and websites about neck issues, that was before talking to people here. I honestly can't see the neck curved or concave, so I'm not sure I understand what it needed in the first place. That's why I came here to ask. I always give small turns, but I notice nothing :| I feel like someone just put a little hole in there so I could play guitar tech.


Quote by bobafettacheese
Agreed with everything so far and I am sure you have already been told this, but loosen the strings and little when adjusting the rod. I have always seen immediate differences in adjusting a truss rod. I just had to adjust my LTD with a 1/8 turn and with immediate differences. Best of luck hope you get this resolved, I understand how frustrating it might be.


I do loosen the strings before doing anything to the truss rod, otherwise I can't even reach it properly.

Thanks to you two for your advice. I haven't been able to play guitar since the day I made this post and I am still unable to get it to a tech.
Last edited by GMx at Mar 16, 2014,