#1
Hey guys,

Same old cliché; played for years but never learnt theory. I'm learning out of an old "fast track" book however I've come into an issue.

The book bases itself around position 1 using open strings etc. I've read on the internet that playing open strings is bad whilst learning how to sight read, and that I should start learning in position 5 as it's the most common and the best for least movement etc.

Should I be learning in position 1 like the book asks or in position 5 like the consensus tells me?

Also, are there any things that you guys wished someone told you before you begun your journey to learn theory?

Cheers!
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
#2
Going to double post to add another question:

Do you guys think that sight reading is a necessary skill outside of a formal situation? What I really want out of learning theory is to be able to play jazz. Playing jazz and actually improvising jazz well are my end-game goals. Should I learn both sight reading and music theory or just music theory and keep it all in my head?
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
#3
Well, learning to sight read music isn't going to hurt. Do you think you are ever going to sight read music? Though I think it's a good skill because if you are in a band and they want to play a song that you don't know, you can still play it if they have the sheet music for the song.
Quote by AlanHB
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#4
Yeah, like Maggara said, it depends on the situation.

Do you only play by yourself? Chances are that you won't ever need to sight read.

Do you play in a band(s) and need to learn unknown songs in a short period of time (or on the spot)? Well then you might benefit from knowing how to sight read.
#5
Quote by N_J_B_B
Hey guys,

Same old cliché; played for years but never learnt theory. I'm learning out of an old "fast track" book however I've come into an issue.

The book bases itself around position 1 using open strings etc. I've read on the internet that playing open strings is bad whilst learning how to sight read, and that I should start learning in position 5 as it's the most common and the best for least movement etc.

Should I be learning in position 1 like the book asks or in position 5 like the consensus tells me?

Also, are there any things that you guys wished someone told you before you begun your journey to learn theory?

Which is more comfortable for you? Because, the idea is that you will be given sheet music, and it's not going to say "Play fret X on string A" like tabs do for you. It's going to say play "an A note, then a C note [...]". It's up to YOU, as the performer to decide where on the guitar neck that you play those notes. This idea, of course, ties into sight reading. Because you won't be able to sight read if you can't quickly find a position on the neck that works well to play the notes on the sheet music.
#6
That's an interesting question, about whether to lean in the open position or in, say, the 5th position. If you learn in a position that doesn't use open strings, you'll be able to better see the patternistic nature of the scales that make up the melodies you're playing. It seems to me that could be a better approach--though most of the books I've seen & used start with the open position. Ultimately, it probably doesn't matter that much, since you'll want to be able to do both in the long run.

You can learn a fair amount of theory without learning to read--the structure of scales & chords, chord progressions, etc. And that will get you by in a LOT of situations (short of jazz or classical music). But if you're serious about wanting to play jazz, and you want to get out and jam with actual jazz players, I think it would be tough to do without learning to read.
#7
Quote by Lephty
But if you're serious about wanting to play jazz, and you want to get out and jam with actual jazz players, I think it would be tough to do without learning to read.


</thread>
Anfangen ist leicht, Beharren eine Kunst.
#8
Getting out and jamming with jazz players isnt really applicable.. I usually just jam by myself or occasionally with a couple of mates who don't play jazz (bedroom player, no real interest in joining a band but jamming is cool...).

My real inspiration is watching guys like Reindhart, Pass, Davis, Bentley, and more recently Govan improvising and writing awesome jazz music. I felt like I had no idea where to start so sight-reading would be the obvious direction.

Roc actually posted an interesting thought on this in another thread:

Quote by Roc8995



I used to be able to sight read passably well when I played more jazz. It's just a secret handshake you have to know to play in pit orchestras and some jazz bands, and the only reason it exists there is because it would be more work for composers/arrangers to use a different system for one instrument. It's a good challenge but I'm not sad I lapsed on my sight-reading. It just wasn't productive for me.


Thoughts?
Quote by SlackerBabbath
My ideal woman would be a grossly overweight woman who would happy go jogging, come home all sweaty and let me put my dick under her armpit while she shuffles a pack of cards.

Stay classy, pit.
#9
Quote by N_J_B_B
Hey guys,

Same old cliché; played for years but never learnt theory. I'm learning out of an old "fast track" book however I've come into an issue.

The book bases itself around position 1 using open strings etc. I've read on the internet that playing open strings is bad whilst learning how to sight read, and that I should start learning in position 5 as it's the most common and the best for least movement etc.

Should I be learning in position 1 like the book asks or in position 5 like the consensus tells me?

Also, are there any things that you guys wished someone told you before you begun your journey to learn theory?

Cheers!


Those Fast Tracks are very very basic, and ultimately I don't find them useful at all. You might try to find a book Music Reading for Guitar by David Oakes. Fantastic book. Best ever on the subject in my opinion.

As to your question I wish I'd been advised to learn things slowly and perfectly, rather than feel like I had to push to get things fast.

Best,

Sean
#10
Quote by N_J_B_B
Hey guys,

Same old cliché; played for years but never learnt theory. I'm learning out of an old "fast track" book however I've come into an issue.

The book bases itself around position 1 using open strings etc. I've read on the internet that playing open strings is bad whilst learning how to sight read, and that I should start learning in position 5 as it's the most common and the best for least movement etc.

Should I be learning in position 1 like the book asks or in position 5 like the consensus tells me?


playing on open strings is….."bad"????

no offense but that's one of the dumbest things I've ever heard.

Most books start you in 1st position. It's not in anyway "bad". It's just a logical place to start. Ultimately, it's all stuff you should learn.


Quote by N_J_B_B



Also, are there any things that you guys wished someone told you before you begun your journey to learn theory?

Cheers!


I doesn't do any good to blame other people for not telling you this or that. Just keep learning.
Last edited by GuitarMunky at Mar 13, 2014,
#11
Quote by N_J_B_B
Roc actually posted an interesting thought on this in another thread:

Quote by Roc8995

I used to be able to sight read passably well when I played more jazz. It's just a secret handshake you have to know to play in pit orchestras and some jazz bands, and the only reason it exists there is because it would be more work for composers/arrangers to use a different system for one instrument. It's a good challenge but I'm not sad I lapsed on my sight-reading. It just wasn't productive for me.



Thoughts?

If you don't use it, you lose it. If Roc wasn't playing in situations where he need to sight read, then he had no reason to keep it up. Really all there is to it.