#1
Unless you're going for a highly specific position in research, does it matter what kind of science degree you have.

For example will an employer value a Chemistry degree more highly over a Biochemistry degree, or a Chemical Engineering degree over a Physics degree etc.?

Or do the transferrable skills of maths, statistics, critical thinking, writing reports and general practical competence matter more than whether you know the details of a certain equation vs a certain reaction mechanism?

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
#4
Quote by EndTheRapture51
Unless you're going for a highly specific position in research, does it matter what kind of science degree you have.

For example will an employer value a Chemistry degree more highly over a Biochemistry degree, or a Chemical Engineering degree over a Physics degree etc.?

Or do the transferrable skills of maths, statistics, critical thinking, writing reports and general practical competence matter more than whether you know the details of a certain equation vs a certain reaction mechanism?

The more maths you have, the more masters you can do that have nothing to do with your bachelor. Think it will be the same for jobs.

Most education is for signalling purposes anyway. No employer will ask you some very theoretical mathematical concept.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#5
From experience, yeah. But, like everything, it depends what you want to do, so, that's a maybe no.
#6
Quote by seanlang01
From experience, yeah. But, like everything, it depends what you want to do, so, that's a maybe no.


I mean yeah I doubt if I was applying for a PHD in some highly theoretical physics position with my Chemistry degree that I'd get it, but I think for example a general graduate position in a corporation or a lab job such as technician it wouldn't matter as much would it?

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
#8
Quote by captainsnazz
After seeing some of your posts, I'd say you're definitely not ready for any form of postgrad degree.


I'm about to finish my Masters...

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
#9
It matters in the sense that it tailors what kind of job positions you can show as experience for whatever you're applying to. If you have a biology degree and are limited in the kind of research positions you can apply for after graduating, it may not be as convenient as having a civil engineering degree that could put you in the position of doing more specialized research towards, let's say, geophysics. While both biology and civil engineering are conceptually related to geophysics, and either would be an interesting stepping point for changing disciplines, you'll probably have an easier time finding a steady position with at least a few years of experience available in civil engineering, which gives more weight to your admissions application, especially for a PhD.
Quote by Arthur Curry
it's official, vintage x metal is the saving grace of this board and/or the antichrist




e-married to
theguitarist
minterman22
tateandlyle
& alaskan_ninja

#10
Nah as long as you get a science degree and you can be called a scientist that's all that matters.
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#12
Quote by vintage x metal
It matters in the sense that it tailors what kind of job positions you can show as experience for whatever you're applying to. If you have a biology degree and are limited in the kind of research positions you can apply for after graduating, it may not be as convenient as having a civil engineering degree that could put you in the position of doing more specialized research towards, let's say, geophysics. While both biology and civil engineering are conceptually related to geophysics, and either would be an interesting stepping point for changing disciplines, you'll probably have an easier time finding a steady position with at least a few years of experience available in civil engineering, which gives more weight to your admissions application, especially for a PhD.


Not really planning to do a PhD so I was wondering what the world of jobs is actually like. Recently had a careers talk from former Chemistry students and some had gone into working for Unilever, other as insurance brokers, and others had become DNA analysts.

Quote by captainsnazz
lol seriously I would never have guessed you were any older than 16


Cool, by your posts I guess you're a man in his 50s maybe with a very boring set of hobbies such as stamp collecting and very few friends.

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
#13
Science Degree?

All the cool kids are using Kelvin...
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#14
today's a sour day for UG
Quote by Arthur Curry
it's official, vintage x metal is the saving grace of this board and/or the antichrist




e-married to
theguitarist
minterman22
tateandlyle
& alaskan_ninja

#16
Science is BS
Religion is fact
You hit 'em and they get back up
I hit 'em and they stay down
- Frank Castle
#17
Quote by EndTheRapture51



Cool, by your posts I guess you're a man in his 50s maybe with a very boring set of hobbies such as stamp collecting and very few friends.


I would have thought he and Will were a couple

What are you getting your Masters in?
#18
Quote by vintage x metal
today's a sour day for UG

Luckily we have you here to make it sweeter


Ok I'm not used to being cute.
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#20
Quote by eGraham
Luckily we have you here to make it sweeter


Ok I'm not used to being cute.

daww that was good


now UG is sour AND sweet

Quote by Arthur Curry
it's official, vintage x metal is the saving grace of this board and/or the antichrist




e-married to
theguitarist
minterman22
tateandlyle
& alaskan_ninja

#21
*gets degree in political science*

*looks for job in chemistry*
Most of the important things


in the world have been accomplished


by people who have kept on


trying when there seemed to be no hope at all
#22
Quote by vintage x metal
daww that was good


now UG is sour AND sweet



:3

Just looking at that makes my teeth hurt though
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#23
Quote by chev311e
I would have thought he and Will were a couple

What are you getting your Masters in?


Will has #topbantz though.

Um Chemistry, research project focused on inorganic synthesis. I'm definitely not going into doing a PhD so was thinking of job prospects. Like could I apply for something medicinal/biochem related at a pharmaceutical company or would I be required to have extreme knowledge of a subject beforehand. Basically how specific are graduate employers looking. They may want to take someone raw and train them up to their own standards.

longing rusted furnace daybreak seventeen benign nine homecoming one freight car
#25
Quote by JackWhiteIsButts
Polisci isn't science though


you win the prize
Most of the important things


in the world have been accomplished


by people who have kept on


trying when there seemed to be no hope at all
#26
Quote by JackWhiteIsButts
Polisci isn't science though

Science is defined by method, not subject.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#27
No, Neo! Economics is not allowed to be science!
Quote by Trowzaa
I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#28
Quote by eGraham
No, Neo! Economics is not allowed to be science!

But ... earth sciences is right? It has science in its name.
Quote by Carmel
I can't believe you are whoring yourself out like that.

ಠ_ಠ
#30
Quote by So-Cal
Why are you asking a guitar forum?


Because guitar science.
Most of the important things


in the world have been accomplished


by people who have kept on


trying when there seemed to be no hope at all
#32
Quote by EndTheRapture51
I mean yeah I doubt if I was applying for a PHD in some highly theoretical physics position with my Chemistry degree that I'd get it, but I think for example a general graduate position in a corporation or a lab job such as technician it wouldn't matter as much would it?
No, not at all. If you know your aseptic technique and basic lab practices you're good to go. I'd say if anything, a chemistry degree is a slight advantage for most of those jobs.
#33
Idk just look at job ads and you'll get an idea. Many places here are quite specific about the type of degree because as someone specializing in biomedical science, I have very different skills from someone doing environmental biology, even though they both fall under the biological sciences degree. Transfer of skills is often valued though: I met a rep from a laboratory equipment provider during a career fair and at the time he told me that they were only looking for chemical engineers and refused to take my application. He emailed me a few weeks later though and said that they now wanted someone with a biology background to offer a different perspective on some research they're doing and asked me to apply.

Once you go to non-science specific job areas it's a bit more flexible but there are certain trends. For instance, engineering degrees are nearly always valued more than science degrees, and if you're some type of math/statistics major you will have more options than nearly everyone else.

But I really can't tell you anything about your situation because job markets are different in different regions so just look at the requirements on ads.
cat