#1
http://uquiz.com/ZdxUuE

William Temple



You are William Temple!

William Temple (1881-1944) was a bishop and theologian of the Church of England, who served as Archbishop of Canterbury from 1942-44. He was the son of another Archbishop of Canterbury, Frederick Temple (1821-1902). Temple suffered from severe attacks of gout beginning at the age of two, and developed a cataract in infancy that would leave him blind in one eye by the age of forty. Despite these formidable health difficulties, Temple achieved early intellectual eminence; at Oxford, he earned a double first in classics and served as president of the Oxford Union, the university debating society, where he developed the ability to moderate between parties with apparently intractable differences that would serve him well as bishop. In 1906, he applied for ordination but was refused by the Bishop of Oxford, who felt that Temple fell short of orthodox belief on the virgin birth and the bodily resurrection of Christ. In 1908, he requested an interview with the current Archbishop of Canterbury, Randall Davidson, who determined that Temple's views were unconventional but not actually unorthodox, and decided to ordain Temple himself. Once ordained, Temple rose quickly to prominence in the Church of England, appointed bishop of Manchester in 1921 and Archbishop of York in 1929.

Temple was a prolific author, writing an average of one full-length work every year for the thirty-five years of his ministry. Despite the range of his work, which included essays in Platonic philosophy and commentaries on St John's Gospel, Temple is now remembered primarily as a political theologian. Arguing that the inner life of the church in liturgy and sacraments must lead outward to an engagement with the life of the world, he was a supporter of the early twentieth-century working-class movement and attempted to formulate a theological system that would incorporate the best secular insights of socialism. His best-known work, "Christianity and Social Order," was a bestseller in 1942, balancing a basically optimistic hope for postwar reconstruction with a powerful sense of the reality of original sin and the human capacity for evil. At the height of the Holocaust, Temple joined with England's chief rabbi Joseph Hertz to form the Council of Christians and Jews, urging the British government to take immediate action against Nazi atrocities. A few months before his death, Temple visited the beaches of Normandy during Operation Overlord, making him the first Archbishop of Canterbury to go into battle since the Middle Ages.

Selected list of works:

- Church and Nation (1915)
- Mens Creatrix (1917)
- Fellowship with God (1920)
- Christus Veritas (1924)
- Christianity and the State (1928)
- Nature, Man, and God (1934)
- Readings in St John's Gospel (1939/40)
- Christianity and Social Order (1942)
#2
You are William Ralph Inge!



William Ralph Inge (1860-1954) was an English clergyman most famous for his position as Dean of St Paul's Cathedral from 1911-34. From 1921-46, Inge wrote a regular column for the Evening Standard, a position that allowed him to comment on various political, religious and social issues of the day. His notorious pessimism earned him the title "The Gloomy Dean"; he was critical of any concept of human progress and wrote extensively in favour of eugenics. His primary philosophical and theological interests were in neo-Platonism and the Christian mystical tradition, of which he was one of the first noteworthy British advocates.

Selected list of works:

- Christian Mysticism (1899)
- Faith (1900)
- Studies of English Mystics (1905)
- Truth and Falsehood in Religion (1906)
- Personal Idealism and Mysticism (1906)
- Faith and its Psychology (1909)
- The Church and the Age (1912)
- The Religious Philosophy of Plotinus and Some Modern Philosophies of Religion (1914)
- The Philosophy of Plotinus (1918)
- Outspoken Essays (1919/22)
- The Idea of Progress (1920)
- The Victorian Age (1922)
- Lay Thoughts of a Dean (1926)
- More Lay Thoughts of a Dean (1931)
- Our Present Discontents (1938)
- Mysticism in Religion (1947)
- The End of an Age and Other Essays (1948)


Weird quiz, dunno what its meant to mean.
o()o

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yes every night of my entire life i go to bed crying because i wasnt born american
#4
You are Michael Ramsey!

Arthur Michael Ramsey (1904-1988) was the 100th Archbishop of Canterbury and one of the iconic figures of twentieth-century Anglicanism. Educated at Cuddesdon alongside his friend Austin Farrer, he was strongly influenced there by the Anglo-Catholic movement and by Eastern Orthodox theology. After serving for many years in parish ministry, Ramsey held a brief tenure as Regius Professor of Divinity at Cambridge (1950-52) before his appointment as Bishop of Durham (1952), Archbishop of York (1956), and Archbishop of Canterbury (1961). A passionate ecumenist, Ramsey maintained a friendly relationship with the Orthodox patriarchs of Moscow and Constantinople, and with Pope Paul VI, who in 1966 presented Ramsey with the episcopal ring he had worn as Archbishop of Milan (this ring is still worn by Archbishops of Canterbury when visiting the Vatican). He also supported reunion between the Church of England and the Methodist churches. Ramsey's theological work reflects the influence of Orthodox theology but also engaged with the new theological movements of the day, including the radical theology of John A. T. Robinson and the growing charismatic movement. Perhaps his best-known work is his early study "The Gospel and the Catholic Church," which sets forth an Anglican ecclesiology grounded in the Church's life given by God in Christ.


idk what i clicked
#5
whaaaaaaaa
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I wish I was American.

~ A Rolling Potato Gathers No Moss ~
#6



You are Donald MacKinnon!

Donald Mackenzie MacKinnon (1913-1994) was a Scottish theologian and philosopher, known as much for his influence on his students as for his relatively few published writings. He taught theology at Aberdeen University (1947-60) and at Cambridge (1960-78), where his dominating personality and famously eccentric behaviour made a lasting impact on all who came into contact with him. Although his own churchmanship was distinctly Anglo-Catholic, his wife was a lifelong Presbyterian, a tension that was reflected in Mackinnon's own preoccupation with ecumenical matters: although he held to a "high" view of the Church's mission, he was a vicious critic of Anglican arrogance and exclusion, insisting that the Church must be called to humility in following the self-emptying of Christ. This tension is typical of MacKinnon's thought, which is characterized by a studied refusal to accept tidy answers to difficult theological problems. MacKinnon's primary influences were Continental thinkers, particularly the theological giants Karl Barth and Hans Urs von Balthasar, as well as such philosophers as Kant and Hegel. He published relatively little, and his output consists mostly of brief essays; however, his influence can be seen in the work of such leading figures as the former Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams.

Selected list of works:

-A Study in Ethical Theory (1957)
-Borderlands of Theology and Other Essays (1968)
-The Stripping of the Altars (1969)
-The Problem of Metaphysics (1974)
banned
#7
1. I would never attend a dinner party where the host served eel.
2. This was written by John Cleese wasn't it?
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Yup, a girl went up to me in my fursuit one time.

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I can fap to this. Keep going.
#8
this test wow.
O.K.

“There's never enough time to do all the nothing you want.”
~ Bill Watterson


O__o
#9
John A. T. Robinson

You are John A. T. Robinson!

John Arthur Thomas Robinson (1919-1983) was an Anglican bishop, New Testament scholar, and the author of the famous 1963 book "Honest To God," whose radical attempt to redefine the concept of God stirred up a hornet's nest of controversy. Born into a clerical family (his father was a canon of Canterbury Cathedral), Robinson studied for ordination at Westcott House, Cambridge and was ordained a priest. After working in parish ministry and as a lecturer in divinity at Cambridge University, he was appointed Bishop of Woolwich in 1959. He earned notoriety for his defense of D. H. Lawrence's controversial novel "Lady Chatterly's Lover" and for his own book "Honest to God," a brief work that synthesized and popularized radical ideas from such continental theologians as Rudolf Bultmann, Dietrich Bonhoeffer and Paul Tillich. Arguing that God should be conceptualized existentially as the "ground of all being" (Tillich's phrase) rather than as himself an existent being, Robinson called for a "secular theology" in which God's continuing revelation to humanity would be brought about through the culture at large, rather than specifically through the confines of Christian worship and sacraments. Despite the popularity of "Honest to God," Robinson was himself primarily a New Testament scholar rather than a theologian; his later years were dedicated to a project arguing that the books of the New Testament were written before 65 AD (against the consensus of most Biblical scholarship) and that the Gospel of John was in fact the earliest to be written. "Honest to God" continues to be controversial, hailed by some as an epochal step forward in Christian thought and dismissed by others as wrong-headed and incoherent, but Robinson himself is remembered by those who knew him as a gifted pastor and mentor.

Selected list of works:

- In the End, God (1950)
- Jesus and His Coming (1957)
- Honest to God (1963)
- Christian Morals Today (1964)
- Christian Freedom in a Permissive Society (1970)
- Redating the New Testament (1976)
- The Priority of John (1984)

dirtbag ballet by the bins down the alley
as i walk through the chalet of the shadow of death
everything that you've come to expect


#11


You are Michael Ramsey!

Arthur Michael Ramsey (1904-1988) was the 100th Archbishop of Canterbury and one of the iconic figures of twentieth-century Anglicanism. Educated at Cuddesdon alongside his friend Austin Farrer, he was strongly influenced there by the Anglo-Catholic movement and by Eastern Orthodox theology. After serving for many years in parish ministry, Ramsey held a brief tenure as Regius Professor of Divinity at Cambridge (1950-52) before his appointment as Bishop of Durham (1952), Archbishop of York (1956), and Archbishop of Canterbury (1961). A passionate ecumenist, Ramsey maintained a friendly relationship with the Orthodox patriarchs of Moscow and Constantinople, and with Pope Paul VI, who in 1966 presented Ramsey with the episcopal ring he had worn as Archbishop of Milan (this ring is still worn by Archbishops of Canterbury when visiting the Vatican). He also supported reunion between the Church of England and the Methodist churches. Ramsey's theological work reflects the influence of Orthodox theology but also engaged with the new theological movements of the day, including the radical theology of John A. T. Robinson and the growing charismatic movement. Perhaps his best-known work is his early study "The Gospel and the Catholic Church," which sets forth an Anglican ecclesiology grounded in the Church's life given by God in Christ.

Selected list of works:

- The Gospel and the Catholic Church (1936)
- The Resurrection of Christ (1945)
- The Glory of God and the Transfiguration of Christ (1949)
- F. D. Maurice and the Conflicts of Modern Theology (1951)
- From Gore to Temple (1960)
- God, Christ, and the World (1969)
- The Christian Priest Today (1971)
- Holy Spirit (1977)
- Be Still and Know: A Study in the Life of Prayer (1981)


STOKED.
Last edited by Rossenrot at Mar 13, 2014,
#12
and btw I got some guy named Eric Mascall. Have no clue who he is.
Quote by SomeoneYouKnew
You should be careful what you say. Some asshole will probably sig it.

Quote by Axelfox
Yup, a girl went up to me in my fursuit one time.

Quote by Xiaoxi
I can fap to this. Keep going.
#13
John A T Robinson just like Mr. Twowzuh
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#14
Quote by deadsmileyface



You are Donald MacKinnon!

Donald Mackenzie MacKinnon (1913-1994) was a Scottish theologian and philosopher, known as much for his influence on his students as for his relatively few published writings. He taught theology at Aberdeen University (1947-60) and at Cambridge (1960-78), where his dominating personality and famously eccentric behaviour made a lasting impact on all who came into contact with him. Although his own churchmanship was distinctly Anglo-Catholic, his wife was a lifelong Presbyterian, a tension that was reflected in Mackinnon's own preoccupation with ecumenical matters: although he held to a "high" view of the Church's mission, he was a vicious critic of Anglican arrogance and exclusion, insisting that the Church must be called to humility in following the self-emptying of Christ. This tension is typical of MacKinnon's thought, which is characterized by a studied refusal to accept tidy answers to difficult theological problems. MacKinnon's primary influences were Continental thinkers, particularly the theological giants Karl Barth and Hans Urs von Balthasar, as well as such philosophers as Kant and Hegel. He published relatively little, and his output consists mostly of brief essays; however, his influence can be seen in the work of such leading figures as the former Archbishop of Canterbury, Rowan Williams.

Selected list of works:

-A Study in Ethical Theory (1957)
-Borderlands of Theology and Other Essays (1968)
-The Stripping of the Altars (1969)
-The Problem of Metaphysics (1974)

This
#15
This quiz is actually really funny
There's only one boss I listen to, and that's why I'm unemployed.
#16
Quote by deadsmileyface



You are Donald MacKinnon!

....

Scrolled down and first thought this was a reaction-pic to the quiz. I know that was pretty much my expression.
Tell me who's that writin'...