#1
Hey

I have two chords which i put together which i quite like but i am a bit lost how i work out the second chord.

The first chord is like this:

---1-----
---3-----
---2-----
---0-----
----------
----------

Which i have noted down as D minor.

Next chord is this:

---0-----
---1-----
---0-----
---0-----
---------
---------


So the intervals for the second chord i think is this:

1-4-6-2

So theres no 3rd or 5th. I've no idea what name it is... I'm assuming i've changed key at this point and am no longer in D minor, or maybe i am.. i'm so confused =/
Last edited by thefollower at Mar 14, 2014,
#2
Could be an Em7#5. i think. Based on you intervals, it´s not though
Last edited by jazzlp at Mar 14, 2014,
#3
Cadd9/D?

D minor and C major variant... could be in keys of D minor, C, A minor, or F major at this point, (or others, if you get complicated), depending what follows. Because those are the four keys that have both of those chords within them. The melody you put over the chords also could determine / affect what key it is in.

Ken
Bernie Sanders for President!
#5
C/D

It's a C major chord with a D in bass.

Not every chord is a triad. Cadd9 means it is a basic C major chord with an added note, in this case an added 9th. And the 9th in this case is D (a ninth from C is D).

Add9 chord formula is 1 3 5 9. The notes can be in whatever order. You could call your chord a Cadd9 too. The lowest note is not always your root note. In this case the lowest note is the 9th. So your chord is 9 5 1 3, not 1 4 6 2. And it wouldn't even be 1 4 6 2. It would be 1 4 b7 9 which would make it a D9sus4 chord (considering that the lowest note was your root note). But I would say it's just a C/D chord (C major chord with a D in bass).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Mar 14, 2014,
#6
Add 9 means you add the 2 interval, which is the same note as the 9, without adding the 7th interval. A C add 9 interval is 1-3-5-9, while a C9 is 1-3-5-7-9

As krm27 said, this chord can be called different names, depending on which key it is in. It contains the same notes as a E minor 7 #5. 1=E, minor 3=G, #5=C (#B) and minor 7= D
#7
Quote by thefollower
Hey

I have two chords which i put together which i quite like but i am a bit lost how i work out the second chord.

The first chord is like this:

---1-----
---3-----
---2-----
---0-----
----------
----------

Which i have noted down as D minor.

Next chord is this:

---0-----
---1-----
---0-----
---0-----
---------
---------


So the intervals for the second chord i think is this:

1-4-6-2

So theres no 3rd or 5th. I've no idea what name it is... I'm assuming i've changed key at this point and am no longer in D minor, or maybe i am.. i'm so confused =/


I'd call it C/D You have the C major triad, with D as a Bass note for "color".

Because the Bass was D in both chords, I don't see that you changed tonal centers at all. In fact if you play this back and forth, I would suggest that the progression feels settled on the D note, and not the C note.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 15, 2014,
#8
Well, you can see it as a C/D or a Cadd9 third inversion (would that be the correct inversion, guys?).

Basically, an add9 chord is major chord with an added 9th (octave of the 2nd interval). So, in your case, it's a C major chord (C E G) with a D on top of it.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#9
Quote by aerosmithfan95
Well, you can see it as a C/D or a Cadd9 third inversion (would that be the correct inversion, guys?).

Basically, an add9 chord is major chord with an added 9th (octave of the 2nd interval). So, in your case, it's a C major chord (C E G) with a D on top of it.



Understand, that while on paper you could see it that way, the better route is to look at it from the function its playing in context. The ordering of chords from the bass note, can change the name of a chord, but is the function of that chord really what that chord is?


Is it G/B?

or is it Bm b6 (no 5th) ?

See my point? Theory by number is fine, but I think it helps to look at what it's doing, to determine: inversion, or slash chord. In this instance, C/D it's a slash chord, not an inversion.

Best,

Sean
#10
Quote by Sean0913
Understand, that while on paper you could see it that way, the better route is to look at it from the function its playing in context. The ordering of chords from the bass note, can change the name of a chord, but is the function of that chord really what that chord is?


Is it G/B?

or is it Bm b6 (no 5th) ?

See my point? Theory by number is fine, but I think it helps to look at what it's doing, to determine: inversion, or slash chord. In this instance, C/D it's a slash chord, not an inversion.

Best,

Sean


Yep, I see where you're coming from. It does make more sense that way.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#11
Quote by Sean0913
Understand, that while on paper you could see it that way, the better route is to look at it from the function its playing in context. The ordering of chords from the bass note, can change the name of a chord, but is the function of that chord really what that chord is?


Is it G/B?

or is it Bm b6 (no 5th) ?

See my point? Theory by number is fine, but I think it helps to look at what it's doing, to determine: inversion, or slash chord. In this instance, C/D it's a slash chord, not an inversion.

Best,

Sean


So what does slash chord mean? And how come some people are saying its a major chord, when there is no 3rd interval to determine if its minor or major?
#12
If you view it as a C chord, then there IS a third -- the E is the third of C-- which reflects a C major chord, with an added D as the bass note. Since the D is not in the second octave, perhaps Cadd2/D would be more precise? I'm not best person to ask.

And I'd agree since both chords have D as bass note, the key seems rooted in D (D minor) if you only play these chords. But I'm not 100% sure that you could not pay a melody over this that establishes a different key, like a melody that is almost all F's like F-F-F-C-F-F-F-C...could it start to sound like an F major tune? I don't know enough to say, but I cannot rule it out based on what I presently know.

The suggestion not to call it an inversion confuses me since it is an inverted C major with added D in bass position, unless you only use "inverted" label when the 3rd or 5th is in bass position and when you have a slash-bass note, then you no longer care musically what order the rest of notes are, so issue of "inversion" sort of evaporates?


Ken
Bernie Sanders for President!
#13
If the bass is staying on a D, the 2nd chord could be called a D9sus--the C and E notes could imply the D9, and the G makes it "sus". But the name of the chord is less important than the fact that it sounds good.
#14
Quote by krm27
If you view it as a C chord, then there IS a third -- the E is the third of C-- which reflects a C major chord, with an added D as the bass note. Since the D is not in the second octave, perhaps Cadd2/D would be more precise? I'm not best person to ask.

Ken


Nope. It has nothing to do with the octave of the note. add2 doesn't really mean anything. A 2nd is kind of like an "avoid" note that adds tension to a chord. It usually replaces the 3rd. A 9th is an extension and it does not replace the 3rd.

A C/D chord is a C major chord with D in the bass.
"I agree with Matthew about everything" - Everyone
#15
Quote by thefollower
So what does slash chord mean? And how come some people are saying its a major chord, when there is no 3rd interval to determine if its minor or major?

A "slash chord" is like C/D ("C slash D" - that's where the name "slash chord" comes from, it has nothing to do with Slash from Guns N' Roses ). C/D means C major chord with D in bass. Dm/F would mean D minor chord with F in bass and G7/C would mean G dominant 7th chord with C in bass. You get the idea.

And it is a major chord. It is a C major chord with D in bass. The notes in your chord are D, G, C and E. C, E and G form a C major chord, D is the bass note.

Lowest note is not always the root note. For example if we play A major chord like this

0 0 2 2 2 0

the lowest note is E. But the root note is still A. You can have the chord tones in whatever order and it's still the same chord.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#16
Quote by thefollower
So what does slash chord mean? And how come some people are saying its a major chord, when there is no 3rd interval to determine if its minor or major?

Slash chord means play this chord over this bass note.

C/D = C Major triad over a D bass note.

The example in the opening post is

0 = E
1 = C
0 = G
0 = D

The notes C E G form a C major triad. When it comes to the chord name and the order of the notes the only thing that really matters is the bass note. It doesn't matter what note is on top or what order they appear in if the chord is made up of C E G in any order then it is most likely a C major chord. If the bass note is not the root of the chord (If you're playing a C major chord and the bass note is not C) then the chord name needs to tell you what bass note to play.

C/D means play the notes of a C major triad over a D bass note.

[EDIT]Too slow. MaggaMarine already answered. That'll teach me for starting to type a response then going to get my kid some breakfast and coming back to finish the post later!! haha.
Si
#18
Quote by jazzlp
Add 9 means you add the 2 interval, which is the same note as the 9, without adding the 7th interval. A C add 9 interval is 1-3-5-9, while a C9 is 1-3-5-7-9

As krm27 said, this chord can be called different names, depending on which key it is in. It contains the same notes as a E minor 7 #5. 1=E, minor 3=G, #5=C (#B) and minor 7= D


It's only "in the bass" if there's an actual bass part. Cadd9 is sufficient otherwise.
Last edited by cdgraves at Mar 19, 2014,
#19
Quote by cdgraves
It's only "in the bass" if there's an actual bass part. Cadd9 is sufficient otherwise.

This is true. The chord you are playing isn't all about what you play. It's also about what the other instruments play at the same time. But I'm pretty sure if your riff was Dm and this chord, the bass would play D all the time and it would be C/D.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#20
If a bass part were doing that, yes, it could be C/D. If not, maybe a D9sus4. With only two chords, it all depends what happens next.

For the original poster's enlightenment: when you have a harmony that isn't a straightforward triad, the name often depends on the chord's function, or the function of specific notes in the chord. If the lowest note of each chord is meant to spell out a "bass" melody, then you'd analyze the chords separately from the bass line.

The "bass" is also not just the lowest note in the guitar chord, it's the lowest distinct melodic part in the music. Most of the time, the guitar is not playing with to which "in the bass" would apply.

Slash chords are usually used to indicate two things:
1) A bass melody separate from the chords. Most harmonies are in root position, so you sometimes see things like C-G/B-Am to indicate that the bass is playing a specific melody, not just root notes. But do not use slash chords to show inversion of guitar chords alone.

2) Non-chord tones in the bass. If you have a chord with a goofy note underneath that isn't normally in the triad, like G/C.