#1
Is it true that Gibson have changed the quality of the woods they use since the early 2000's. I'll hopefully be investing in a Gibson Les Paul in the coming future and have done a bit of research on this. I've concluded that there's a generally consensus that they have changed the quality of the wood they use, and it has effected the quality and tone of their instruments. Is this true, or am I talking complete sh*t? Have any of you noticed a difference in their pre and post 2000 products? Cheers
#3
moving to Electric Guitar
edit:
Quote by Dimarzio45
Repost this in the"Guitar Gear" category.

I'd think GG&A is more for guitar related paraphernalia and not so much the instruments themselves, which is the domain of EG
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
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and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#4
Quote by ryan2t69
Is it true that Gibson have changed the quality of the woods they use since the early 2000's. I'll hopefully be investing in a Gibson Les Paul in the coming future and have done a bit of research on this. I've concluded that there's a generally consensus that they have changed the quality of the wood they use, and it has effected the quality and tone of their instruments. Is this true, or am I talking complete sh*t? Have any of you noticed a difference in their pre and post 2000 products? Cheers

No, I'd say they are still using good quality wood, especially in the higher end ones. You do see more of the studio series/ entry level Gibson's using multi piece bodies a little more, but the quality of the wood is still good IMO.
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#5
Quote by Hydra150
moving to Electric Guitar
edit:
I'd think GG&A is more for guitar related paraphernalia and not so much the instruments themselves, which is the domain of EG

Yeah, I really dropped the ball on that one. Can I ever be forgiven?
#6
Probably not.
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#8
I don't think the quality is any different.

What I do know is they are not drying the wood as long as they used to. It seems every year or two they cut the dry time by a few weeks... I believe that is going to bite them in the ass at some point.

Back in the 60s/70s/ Gibson purposefully dried their wood up to 4 years. They believed that it was an important step at the time.

Now I don't think it gets dried out longer than a year... just push em out the door I guess. I myself had an issue with a 2010 Gibson Traditional where the finish just flaked off after 2 months. Gibson admitted the finish was put on when the wood was "too wet"
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Last edited by cheesefries at Mar 15, 2014,
#9
By that logic, in about 17 years, they'd be down to cutting the wood and immediately turning it into a guitar. I don't buy it. The fact is, the wood has to be dried to reach equilibrium. Whether it's air-dried, or kiln-dried, really doesn't matter that much to me. Fact is, if you have large supplies of wood sitting around for 4 or 5 years air drying, how much money do you think that makes Gibson?
#10
actually they may have no choice but use somewhat lesser grade wood due to cost/availability. high quality wood has become scarcer and of course pricier. I'd be willing to bet that on the lower end guitars that the wood quality may be somewhat lesser than it was 14 years ago. if the quality remains high then expect price increases (which we've been seeing).
#11
Quote by KG6_Steven
By that logic, in about 17 years, they'd be down to cutting the wood and immediately turning it into a guitar. I don't buy it. The fact is, the wood has to be dried to reach equilibrium. Whether it's air-dried, or kiln-dried, really doesn't matter that much to me. Fact is, if you have large supplies of wood sitting around for 4 or 5 years air drying, how much money do you think that makes Gibson?


I frankly dont care if you "buy it'

This was MY 2010 BRAND NEW Traditional Plus 2 months old at the time. The headstock finish peeled and fell off. This happened to a couple hundred others I've been told during the same year. They admitted to it not being properly dried.

They are NOT drying them like they used to. During the 60s/70s they openly boasted about their "proper dry time" that took 4+ years. Because of demand they can't do that anymore.

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Last edited by cheesefries at Mar 15, 2014,
#12
Quote by monwobobbo
actually they may have no choice but use somewhat lesser grade wood due to cost/availability. high quality wood has become scarcer and of course pricier. I'd be willing to bet that on the lower end guitars that the wood quality may be somewhat lesser than it was 14 years ago. if the quality remains high then expect price increases (which we've been seeing).

This is exactly what I've heard too. Other industries have been struggling as well.
#13
Quote by cheesefries
I frankly dont care if you "buy it'

This was MY 2010 BRAND NEW Traditional Plus 2 months old at the time. The headstock finish peeled and fell off. This happened to a couple hundred others I've been told during the same year. They admitted to it not being properly dried.

They are NOT drying them like they used to. During the 60s/70s they openly boasted about their "proper dry time" that took 4+ years. Because of demand they can't do that anymore.


That's the nitro not being finished, not the wood.
And your anecdote about "hundreds" is just that.
#14
Quote by cheesefries
I frankly dont care if you "buy it'

This was MY 2010 BRAND NEW Traditional Plus 2 months old at the time. The headstock finish peeled and fell off. This happened to a couple hundred others I've been told during the same year. They admitted to it not being properly dried.

They are NOT drying them like they used to. During the 60s/70s they openly boasted about their "proper dry time" that took 4+ years. Because of demand they can't do that anymore.




The wood is kiln dried to 9-10%.
To air dry wood would take a heck of a lot longer than 4 years.
Your bubbles under the tuners isn't because the wood wasn't dried, it's simply lifted off the fibre headstock cover (which isn't even wood by the way). On the RIs it's holly but on the USA models it's synthetic.

To the OP's original question the lower end models get multipiece bodies, the higher end ones get the large single piece bodies but it's farmed mahogany wood either way. Gibson has introduced alternate woods for the fingerboards on some models (baked maple, Richlite etc)
Moving on.....
#15
Quote by cheesefries
I frankly dont care if you "buy it'


It's just simple logic. If they keep cutting the dry time then eventually they would be doing just as suggested, which is nonsense.

Besides, you got a source for that? How do know what the dry time is and how do you know they're cutting it down every year? I hear a lot of these supposed practices yet somehow can never find any of it outside posts like yours.
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Last edited by Mephaphil at Mar 15, 2014,
#16
I have a vague memory of reading something a year of two ago that they're having to use wood from younger trees as the tree farms obviously can't just magic up trees of a certain age.

Only a vague memory though, so take it for what it's worth.

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#18
Gibson has been using the same suppliers for their woods for the last 17 years, so no. It's unlikely that much has changed.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Mar 15, 2014,
#19
Quote by dspellman
All but one of my Gibsons were built prior to 1980.

Don't worry, we all start with used kit. Maybe one day you'll be able to afford something new


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Barber Tone Press > EHX Worm > TC Polytune > MXR Custom Badass 78 > EXH Glove > EHX East River Drive > Zoom G3 > TC Spark Mini Booster
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#20
Quote by ryan2t69
Have any of you noticed a difference in their pre and post 2000 products? Cheers

i have. somewhere around the mid 2000s things changed.

if i were to buy a gibson, it would be a 2003 or earlier.
#21
Quote by GaryBillington
Don't worry, we all start with used kit. Maybe one day you'll be able to afford something new


Exactly. Helluva thing.
#22
Quote by gregs1020
i have. somewhere around the mid 2000s things changed.

if i were to buy a gibson, it would be a 2003 or earlier.

Seconding this.
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