#1
If I want to get a volume pedal, how much should I be spending? Surely there can't be that much difference between brands if all they do is make you louder.

I play in a band with 2 guitarists and I play lead. I want to be louder than the rhythm player while doing solos, but don't want to drown him out during verse and chorus sections. Is a volume pedal the answer to my woes?
#2
Quote by Himynameisben95
Is a volume pedal the answer to my woes?


Well, it can be... It can also be your worst enemy ya stand there with one foot on the pedal and one on the floor all night..

I've used one for, well.... a whole lotta years... I like the Morley pedals myself... I would have a hard time playing without one. It adds dynamics to my solo's and allows me to turn it down a notch while playing rhythm. Myself, I have a hard time using the volume knobs on my guitar, so a volume pedal works for me...

Clear as mud?
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Some don't
I don't care
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OLD GUYS RULE!!!!
#3
For the sake of simplicity, since what you wanna do is simple, I'd put a boost or an overdrive in the fx loop and activate it when the solo comes.
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#4
You get what you pay for. Buy a decent pedal. I'd recommend the Boss FV-500H. That's what I have. It's built like a tank.
#5
Quote by Himynameisben95
If I want to get a volume pedal, how much should I be spending? Surely there can't be that much difference between brands if all they do is make you louder.

I play in a band with 2 guitarists and I play lead. I want to be louder than the rhythm player while doing solos, but don't want to drown him out during verse and chorus sections. Is a volume pedal the answer to my woes?


First item of business -- if your amp doesn't have the power to cut through on leads now, a volume pedal won't help. If you can't do what you want with the volume knob on your guitar, owning a volume pedal is pointless. If your rhythm player (and the rest of the band, especially the drummer) doesn't get that he needs to cut volume during solos, a volume pedal won't help.

Often, it's not extra volume that you need as much as it is extra volume at certain frequencies to cut through the mix. I have guitars with active (battery powered) treble boosts (up to 27 dB) and sweepable mid boosts (around 16 dB) installed on push-pulls. Look at the Chandler Tone-X for the latter, and/or consider using a parked wah pedal. These use the power available in your amp more efficiently than simply boosting volume overall. Remember that in order to double the overall volume, you need to bump the amp power by 6-10X -- so if you're using most of a 30W amp now, you're looking at 200-300W simply to double the volume.

Volume pedals are really better used as an expression pedal than a loudness boost.
#6
Hey Ben! The simplest thing that a lot of bands do without spending any $$$

1. You set your amp and guitar up for lead to cut through then roll your volume back a bit to something like 8. When you solo put it on 10. Back to 8 for Rhythm.

Or

2. You stay at your normal volume. When you solo the other guitarist rolls back his volume a bit to give you more "room" At the end of your solo you are both back to 10. When the other guitarist solos you roll your volume back to 8 to give him "room"

If you want to spend money on a pedal you could get a boost/overdrive pedal, eq (boost mids), or a volume pedal (you would use it just like #1)
Last edited by cheesefries at Mar 15, 2014,