#1
So I'm not exactly sure how this works. I have a very general question and I'm going to do my best to provide the information you need to get the answer I'm after. Brace yourself, this might be a long one. I really do appreciate any input though.

I won't bore you with too much background. To make a long story short I played the saxophone for many years. Switched to guitar. Have been here for a few years now. I really enjoy it but I feel like for the last year or so I haven't made any progress. My teacher taught me the minor Pentatonic. I learned the Major on my own. Learned countless chords and I'm pretty decent with them. Same with the scales. I've played them so many times they're burned into my memory and muscles and I just rattle them off. I can read tabs and sheet no problem. When it comes to playing along to a backing track. Nothing. When I'm in a room with guys jamming. Nothing. These are things I'd like to work on. I feel like anyone could eventually learn to read tab or sheet and replicate something someones already done. But what about what I want to do?

I like everything from Blues to Metal. Don't really dig too much country but the songs that I do like, I really like. Some of my favorites musicians are random. Hendrix, Frusciante (before he left the Peppers, kind of out there now), Zakk Wylde (older stuff, Book of Shadows), Gary Clark Jr., and the list goes on. So I guess I'm more centered on Blues/Rock.

Where do I go from here to reach my goals? I'd eventually like to be able to put together some songs of my own in those styles. I have plenty of time and am more than willing to put the work in. Just don't know where my work should be focused. Unfortunately getting another teacher really isn't an option and my original teacher and me have a serious schedule conflict at the moment.
#2
What do you mean "nothing"? You plug in to improvise and are struck with paralysis? The sound and power goes dead? You lose hearing and the world sinks into a void?


Try expanding upon your definition of "nothing" because that tells Me "nothing". You go into a lot of detail, and at the part where you get to the heart of the matter you just drop off "nothing".

Best,

Sean
#3
Patience. This takes time. It won't happen overnight, but if you keep at it, it will come. Remember how long it took to learn the sax - guitar will also take some time. I'm trying to learn piano and constantly have to remind myself that I didn't learn guitar overnight. Hang in there.
#4
I mean exactly nothing. I stand there like a deer in the headlights. But if it's something I know I don't even hesitate.

As far as it coming with time.. Surely there's a way to speed it up. I just sit there working through scales most of the time. Sure they are still getting better. I'm also adding in more exercises but what else should I focus on? I learn in a very technical way. Say you hear a backing track. What is the first step you go through mentally? Figure out the key? Then what?

I'm just trying to take steps past this hurdle. All input is appreciated.
#5
Quote by Sean0913
What do you mean "nothing"? You plug in to improvise and are struck with paralysis? The sound and power goes dead? You lose hearing and the world sinks into a void?

Try expanding upon your definition of "nothing" because that tells Me "nothing". You go into a lot of detail, and at the part where you get to the heart of the matter you just drop off "nothing".

Best,

Sean


how anyone even attends your so called free music lessons is simply beyond me?
you constantly come across as bombastic throughout these forums and in serious need of things being spelt out to you so you are able to finally understand...

Simply reading between the lines will tell you that lilwill000 refers to 'nothing' as can't seem to come up with many musical ideas (riffs/licks) on the spot, has a kind of musical mind blank.

Talk about a needing to be spoon fed robot. seriously... are you even all there mate?
Last edited by tonibet72 at Mar 17, 2014,
#6
Quote by tonibet72
how anyone even attends your so called free music lessons is simply beyond me?
you constantly come across as bombastic throughout these forums and in serious need of things being spelt out to you so you are able to finally understand...

Simply reading between the lines will tell you that lilwill000 refers to 'nothing' as can't seem to come up with many musical ideas (riffs/licks) on the spot, has a kind of musical mind blank.

Talk about a needing to be spoon fed robot. seriously... are you even all there mate?



Thanks for the personal attack. One thing I can tell you, is that it shall remain "beyond you". You are on the outside, and so a lot about Me will be that mystery. You're nothing new here. You don't get what I'm doing or agree with what I'm saying. I get it. Let's just agree to that. I'm good there. Just because you don't like my style doesn't mean that I don't know what I'm doing. It's really easy to judge me from a distance, but I don't find you of any concern.

The saying, wolves do not concern themselves in the trifilings of sheep, comes to mind. If you want to get to know me, then do so. Otherwise, a lot of what I do will continue to be a mystery to you, but that's your choice.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 17, 2014,
#7
To learn to improvise you need to improvise. Don't expect your first own solos to sound good. Remember that music isn't just scales. It's about melody. Use scales as a way of finding the notes you are looking for. If you know the scales well, you'll find any note you want. But you need to decide which notes you want to find - and that's all about sound. Know the sound, not just fingerings. At least have an idea of how what you play will sound like. You may hit notes that you didn't want to hit but they just give you new ideas.

I started improvising on trumpet a bit over a week ago (I play in a military band and we had a jazz/background music gig so I had to learn to improvise a bit). My improvisation isn't great but I have seen a lot of improvement. Maybe not that much in my ear (which is pretty decent but not perfect) but more in my confindence. And I would say good solos are about confidence. If you show that you are not sure of what you are doing, it will be heard. But if you just play and don't really care if you hit wrong notes and if you believe in your melody, it will sound a lot better - of course not mind blowing but I would say that's the first step in improvising. You just need to play something.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Don't want to get involved in that so I just explained a little further. I guess I just need to step outside of my comfort zone and have at it. I'll get it sorted out.
#9
Quote by lilwill000
I mean exactly nothing. I stand there like a deer in the headlights. But if it's something I know I don't even hesitate.

As far as it coming with time.. Surely there's a way to speed it up. I just sit there working through scales most of the time. Sure they are still getting better. I'm also adding in more exercises but what else should I focus on? I learn in a very technical way. Say you hear a backing track. What is the first step you go through mentally? Figure out the key? Then what?

I'm just trying to take steps past this hurdle. All input is appreciated.



Thank you for your clarification. I once played with an amazing piano player, and they could play the most amazing pieces, but one day I said "Improvise in A" and he looked at me blankly. He was conditioned to playing *things* that were in front of him, but never learned how to just create.

I read a quote tonight that resonated with me, "I get paid to play music, not to play scales".

Instead of practicing scales to be the music, use the scales to create the music. You learn in a technical way, but improvisation is a non technical subjective thing. It's not x's and o's. It's paint and you are the brush.

I can answer your question well. Many of the homework assignments and playing assignments of my students involve backing tracks.

So the process is:

1. Listen to the music...first decide if I like what Im hearing. If I don't why am I playing with it? I need to feel a connect to it starting out.

2. Determine the key, and is it major or minor?

3. Determine my starting point. I can go to any point in any scale, because I know the notes of my scales, and I know the notes on the neck so if it's in Eb say, I can start on the 3rd string 8th fret and depending upon if its a Major key or Minor key, I play that note.

4. From there I might do a slide, or a sustained note, to the next note in the scale. I evaluate where that "seems" to want to go from there? Do I want to go higher or lower? What do I feel?

5. I listen to what I've done. Is it moving me? Maybe it's not. So I look at the scale superimposed, and maybe try something else, maybe I want to use wider intervals. Maybe I want to play and find a theme and then expand upon it.

6. At eash step I mentally evaluate as I listen and then I decide what I want to do next.

You have to start somewhere. You may think it should be faster, but maybe the fact is, it's going to take a long time for you. I'm not popular nor known for telling people what they might want to hear, but I'm coming from a real place here.

Things take some work. You could easily be overtraining scales, and then expecting application to be automatically there, and that's not how it works. My student's lead improv from Lecture 5 of Lead Guitar 1 sounds way differently than the one he submits at Lecture 16 on Lead Guitar 1, but in that time, he's submitted homework after homework, he's played, and received direct feedback/critique/suggestions and by the time he's at 16, he's learned a lot more how to lock in to his improvisation.

But between 5 and 16 there was 6 and 7 and 8 and 9....you see where I'm going? You start somewhere and you keep playing. You take an idea and twist it and TRY it. Jam Tracks are a great Laboratory to say, "Hmmm wonder if this would sound good?" and try it, knowing you're not going to die if it doesn't work, but you sure will learn a new thing or other.

An example is arpeggios. Say you know your minor 7 arps. What about Minor 7ths that start on the 3rd instead of the Root? What about a Minor 7th that starts on the b3rd and works up a 5th from there and then back?

Sometimes playing scales sounds like running up and down stairs. Scales are a tool, they are not music.

I hope this helps you find your own place, and musical voice as you move forward.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 17, 2014,
#10
Quote by lilwill000
So I'm not exactly sure how this works. I have a very general question and I'm going to do my best to provide the information you need to get the answer I'm after. Brace yourself, this might be a long one. I really do appreciate any input though.

I won't bore you with too much background. To make a long story short I played the saxophone for many years. Switched to guitar. Have been here for a few years now. I really enjoy it but I feel like for the last year or so I haven't made any progress. My teacher taught me the minor Pentatonic. I learned the Major on my own. Learned countless chords and I'm pretty decent with them. Same with the scales. I've played them so many times they're burned into my memory and muscles and I just rattle them off. I can read tabs and sheet no problem. When it comes to playing along to a backing track. Nothing. When I'm in a room with guys jamming. Nothing. These are things I'd like to work on. I feel like anyone could eventually learn to read tab or sheet and replicate something someones already done. But what about what I want to do?

I like everything from Blues to Metal. Don't really dig too much country but the songs that I do like, I really like. Some of my favorites musicians are random. Hendrix, Frusciante (before he left the Peppers, kind of out there now), Zakk Wylde (older stuff, Book of Shadows), Gary Clark Jr., and the list goes on. So I guess I'm more centered on Blues/Rock.

Where do I go from here to reach my goals? I'd eventually like to be able to put together some songs of my own in those styles. I have plenty of time and am more than willing to put the work in. Just don't know where my work should be focused. Unfortunately getting another teacher really isn't an option and my original teacher and me have a serious schedule conflict at the moment.



If you're looking to compose music just take licks or chords from other songs you like pretty much just experiment it;s the only way! I am so serious about this it's a trial, and error processes, and the same thing applies to improvising as well.


About the backing track thing if you're looking to improvise what I suggest you should do is just to get one lick, and try to play it many different ways over the backing track make sure you record yourself while doing this... There's really no point in learning 100's of licks if you don't know how to use them properly just remember it's quality over quantity.

BB king is a good example of this in most songs he'll play a few licks I've transcribed many of his songs.. He plays one lick 100's of different ways it's awesome because he gets so much different sounds from it just imagine if you knew 100's of licks, but you knew how to play each lick 100 different ways? You'd be an improvising machine my friend.


There's some musicians out there that only know how to play a handful of chord, but boy do they make them sound great! All I can really say is experiment that's how I learned to improvise by slowing down records and transcribing licks or chords I thought sounded good then I would mess around with them doing this will help you develop your own style.. If anything don't think about what the other artist would do with said lick or chord think about what you would do!


It's not bad to imitate if you're trying to learn someones music, but when it comes down to composing your own music do you really want to be just another clone? There's plenty of people out there that sound like Stevie Ray Vaughan come on now why would I want to listen to the cheap knock off when I could just listen to the original..


Alright screw it I made this post too long lets bring it to a conclusion just experiment it takes years to develop your own style all it really comes down to is experimenting with different sounds Mate!
Last edited by Black_devils at Mar 17, 2014,
#11
Quote by Sean0913
Thanks for the personal attack. One thing I can tell you, is that it shall remain "beyond you". You are on the outside, and so a lot about Me will be that mystery. You're nothing new here. You don't get what I'm doing or agree with what I'm saying. saying, let's just agree to that. I'm good there.

Best,

Sean


Correction and Reminder: it was you_ who didn't get what was being said...
and as for personal attack I wasn't the one who ignorantly ripped into my "Tab is cheating" thread labelling it the stupidest thing you've read in UG the last 4-5 years... It was in support of Tab/sheet music etc...

Again: YOU didn't get it... oh wait... looks like there's a theme building here with you...

You're getting old here.
Last edited by tonibet72 at Mar 17, 2014,
#12
Quote by tonibet72
and as for personal attack I wasn't the one who ignorantly ripped into my "Tab is cheating" thread labelling it the stupidest thing you've read in UG the last 4-5 years... It was in support of Tab/sheet music etc...

?

you do realize his post in that thread was agreeing with your entire point, correct
#13
Quote by :-D
?

you do realize his post in that thread was agreeing with your entire point, correct

yeeeeah??? ....naaaaah??? ...

quote"Stupidest thing I've ever read in the 4-5 years I've been here. "unquote

... yeah, without that last line, perhaps, that'd be a different story!
after re-reading the entire reply, i'm still not so sure about that, it can still very much be read as if he believed I was saying Tab was cheating, and that he vehemently disagreed with that notion... call what you will, it can be percieved either way.


at least one thing we both do agree on is TAB RULES!!!!
#14
This thread is not for bringing up grudges from other threads or flaming other users.

Respect the thread starter and keep it on topic.
Si
#15
Thanks for the help guys. Aside from scales what else would you day are important elements to soloing?
#16
Quote by lilwill000
Thanks for the help guys. Aside from scales what else would you day are important elements to soloing?



Figuring out solos by ear pretty much..
#17
Quote by 20Tigers
This thread is not for bringing up grudges from other threads or flaming other users.

Respect the thread starter and keep it on topic.

....given any distant hope that things just may have improved and blossomed into a full bearded affair of the hairiest of the hairiest of facial haired kind (little extra foodie bits included)... at this stage, I think in my heart of hearts, I just need to start seeing other people again... so I have to regretfully agree... that perhaps right now, a parting of the ways just might be for the best...

ah that's better, feels like huge weight's been lifted, wise council twenty!

movin on...
#18
Quote by lilwill000
Thanks for the help guys. Aside from scales what else would you day are important elements to soloing?


T.S: Yeah some of my influences can be totally random too...
I dunno... Cannibal Corpse to Bob marley (yeah right like that really covers it??)
hopefully you get my meaning

As far as I have been able to ascertain over the years, musicians are either really technical ie: concentrate on what they do and do it well (Black Devils description of BB King's 100x100), or they listen to an insane variety of stuff ranging from roots to contemporary to avant garde innovation (Bowie) which gives them a super rich scope covering all the changes, styles and nuances to the likes of the technician... or both (Hendrix had he not died?)... Nile Rogers... to many to mention (including all previously mentioned of course).

Point being: the world is forever turning and with that, a new day constantly greets us, and these people are constantly inspired by music and life on a daily basis, is it really any wonder that they continue to inspire the rest of us!

maybe you're just in a patch of writers block at the moment... just keep going, something will eventually come from it, don't be discouraged...
1% perspiration... 99% inspiration.
#19
Quote by lilwill000
Thanks for the help guys. Aside from scales what else would you say are important elements to soloing?


Have you heard of call and response? Some people call it "question and answer". Here's a basic exercise.

Start a jam track, determine the key/scale you want to use. Since you are starting out, use something simple, like a minor pentatonic off the key off the jam track (make sure that one is in minor as well).

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I am sure that others might be following this as well, so here's a thought, if you want to try something differently:

FOR ADVANCED/EXPERIMENTAL PLAYERS.

It doesn't have to be a root scale. For example in a minor "funk style" key, say it was a groove in Am, I might want to play off of B:

B D E F# A

This adds a couple of cool notes that are not regularly in our palette: B and F#

Over an Am, these would function as a 9th and a natural 6. The natural 6, is commonly associated with that "Dorian" feel. The 9th, just sounds hip and jazzy. Both of these would not be ideal "landing notes, but to use them as passing color notes sounds pretty cool. The rest of the notes in this scale, are fine with the Am Pent.

You have A E and D - all of these are already in the A Pent minor scale.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Now, back to the call and response idea.

First of all when you define your scale, next you want to LIMIT yourself to three notes. As the track plays, sight those three notes and play no more than 3 notes and listen and sustain. This is the "question" asked.

Next phrase, play another 3 notes, and let them sustain. This is the "answer" that you play to that question.

Now, when starting out, do not expect the clouds to open, and the suns rays to come pouring through transporting you to a state of nirvana like enlightenment . You will most likely be like a toddler attempting their first steps. That's okay. Stay at it. Using less notes, forces you to listen to those notes, and create a sense of value of those notes. It also forces you NOT to over play. It's very experimental and rudimentary, but it teaches you a lot. Spend 5 minutes, or one pass of the track and then do it again, and this time play 4 notes, per question and answer.

Then do it again, play 3 notes for the question, and 4 notes for the answer. No bends, and NO licks. Stay away from what you "know". You're getting the idea. Learn to listen and interact, and familiarize yourself with "pitch collections" and let your ear guide you.

Over time, you'll begin to see how useful this approach can be, when improvising. I'm sure you've heard someone say "he really makes that guitar talk".

Good luck to you, and I hope this helps.

Best,

Sean
Last edited by Sean0913 at Mar 17, 2014,
#20
Quote by :-D
?

you do realize his post in that thread was agreeing with your entire point, correct


I don't think he does. But, that's okay.

My vitriol is against anyone that presumes to tell someone ELSE, that because THEY play tab, that they are "cheating". I'm not in defense of TABS or not, but I am in defense of ignorant statements like "cheating" as if we all are in some competition, race, or there are some perceived rules which govern the one TWUE way that someone can learn, play or enjoy their music.

And, I stand on that point. People need to mind their own business, and if tabs don't work for you, fine, but don't shame or lambaste someone that uses them, and tell them they are cheating. There are no trophies, son. Grow up. Leave the playground games on the playground.

And that was my point. I'm sure you saw it. But obviously he didn't.

Best,

Sean
#21
What you're going through is normal. I took private lessons for a number of years. My instructor started teaching scales after just a few lessons. I wanted to be a rhythm guitarist and didn't see much value in learning how to play lead/solo.

I can still remember him playing a chord progression and me just sitting there - having no idea what to play. I'd start to play something and just stop - I'd tell him I had no idea what I was doing. As time went on, I slowly got better. The strange thing was, that I could hear a song being played on the radio and, in my head, hear where the solo should go - but I couldn't do it with a guitar in my hands. The problem was, I hadn't developed my mind to the point where I could hear his playing, hear the lead part in my head and transfer that to my fingers on the guitar. And that's exactly what you need to be able to do.

Try listening to a practice track - don't even pick up your guitar. Try humming the lead part in your mind, or even out loud. Are you able to do at least that much? I'm willing to bet that you are able to do it. And you're probably able to come up with some parts in your head that sound pretty good. Now that you know you have the ability to improvise a lead part in your head, let's try the same exercise again. Again, no guitar for this exercise. This time, I want you to stop as soon as you've created a part that you think sounds good. Pick up your guitar and play that same part you just heard in your head. It doesn't matter if you can't do it right away. I just want you to work on transferring what you heard in your head to the fretboard. This is going to do a couple of things - it's going to help you tie what's in your head to the guitar and it's also going to teach you interval relationships - that last one is crucial. Since you know your scales, just make sure you're not playing everything on the same string - keep your efficiency high by playing in the same area, if possible. It will take some time, but eventually, you will be able to listen to what's being played and you'll hear the lead line in your head and automatically transfer it to your fingers.

When you play along with a song or a jam track, you should be able to lock in and play decent lead within hitting two or three notes. I have a song playing in the background right now. Without knowing the key, I found a note that fit within three notes and started playing lead along with it. The song, incidentally, was in the key of B. I don't have perfect pitch, so I have to work to find the key.

By the way, my plans to be a rhythm guitarist never happened. Sure, I play rhythm at home and I really enjoy playing it, but the group I play with needed a lead player. That's my role and I really enjoy it. Keep at it. Don't get discouraged. There is no fast method of learning lead other than practicing it every day - it really does take time to learn. You will get it.
#22
Quote by KG6_Steven
What you're going through is normal. I took private lessons for a number of years. My instructor started teaching scales after just a few lessons. I wanted to be a rhythm guitarist and didn't see much value in learning how to play lead/solo.

I can still remember him playing a chord progression and me just sitting there - having no idea what to play. I'd start to play something and just stop - I'd tell him I had no idea what I was doing. As time went on, I slowly got better. The strange thing was, that I could hear a song being played on the radio and, in my head, hear where the solo should go - but I couldn't do it with a guitar in my hands. The problem was, I hadn't developed my mind to the point where I could hear his playing, hear the lead part in my head and transfer that to my fingers on the guitar. And that's exactly what you need to be able to do.

Try listening to a practice track - don't even pick up your guitar. Try humming the lead part in your mind, or even out loud. Are you able to do at least that much? I'm willing to bet that you are able to do it. And you're probably able to come up with some parts in your head that sound pretty good. Now that you know you have the ability to improvise a lead part in your head, let's try the same exercise again. Again, no guitar for this exercise. This time, I want you to stop as soon as you've created a part that you think sounds good. Pick up your guitar and play that same part you just heard in your head. It doesn't matter if you can't do it right away. I just want you to work on transferring what you heard in your head to the fretboard. This is going to do a couple of things - it's going to help you tie what's in your head to the guitar and it's also going to teach you interval relationships - that last one is crucial. Since you know your scales, just make sure you're not playing everything on the same string - keep your efficiency high by playing in the same area, if possible. It will take some time, but eventually, you will be able to listen to what's being played and you'll hear the lead line in your head and automatically transfer it to your fingers.

When you play along with a song or a jam track, you should be able to lock in and play decent lead within hitting two or three notes. I have a song playing in the background right now. Without knowing the key, I found a note that fit within three notes and started playing lead along with it. The song, incidentally, was in the key of B. I don't have perfect pitch, so I have to work to find the key.

By the way, my plans to be a rhythm guitarist never happened. Sure, I play rhythm at home and I really enjoy playing it, but the group I play with needed a lead player. That's my role and I really enjoy it. Keep at it. Don't get discouraged. There is no fast method of learning lead other than practicing it every day - it really does take time to learn. You will get it.



IMO I think playing rhythm is harder than playing lead alone.. If anything playing chords is an essential thing with the guitar there's just so much to be done with different chord voicing's and what not. If someone learns to play rhythm guitar before lead guitar it makes transitioning to lead guitar so much easier it doesn't go the other way around. I find it funny how there's so much lead guitarist out there that can't even subdivide beats that's why it's important to learn rhythm first lead guitar will always be there it's not that hard.


Think about it how can you accompany a singer with just playing licks? People don't move to lead guitar they move to the strumming of the chords licks don't have that full sound, but chords do! I've met many guitar players that are pretty good at lead but tell them to strum a chord and they'll look at you with a clueless face. Not to mention, but playing lead doesn't get you the gigs. but playing rhythm does a great rhythm guitarist is priceless most guitarist in general have pretty shitty timing anyways..


If anything to the OP if you're just starting out I'd suggest you leave lead alone and focus on your rhythm guitar chops you'll be thanking me in the long run.
Last edited by Black_devils at Mar 17, 2014,
#23
I suspect this is one of those things where YMMV. I found that playing rhythm was easier than playing lead, which is why I wanted to be a rhythm guitarist. I also took jazz lessons for longer than I care to talk about here and am currently taking piano lessons. I firmly believe that the one will help with the other - that is, learning piano will pay benefits to the guitar playing and vice versa. I know what you're saying about voicings.

I also think it's important to learn rhythm and lead from the beginning. Years ago, my daughter was taking ice skating lessons and I was surprised to see them making her learn how to skate backwards, when she couldn't even skate forwards. Then, it dawned on me that it was critical for her to learn both at the same time, so that each came natural later. My guitar instructor employed the same technique - the lightbulb lit. When I started teaching guitar students, I used the same technique.

My guitar instructor also told me something that I'll never forget. You stated that playing lead doesn't get you gigs, but rhythm does. When he told me we were going to start working on learning lead guitar, I had already made my mind up that I was only interested in playing rhythm - I stated that earlier. He said, "What if you want to join a band and they need a lead guitarist?" I sat there for a moment and realized that I had no response. He was right. While being able to play good rhythm is important, if I didn't know how to play lead, I wouldn't be with the group I'm in right now. I will always be a strong advocate of knowing both and I think it's important to learn them together - from the start.

Everybody just starting out has bad timing - I know I did. I can still remember how bad my timing was playing rhythm. However, it got better, as did my lead playing.

So, the rhythm player is just that... he provides some rhythm to the song. However, the lead player provides some interest by supplying riffs and fills. It's like the difference between a hamburger patty, or putting that patty on a bun and adding pickles, cheese, lettuce, tomato, ketchup and mustard. Of course, we all know the bass player is totally useless. Ok. Just kidding. He provides a nice foundation for the song, laying down a beat pattern.

So, who gets all the glory in a band? The rhythm player or the lead player?
#24
How many times does a guitarist only play lead guitar in a band (if we are not talking about all the basic bedroom guitar heroes)? Most of the time you play both lead and rhythm. I don't actually know any lead guitarists that don't also play rhythm guitar in their songs.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115