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#1
Hello.

Im just curious about how important guitar practice is to guitar ability.

If someone has been playing for two or three years but only practices when he likes, say once or twice a week, while another guitarist who might have been playing guitar for a short amount of time, maybe less than a year, but he practices every single day.

Based on your experience and knowledge, who do you think would be better?
#2
Generally whoever practices more is better, but it depends how you practice. Please don't be one of those guys though that views guitar a competition though, because your only competition should be yourself.
I don't really want to answer your question, but I'm still going to answer it and probably say the guy who's been playing a year.
There's so much more I could elaborate on this, but I'm sure others will do it for me.

EDIT: Your last thread you made is essentially asking the same thing.

Stop being one of those guys who compares himself to others. No-one cares except yourself and other naive, juvenile guitarists.
Last edited by vayne92 at Mar 16, 2014,
#3
Quote by vayne92
Generally whoever practices more is better, but it depends how you practice. Please don't be one of those guys though that views guitar a competition though, because your only competition should be yourself.
I don't really want to answer your question, but I'm still going to answer it and probably say the guy who's been playing a year.
There's so much more I could elaborate on this, but I'm sure others will do it for me.

EDIT: Your last thread you made is essentially asking the same thing.

Stop being one of those guys who compares himself to others. No-one cares except yourself and other naive, juvenile guitarists.

Couldn't agree more. When you drop the competitive attitude and focus on your own desires and expectations, you unleash a greater potential within your playing.

Edit- Not to say, TS, that you're being THAT guy, necessarily. However, it's golden advise that every guitarist should receive sooner rather than later.
Last edited by Dimarzio45 at Mar 16, 2014,
#4
It's more about time and effort put into it, years played mean next to nothing because it doesn't say anything about how much they've actually played.

You have your casual guitarist A playing songs and noodling 3 hours a week and you have your dedicated aspiring prodigy B who practices technique 8 hours a day.

B has played for nearly 3000 hours in a year
A has played less than 500 hours in 3 years, and the practice being random and far less efficient

This is why you see these guitar phenoms who play like a god and you think they're lying when they say they only played for a couple of years.
#5
Quote by chickenpiepwns
Hello.

Im just curious about how important guitar practice is to guitar ability.

If someone has been playing for two or three years but only practices when he likes, say once or twice a week, while another guitarist who might have been playing guitar for a short amount of time, maybe less than a year, but he practices every single day.

Based on your experience and knowledge, who do you think would be better?


Quality of practice is just as important. You can grind away with the metronome all you like but if you're doing it with huge tense motions and you never try anything new then you'll never improve either.
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#7
The player who plays everyday will be better - much better. This observation is based on personal experience. I started playing at 14 and surpassed my friends, some of which had been playing since they were 6 years old, in two years. The only thing that really distinguished all of us was that I was playing 2 -3 hours per day, sometimes more, whereas they were scattered in their playing time and approach.

If you want to be good at guitar, you need to put in the time. It's really that simple.
#8
It's not about quantity when it comes to practicing on the guitar it's about the quality you put into your hours of practicing it doesn't matter if you practice 8 hours a days if it's sloppy, and not focused then you won't really see any progress. If you practice 2 hours a day, but it's extremely focused you have everything you're practicing lined up in a structured way then yes you will see a lot of progress in your playing. When it comes to practicing you should always be working on things that you struggle with or trying to push your self to the next level if that song you've been working on is easily played now move onto a new challenging song.


There's a clear difference between practice, and playing some people play for hours but can't really manage to practice for 30 minutes learn to separate the two! Also to the OP I would take everyone who's posted on this threads advice very seriously there is no competition in music at the end of the day it's completely subjective some people think that the best guitarist are the most non technical while other think that the shredders are the best there's even some people out there that are in favor of the musician who only knows a handful of chords AC DC is a good example of this.


Don't compare yourself to others if anything use it as encouragement and motivation for you to get better!
#9
Lots of practice combined with critical - but positive - attitude will yield the best results. And regularity is more important than duration. ie, one hour every day is far more beneficial than 7 hours every Saturday.

As has been said, you have to watch out for your blind spots. There's pretty much always something you can improve about your playing, so you should put effort into seeking those things.

Anymore and I actually love it when I notice I'm doing something wrong. It's an opportunity for improvement all around, and it keeps my practice routine from getting stagnant.

To get the most from your time, it's generally suggested to have some sort of routine. You get to a certain level and you actually need to practice a few hours a day to maintain your skill, and it can be pretty hard to find 3 hours of music just to jam on every single day.

Divide your time into:
-basic workouts (warm ups, scales, short exercises)
-skill building (technical challenges, ear training)
-music (new stuff, music you know, music for studying concepts, writing, improvisation, etc)

Having the discipline to sit down and do music, combined with practiced skill, will really help you get the most from your creativity.
#10
Quote by cdgraves
Lots of practice combined with critical - but positive - attitude will yield the best results. And regularity is more important than duration. ie, one hour every day is far more beneficial than 7 hours every Saturday.


+1 (and also quality of practice, as has been mentioned already)

There's also a school of thought which says that you should actually not put too much effort into the things you're not so good at but concentrate on getting really, really good at the things you're already pretty good at. I'm not sure where I fall on that... I suspect a happy medium between not ignoring the stuff you're really poor at, but at the same time not being a mediocre jack-of-all-trades at everything.

It also depends on what you're not so good at, if it's "guitar" then you need to get better . Plus it depends on what your goal is, if you want to play in a cover band or something like that, being a jack of all trades might be more useful than being a badass at one particular style.

I'd also say to keep it fun... playing (rather than practising) gets a bad rap but I think it's useful, too. It's a more "real world" scenario than practising drills etc., and it also lets you focus on the music and being musical rather than the technique.

Admittedly I'm biased because I play far, far more than I practise.
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Last edited by Dave_Mc at Mar 17, 2014,
#11
I think good practice is important. In the last few months or so I've only been practising every other day for an hour or so and I've been playing or jamming in the days between, but I've improved at a faster rate compared to my first couple of years of learning where I would spend almost 3 hours a day 'practising'.

This gives me some time to reflect, absorb and see where I need to improve. It's easy to fall into the trap of practising for long hours every day and only spending 30 mins on those days actually playing music.
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#12
It depends on a number of factors (learning speed, dedication, and time spent practicing) that make you a better guitar player. You could practice for 5 hours a day and still sound worse than the guy who practices 5 hours a week, but both of those guys are going to sound better than the guy who doesn't practice. Don't treat guitar like a competition. Practice to impress yourself.
#13
It's somewhat complicated, but the most amazing guitarists rarely put the guitar down. Jimi often slept with his.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

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#14
Quote by Cajundaddy
It's somewhat complicated, but the most amazing guitarists rarely put the guitar down. Jimi often slept with his.



Jimi Hendrix was good at what he did because he was always playing with others..


Honestly that's the best way to get good at playing an instrument constantly playing with other musicians that are way better than you it's weird because just doing this some how makes you better it's like their skills, and style just rubs off on you.
#15
Jimi was good as his note choice was very unique not the amount of hours he jammed but that did ad to it owerall. Take the Isle of wight 1970 gig. Jimi had not played for about a month prior to that and had not slept for a few days before when he landed in UK. He went in cold and it showed. Still Jimi on an of night is still cool to some extent.

Practise is important but it should be productive and feelings of progress.
#17
yes. its all about purposeful, careful, dedicated practice.
i started playing guitar the summer before my senior year of high school. one year later i was going to berklee with an audition based scholarship.

you get what you put in.
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#18
As a 35+ year weightlifter i compare Guitar playing to weight lifting. progress is so slow you dont even notice then next thing you know your stealin the show..Practice !!!
#19
Practice is very important. If you don't practice, you will not improve. However, I have known people who have practiced more than others, but never improved. Maybe guitar just wasn't for them.
#20
I know of a guy that started out on day one not knowing his head from his ass about playing a guitar, exactly one year later he was playing every song from Children of Bodem like it was nothing. I use him as my "local" inspiration today. He practiced every day for at least two hours.
#21
Quote by mxr81999
I know of a guy that started out on day one not knowing his head from his ass about playing a guitar, exactly one year later he was playing every song from Children of Bodem like it was nothing. I use him as my "local" inspiration today. He practiced every day for at least two hours.


... That's not enough time and he's probably actually terrible.
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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#22
Different strokes for different folks.

Once I learned how to play guitar to my satisfaction I began to build my muscle strength.

So for me, I would say it depends on where you are and what is applicable.
#23
I can't stress enough how important it is to now your fingerboard. Every guitarist learning to solo must learn the Minor Pentatonic scale, it doesn't get any simpler than that. once you've mastered that, extend to playing the pentatonic scale in all five positions (watch this video http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=juOiwLamdFA) it doesn't matter what genre you play metal/blues it all starts at the pentatonic. know that it takes months if not years to really understand a concept properly. Practice makes perfect. other things you should be looking at are Major Modes. theres a ton of information on the internet.
#24
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
... That's not enough time and he's probably actually terrible.


^^^^^^^^^
#25
The one who practices more will be better, the amount of time you've been playing doesn't count for a whole lot, i've been playing for a year and half and i've seen people who've been playing for 10 years that i'm better than but also i've seen people playing for 6 months who are better than me but don't make the mistake of thinking guitar is a competition, it isn't, it's about enjoying it no matter how good you are
"Music Without Emotion Is Like Food Without Flavour"
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#26
The more time for practice, the more room for improvement.

No one becomes a great guitarist overnight but if you practice, you are getting better than what you are yesterday.
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#27
the oft used phrase..you play what you practice..so yes its important to me..now i am applying symmetric harmony and intervallic patterns in my daily studies...and sure enough..that outside sound i hear in my head is now in my fingers..

its what do you want to play...how bad do you want to play it...what are you willing to do to achive that goal

check out a player named Muris Varajic..ask yourself ... does he practice

wolf
#29
Quote by Zaphod_Beeblebr
Quality of practice is just as important. You can grind away with the metronome all you like but if you're doing it with huge tense motions and you never try anything new then you'll never improve either.


This is very true
#30
I read somewhere that 20 minutes a night is better than 2 hours on a weekend.Obviously you'd practice longer than that but i think frequent practice is better than just picking your guitar up when you can be bothered.
#31
Quote by EyeballPaul
I read somewhere that 20 minutes a night is better than 2 hours on a weekend.


Indeed. You'd get more from practicing an hour each day than lets say practicing 4-5hours a couple times a week
#32
Quote by CJGunner7
The one who practices more will be better, the amount of time you've been playing doesn't count for a whole lot, i've been playing for a year and half and i've seen people who've been playing for 10 years that i'm better than but also i've seen people playing for 6 months who are better than me but don't make the mistake of thinking guitar is a competition, it isn't, it's about enjoying it no matter how good you are



Perfect example of how years of playing doesn't matter it's all about the quality hours you put in.
#33
It's all about the hours put in, stick time, string time, call it what you want. It's NOT about how many "years" you have been playing.
#34
what kind of question is this? practice is very important in becoming a good guitar player.
Last edited by ryanpeppers at Apr 6, 2014,
#35
Practice is overrated. As long as you buy a guitar that's made in America, a tube amp, and the most expensive boutique pedals you can find, you will sound great.
#36
Practice is the most important thing towards getting better; but more is not always better. The key to practicing is to practice effectively--which is best accomplished by focusing on things other then the amount of time you are practicing. Generally, the easiest way to try to practice effectively is to take lots of breaks (don't practice for over an hour straight without doing so, and definitely don't practice the same thing for an hour straight), avoid going on auto-pilot (basically you should be constantly engaging your analytical and musical mind--if your practicing something like scales for example you can be focusing on the sound/quality of the scale, the level of relaxation in your right and left hand, your posture, trying to hear in your head the next pitch before you play it), avoid practicing mistakes (if you make a mistake CORRECT IT before moving on--because each time you make it again you are ingraining the habit) practice severely under performance tempo, practice the smallest cogent chunks of a piece possible, avoid practicing mindless repetitions and focus on combing disparate strands of musical and technical information (for example, instead of running a piece straight down separate it into different parts and apply different articulations and dynamics, try to play one bar then hear the next in your head, try to play it backwards, try transposing it to a new key or putting it in an odd meter etc.), because you learn more form combining and creating ideas then you will from memorizing. It's also a good idea to make sure to warm up and cool down each practice session, and to try to do something creative every time you sit down to play.
all the best.
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#37
Quote by 757ian123
Practice is overrated. As long as you buy a guitar that's made in America, a tube amp, and the most expensive boutique pedals you can find, you will sound great.

I see sarcasm, everywhere.
#38
Quote by AngryHatter
I see sarcasm, everywhere.


What? Isn't that why everyone buys that stuff, so they don't have to practice?
#40
It all depends on how the person practices. If the person picks up a guitar and strums chords for an hour, it wouldn't be the same as another player who tries to push himself for a half-hour. If you're not putting in the effort to do correct practice (as opposed to noodling), you won't improve. Guitar, after all, isn't a contest. Even if you get to a level that you're comfortable with, you have to practice enough to maintain that level.

Quote by 757ian123
Practice is overrated. As long as you buy a guitar that's made in America, a tube amp, and the most expensive boutique pedals you can find, you will sound great.


Yeah, but does it have mojo?
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Last edited by aerosmithfan95 at Apr 8, 2014,
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