#1
Ok so i've been looking into purchasing a 12 string to add to my collection for a while now and jumped at this Cort someone was selling online for $80. I'm just looking to get an insight into what i've bought, whats it worth and how i would go about replacing the nut and saddle and pretty much anything else i can do to make it sound as good as it can get.







Serial and model no.

http://www.imgnip.com/viewer.php?file=40431613025673795003.jpg


Thanks in advance
Last edited by zach.paynter.9 at Mar 17, 2014,
#2
12 Strings take a lot of abuse, simply due the the high string tension they endure. (about 250 LBs at full pitch).

You have to be very careful and very objective, as to whether or not you will be able to set the action low enough for comfortable playing.

If you don't think you can get ahe action to 3/32" at the 12th fret, while still having a decent amount of the white saddle sticking over the bridge, you have to let the instrument go.

What goes wrong is this. The high string tension causes the soundboard in front of the bridge to cave in a bit, and at the same time, the neck raises in relation to the soundboard. This creates some weird ass, strings to top, to saddle geometry, that trust me, you don't want to deal with.

12 strings sound good with phosphor bronze strings. 80/20 "brass" alloys are way too bright. I leave strings on my 12's, until the fret wears through the tiny wound G-3.

12's are so resonant, that, "new string sound", is way more of a curse than a blessing.

Is this 12 you're looking at a "plug me in"? 'Cause 12's are really bright, and they always respond favorably to a fair amount of treble roll off , and a healthy shot of bass boost.

Tune your 12 down to D-D standard, then capo up 2 frets when you play. That saves the guitar, lessens the string tension overall, and takes the height of the top nut out of the equation. You'll find it much easier to play in that configuration.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Mar 17, 2014,
#3
When i picked up the guitar it looked like it had 0.11s on it and was set up in E standard, thatnks for the tip about tuning it to D standard as well, i was planning on tuning to D anyway but i never thought to use a capo. The neck doesnt seem to have been under that much stress though, considering, it was fairly straight when i picked it up.

What i am asking though is just some info on the guitar and how i would replace the saddle and nut, because they were causing the strings to rattle pretty badly before i took the strings off.
#4
the saddle is easy to replace, just lift it out once the strings are loose enough. you'll have to carefully sand it down to get the desired action... the operative word being "carefully" you sand off too much at once and all of a sudden your ordering another one. replacing the nut i strongly recommend you leave to a professional. replacing it is easy... setting the string height is a mother. it also requires a specialized set of nut files. it's cheaper to have someone do it than the file set will set you back.
are you sure the tuners aren't loose causing the rattle???
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#5
Thanks, and yeah its definitely the nut causing the strings to rattle. It looks pretty torn up nad there are grooves that i am pretty sure shouldnt be there.